Walk it down. Talk it down.

Walk It Down – Talking Heads (1985) 96kHz/24bit FLAC 1080p Video

“Walk It Down” was released in June 1985 on Talking Heads’ sixth studio album, Little Creatures. I love every track from this album (it’s tied with Fear Of Music as my favorite by the band)….and I’ve been wanting to make some vids using the 96/24 DVD-A source tracks. I’d found this video short awhile back and after working it up to look better full screen HD, I’d been experimenting with it for a few tunes…..I liked it best with this track. I hope you enjoy it. Thanks for watching!

I haven’t yet been able to source the clip I worked up as there was no title, and very little information in the short credits. After processing the whole video, I edited out a couple sections to use with this song and then edited a mix to fit this video. I’ll post title information on the video short film if I can find it. It was wonderful and I’d love to credit it to the original creator. If it’s familiar to anyone, please let me know! Thnx!

The album examines themes of Americana and incorporates elements of country music, with many of the songs featuring steel guitar. It was voted as the best album of the year in The Village Voice Pazz & Jop critics poll and is the band’s biggest-selling studio album, with over two million copies sold in the US.

The cover art was created by outsider artist Howard Finster, and was selected as album cover of the year by Rolling Stone magazine.

In 2005, it was remastered and re-released by Warner Music Group on their Warner Bros./Sire Records/Rhino Records labels in DualDisc format, with three bonus tracks on the CD side (early versions of “Road To Nowhere” and “And She Was” and an extended mix of “Television Man”). The DVD-Audio side includes both stereo and 5.1 surround high resolution (96 kHz/24bit) mixes, as well as a Dolby Digital version and the videos of “And She Was” and “Road to Nowhere.” In Europe, it was released as a CD+DVDA two disc set rather than a single DualDisc. The reissue was produced by Andy Zax with Talking Heads.

[Lyrics]
I…I am just a number
I…hang on to what I got
You…say what you want to
I…I…I…I just try to stay alive
I…put myself together
People say, get away, somebody will turn you in
Life, life without surrender
Togetherness…ecstasy is what I need
I can laugh, but I should cry
When love and understanding are the ultimate crimes
Walk it down. Talk it down.
(oh, oh, oh) Sympathy. Luxury.
Somebody will take you there.
Walk it down. Talk it down.
(oh, oh, oh) Sympathy. Luxury.
Somebody will take you there.
She…says she remembers.
Time…long time ago.
We…belong together.
I…I…I…I turn up the radio
Lies, lies and propaganda
I…gonna tell you what I need
Life, life, without surrender
Togetherness…ecstasy is what I need
I got yours and you got mine
And I can swim, but I should fly
Walk it down. Talk it down.
(oh, oh, oh) Sympathy. Luxury.
Somebody will take you there.
Walk it down. Talk it down.
(oh, oh, oh) Sympathy. Luxury.
Somebody will take you there.
Ain’t no crime to believe
I took my money, I bet my life
What you see is what you get
But it sure ain’t what we need.
Walk it down. Talk it down.
(oh, oh, oh) Sympathy. Luxury.
Somebody will take you there.
Walk it down. Talk it down.
(oh, oh, oh) Sympathy. Luxury.
Somebody will take you there. 1080p video flac

 

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Conquistador a vulture sits, upon your silver sheath

Conquistador – Procol Harum (1967) *Stereo Version FLAC Remaster HD Video

Conquistador” was released in September 1967 on Procol Harum’s self-titled debut studio album.

Though the album was recorded on multitrack, it was issued as mono-only in the UK, and in mono and rechannelled stereo in the US. Despite extensive searching, the original multitrack tapes have not been located and thus a stereo mix of the original ten tracks may never be possible. Several alternate takes, however, have been mixed into stereo and are available on CD.

