You Don’t Miss Your Water – The Byrds (1968)

You Don’t Miss Your Water – The Byrds (1968) FLAC Remaster Audio 1080p Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“You Don’t Miss Your Water” was released on The Byrds’ sixth studio album, Sweetheart of the Rodeo , in August 1968. The Byrds also recorded a version with Gram on lead, but I think Roger McGuinn really soared on this tune!

This album is not only my favorite by The Byrds, it’s one of my Top 25 All-Time. I’ve already done a full video for “Hickory Wind” and updated it twice! 😉 but I wanted to do equalizer vids for a couple more of the tunes I like the most. Actually, it’s very hard to choose favorites, but I really love this tune. I think this FLAC version taken from the Deluxe Edition (also used for the last “Hickory Wind” video) has the greatest sound.

Recorded with the addition of country rock pioneer Gram Parsons, it was influential as the first major country rock album by an established act and represented a stylistic move away from the psychedelic rock of the band’s previous LP, The Notorious Byrd Brothers. The Byrds had occasionally experimented with country music on their four previous albums, but Sweetheart of the Rodeo represented their fullest immersion into the genre thus far. The album was also responsible for bringing Gram Parsons, who had joined the Byrds prior to the recording of the album, to the attention of a mainstream rock audience for the first time. Thus, the album can be seen as an important chapter in Parsons’ personal and musical crusade to make country music fashionable for a young audience.

The album was initially conceived as a musical history of 20th century American popular music, encompassing examples of country music, jazz and rhythm and blues, among other genres. However, steered by the passion of the little-known Parsons, who had only joined the Byrds in February 1968, this proposed concept was abandoned early on and the album instead became purely a country record. The recording of the album was divided between sessions in Nashville and Los Angeles, with contributions from several notable session musicians, including Lloyd Green, John Hartford, JayDee Maness and Clarence White. Tension developed between Parsons and the rest of the band, guitarist Roger McGuinn especially, with some of Parsons’ vocals being re-recorded, partly due to legal complications, and by the time the album was released in August, Parsons had left the band. The Byrds’ move away from rock and pop towards country music elicited a great deal of resistance and hostility from the ultra-conservative Nashville country music establishment who viewed the Byrds as a group of long-haired hippies attempting to subvert country music.

Upon its release, the album reached #77 on the Billboard Top LPs chart, but failed to reach the charts in the United Kingdom. Two attendant singles were released during 1968, “You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere”, which achieved modest success, and “I Am a Pilgrim”, which failed to chart. The album received mostly positive reviews in the music press, but the band’s shift away from psychedelic music alienated much of its pop audience. Despite being the most commercially unsuccessful Byrds’ album to date upon its initial release, Sweetheart of the Rodeo is today considered to be a seminal and highly influential country rock album.

[Lyrics]
In the beginning
You really loved me, oh
I was too blind
I could not see, now

But now that you left me
Ooh, how I cried out, I keep crying
You don’t miss your water
‘Till your well runs dry

I kept you crying
Sad and blue, oh my, oh
I was a playboy
I just wouldn’t be true

But now that you left me
Good lord, how I cried, I keep crying, I keep crying
Ooh, I didn’t miss my water
No I never missed my water
‘Till my well were run dry

I sit here and wonder
How in the world this could be, my, oh my
I never thought, oh, I never thought
You’d ever leave me

But now that you left me
Good lord, good lord, how I cried
You don’t miss your water, you don’t miss your water
‘Till your well runs dry

Ooh, you don’t miss your water, oh, you don’t miss your water
‘Till your well runs dry
I miss my water
I keep missing my water
I keep missing my water
And I want my water
I need my water
I love my water
And I want my water
And I’m little thirsty, now
And I’m little thirsty, now
I want my water
I keep wanting my water

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You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere – The Byrds (1968)

You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere – The Byrds (1968) FLAC Remaster Audio 1080p Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere” was released on The Byrds’ sixth studio album, Sweetheart of the Rodeo , in August 1968. This album is not only my favorite by The Byrds, it’s one of my Top 25 All-Time. I’ve already done a full video for “Hickory Wind” and updated it twice! 😉 https://youtu.be/XnYgUf2qqB8 but I wanted to do equalizer vids for a couple more of the tunes I like the most. Actually, it’s very hard to choose favorites, but the album opener “You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere” is a good choice for sure. I think this FLAC version taken from the Deluxe Edition (also used for the last “Hickory Wind” video) has the greatest sound…lots of detail for all the instruments and some decent bottom end (sometimes their music seemed mixed in a way that the bass was a bit buried…maybe that’s just me?).