This is the stereo version of the song from Cherry Red’s excellent (and not heavily compressed!) 2CD. I love how the organ sounds on the stereo mix version….much more aggressive. I had the original video looking pretty clean, but then lost it a bit when I added all the effects….have to lose a bit of definition for the effects, but I like experimenting and making the videos look different….still refining my technique. 😉

I have been listening to a lot of Procol Harum lately….nearly exclusively Procol Harum, up and down the catalog for maybe three weeks! This was always a band I loved, but I hadn’t really ever done such a comprehensive and focused listen to their entire catalog. I knew the individual periods, but never really put it all together. I was so surprised to find so many great things that I’d forgotten (or never really knew). After this long period of re-evaluation Procol Harum has definitely clicked up several notches on my list of favorite progressive bands….from maybe just out of the top ten into the Top Five! 🙂 🙂 If you like PH and enjoy my videos, stay tuned! If you’re not a huge PH fan already, then I suggest you give their catalog a fresh listen (or three…..so much of their stuff really benefits from repeated listening to really open it up)….they have released a dozen albums in the past 50 years, from their first astonishing album in 1967 through last year’s seriously excellent album, Novum. I’m happy I’m deep into this band now and regret that I didn’t undertake a reevaluation of their work earlier.

All songs were originally credited written to Gary Brooker (music) and Keith Reid (lyrics), except “Repent Walpurgis” written by Matthew Fisher, after works by French organist Charles-Marie Widor and German composer Johann Sebastian Bach.

Procol Harum’s lyricist Keith Reid stated “Conquistador” was written before the lyrics. He added that this was unusual as “99 out of 100” of the Procol Harum songs, back then, “were written the words first, and then were set to music.”

The original North American release included a poster of the album cover.

The album has been repackaged and reissued many times. Two of the significant reissues are Procol Harum…Plus!, a 1998 CD compilation on the Westside label including all the songs from both the Deram and Regal Zonophone release, plus “Homburg” (the group’s second single) and nine additional tracks from the period; and a monaural audiophile vinyl LP edition released in 2003 by Classic Records, with yet a different track order, including “Homburg” as the opening track and without “A Whiter Shade of Pale” or “Good Captain Clack”. The set includes bonus singles of the original monaural and alternate stereo versions of “A Whiter Shade of Pale”. A 2009 remaster by Salvo Records, using the original mono masters, was released, with bonus tracks including the singles “A Whiter Shade of Pale”, “Homburg”, B-sides and alternate stereo takes. However, many of the tracks are played at a higher speed. A 2015 remaster by Cherry Red Records expands the album into a 2-CD set.

A live version of the track “Conquistador”, from the album Procol Harum Live with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, was released as a single in 1972 and charted to #16 in the US on the Billboard Hot 100 after 10 weeks on the chart.

[Lyrics]
Conquistador your stallion stands in need of company
And like some angel’s haloed brow
You reek of purity
I see your armor plated breast
Has long since lost its sheen
And in your death masked face
There are no signs which can be seen
And though I hoped for something to find
I could see no maze to unwind
Conquistador a vulture sits, upon your silver sheath
And in your rusty scabbard now, the sand has taken seed
And though your jewel-encrusted blade
Has not been plundered still
The sea has washed across your face
And taken of its fill
And though I hoped for something to find
I could see no maze to unwind
And though I hoped for something to find
I could see no maze to unwind
Conquistador there is no time, I must pay my respect
And though I came to jeer at you
I leave now with regret
And as the gloom begins to fall
I see there is no, only all
And though you came with sword held high
You did not conquer, only die
And though I hoped for something to find
I could see no maze to unwind
And though I hoped for something to find
I could see no maze to unwind
And though I hoped for something to find
I could see no maze to unwind

In days gone by there was a queen

A Fool For Love – Bryan Ferry (2002) 96 KHz/24 bit FLAC 4K Video

“A Fool For Love” was released on Bryan Ferry’s eleventh studio album Frantic, on Virgin Records in April 2002. The majority of tracks were produced by the team of Rhett Davies, Colin Good, and Bryan Ferry; David A. Stewart and Robin Trower also co-produced several tracks.