Recorded with the addition of country rock pioneer Gram Parsons, it was influential as the first major country rock album by an established act and represented a stylistic move away from the psychedelic rock of the band’s previous LP, The Notorious Byrd Brothers. The Byrds had occasionally experimented with country music on their four previous albums, but Sweetheart of the Rodeo represented their fullest immersion into the genre thus far. The album was also responsible for bringing Gram Parsons, who had joined the Byrds prior to the recording of the album, to the attention of a mainstream rock audience for the first time. Thus, the album can be seen as an important chapter in Parsons’ personal and musical crusade to make country music fashionable for a young audience.

The album was initially conceived as a musical history of 20th century American popular music, encompassing examples of country music, jazz and rhythm and blues, among other genres. However, steered by the passion of the little-known Parsons, who had only joined the Byrds in February 1968, this proposed concept was abandoned early on and the album instead became purely a country record. The recording of the album was divided between sessions in Nashville and Los Angeles, with contributions from several notable session musicians, including Lloyd Green, John Hartford, JayDee Maness and Clarence White. Tension developed between Parsons and the rest of the band, guitarist Roger McGuinn especially, with some of Parsons’ vocals being re-recorded, partly due to legal complications, and by the time the album was released in August, Parsons had left the band. The Byrds’ move away from rock and pop towards country music elicited a great deal of resistance and hostility from the ultra-conservative Nashville country music establishment who viewed the Byrds as a group of long-haired hippies attempting to subvert country music.

Upon its release, the album reached #77 on the Billboard Top LPs chart, but failed to reach the charts in the United Kingdom. Two attendant singles were released during 1968, “You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere”, which achieved modest success, and “I Am a Pilgrim”, which failed to chart. The album received mostly positive reviews in the music press, but the band’s shift away from psychedelic music alienated much of its pop audience. Despite being the most commercially unsuccessful Byrds’ album to date upon its initial release, Sweetheart of the Rodeo is today considered to be a seminal and highly influential country rock album.

[Lyrics]
Clouds so swift
Rain won’t lift
Gate won’t close
Railings froze
Get your mind off wintertime
You ain’t goin’ nowhere
Whoo-ee, ride me high
Tomorrow’s the day
My bride’s gonna come
Oh, oh, are we gonna fly
Down in the easy chair
I don’t care how many letters they sent
Morning came and morning went
Pick up your money
And pack up your tent
You ain’t goin’ nowhere
Whoo-ee, ride me high
Tomorrow’s the day
My bride’s gonna come
Oh, oh, are we gonna fly
Down in the easy chair
Buy me a flute
And a gun that shoots
Tailgates and substitutes
Strap yourself to the tree with roots
You ain’t goin’ nowhere
Whoo-ee, ride me high
Tomorrow’s the day
My bride’s gonna come
Oh, oh, are we gonna fly
Down in the easy chair
Genghis Khan
He could not keep
All his kings
Supplied with sleep
We’ll climb that hill, no matter how steep
When we come up to it
Whoo-ee, ride me high
Tomorrow’s the day
My bride’s gonna come
Oh, oh, are we gonna fly
Down in the easy chair

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“I’m gettin’ the feel of hickory wind”…country rock, meet your maker.

Hickory Wind – The Byrds (1968) Legacy Edition FLAC HD 1080p Video

(This video contains a lossless audio track. Please remember to watch my videos in HD if you are listening to them on headphones, home theater or if you just want the best sounding audio possible…..it does make a difference!)

“Hickory Wind” was released in 1968 on The Byrd’s album, Sweetheart Of The Rodeo. It was written by Gram Parsons, to whom country rock and alt rock owe everything…he died tragically at 26 at Joshua Tree in California….wandering the desert under the influence of mushrooms, alcohol, and morphine. I’m still in awe of the songs he wrote before checking out that night in 1973.

This is actually the 2nd time I’ve updated the video for “Hickory Wind”….in addition to the new video edit, it includes a FLAC version of the track.

“Hickory Wind” was written by Parsons and former International Submarine Band member, Bob Buchanan, during an early 1968 train ride from Florida to Los Angeles.

Post-production work on the Sweetheart of the Rodeo album was disrupted when Parsons’ appearance on the album was contested by Lee Hazlewood, who contended that the singer was still under contract to his LHI record label. While the legal problems were being resolved, McGuinn replaced three of Parsons’ lead vocals with his own singing, a move that still infuriated Parsons as late as 1973, when he told Cameron Crowe in an interview that McGuinn “erased it and did the vocals himself and fucked it up.” However, Parsons was still featured singing lead vocals on the songs “Hickory Wind”, “You’re Still on My Mind”, and “Life in Prison”. There has been speculation that McGuinn’s decision to re-record Parsons’ lead vocals himself was not entirely motivated by the threat of legal action, but by a desire to decrease Parsons’ presence on the album. According to producer Gary Usher:
“McGuinn was a little bit edgy that Parsons was getting a little bit too much out of this whole thing…He didn’t want the album to turn into a Gram Parsons album. We wanted to keep Gram’s voice in there, but we also wanted the recognition to come from Hillman and McGuinn, obviously. You just don’t take a hit group and interject a new singer for no reason…There were legal problems but they were resolved and the album had just the exact amount of Gram Parsons that McGuinn, Hillman and I wanted.”

With its mix of country and soul music, “You Don’t Miss Your Water” provides an example of Gram Parsons’ concept of “Cosmic American Music”. The song is also one of three on the album to have had its original Parsons’ vocal replaced by Roger McGuinn prior to release.

The three songs that had their lead vocals replaced by McGuinn were “The Christian Life”, “You Don’t Miss Your Water”, and “One Hundred Years from Now”, with the last featuring McGuinn and Hillman sharing vocals on the final album version. However, Parsons’ lead vocals weren’t completely eradicated from these songs and can still be faintly heard, despite having either McGuinn or Hillman’s voice overdubbed on them. The master recordings of these three songs, with their original Parsons’ vocals restored to full prominence, were finally issued as part of The Byrds box set in 1990. These same master recordings, featuring Parsons’ lead vocals, were also included as bonus tracks on disc one of the 2003 Legacy Edition of Sweetheart of the Rodeo.

Sweetheart Of The Rodeo is my favorite album by The Byrds….it is simply their most perfect effort. This version is from the fine 2003 Legacy Deluxe 2CD Remaster….if you love The Byrds, buy this CD!

[Lyrics]
In South Carolina, there’re many tall pines
I remember the oak tree that we used to climb
But now when I’m lonesome I always pretend
That I’m gettin’ the feel of hickory wind

I started out younger, had most everything
All the riches and pleasures, what else can life bring?
But it makes me feel better each time it begins
Callin’ me home, hickory wind

It’s a hard way to find out that trouble is real
In a faraway city with a faraway feel
But it makes me feel better each time it begins
Callin’ me home, hickory wind
Keeps callin’ me home, hickory wind

Clarence White (June 7, 1944 – July 14, 1973)

Clarence White was a great guitar player with The Byrds.

He was born on June 7, 1944 in Lewiston, Maine and died on July 14, 1973 after being struck by a drunk driver.   The accident occurred shortly after 2 a.m., while he and his brother Roland were loading equipment into their car in Palmdale, California, following a spur-of-the-moment reunion gig of the Colonels. Especially shaken by his death was Gram Parsons, who would lead a singalong of “Farther Along” at the funeral service and conceive his final song before his own death, “In My Hour of Darkness”, as a partial tribute to White.

This is one of my old videos, and there are many things that annoy me about the video today, mainly there is some pops/glitches that were produced with the render…..but it’s STILL a great tune and some great guitar playing….AND this song has always been a source of comfort whenever I’ve lost a little buddy.

And a few screen captures for alternate thumbs:

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