This is an update for another of my really ancient original videos. The plan was for a quick n easy update for a video that wasn’t too awful (as the early ones go) to begin with, mainly as an excuse to use a really great 96 KHz/24 bit FLAC from a vinyl needle drop….the most gloriously sounding version of this glorious track that I could find (I also have the album on the hard to find DVD-Audio) but this one sourced from vinyl really does bring the warmth and depth of the vinyl recording.

As with my updates, the goal was to try and update the original image, video and audio elements with higher quality/higher resolution files….and as usual, I ended up going a bit overboard on the thing. Definitely this is an epic tune that deserves an epic video….maybe just not quite THIS epic? LOL! All I really need is a good editor to help me dial it down, because while my brain is telling me “less is more” my heart is saying “forget that,….MORE IS MORE!” 😉 😉 Whatevs…if you know the tune I hope you enjoy the presentation…..and if you don’t know the tune, I hope the presentation opens it up and helps it become one of your new favorites! Thanks to my old friends for sticking around with me….and thanks to any newbies that might find and watch the vid.

Reviewing for AllMusic critic, Tim DiGravina wrote of the album “Some listeners might suggest that an album this varied has an identity crisis, but with [these] standout tracks as glorious as the Dylan covers and the Eno closer, Frantic is a fascinating addition to Bryan Ferry’s accomplished discography.” And reviewing for PopMatters critic, David Medsker wrote of the album “Frantic may play like a greatest hits album, with bits here recalling Boys and Girls and songs there echoing late Roxy, and it may rank in the middle to upper of the pack of his overall body of work. But it’s the most cohesive album he’s done in ages. Given how down and out he appeared to be, the fact that Frantic is more than half good is cause for joy.”

Frantic manages to touch upon virtually every musical style of Bryan Ferry’s career. Ferry has proved to be as interested in covering other artists’ material as penning original songs, and he straddles a smart mix of originals and covers here. Two brilliant Bob Dylan songs appear among the opening tracks: “It’s All Over Now Baby Blue” sees a return to the eclectic, energetic experimentation of Ferry’s early albums with Roxy Music as a lush modern swirl of instruments mingles with the singer’s stylized vocals and throwback harmonica; “Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright” completes the Dylan pair, as Ferry intones with confidence and again takes up harmonica over Colin Good’s rolling piano. The reverent Leadbelly cover “Goodnight Irene” reimagines Ferry as a kind of blues troubadour. “One Way Love” sees the Drifters’ song reworked as a squall of distorted guitars and keyboards. Almost half of Frantic’s songs originated from late-’90s sessions with Eurythmics’ Dave Stewart, and Stewart is given a co-writer credit for these songs. Though the Stewart songs tend to favor edginess over songwriting, a few of them manage to break through the bombast. “Goddess of Love” is probably the best song about Marilyn Monroe since Kitchens of Distinction’s “When in Heaven,” and there’s a passing musical resemblance to that great song. “Hiroshima” works like an ominous take on Roxy Music’s synth-heavy Avalon period, with raging guitar dynamics contributed by Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood. Roxy Music fans will find more reasons to rejoice with the superb album closer, “I Thought,” which was co-written with Brian Eno, who sings backing vocals and plays keyboards. Some listeners might suggest that an album this varied has an identity crisis, but with standout tracks as glorious as the Dylan covers and the Eno closer, Frantic is a fascinating addition to Bryan Ferry’s accomplished discography.

[Lyrics]
In days gone by
There was a king
A fool for love
And all it brings

So high and wise
Could read your mind
A fool for love
And love is blind

A crowded street
An empty train
A fool for love
You cry in vain

A fool for love
A fool for love
A fool for love

In days gone by
There was a queen
A fool for love
And all it means

Red ruby lips
Don’t touch me eyes
A fool for love
And love is blind

A fool for love
A fool for love
A fool for love

Like flowers in the rain
I’m twisted up inside
I’ll never be the same

I hear the same old lines
You played me for a fool
You really hurt my pride

A fool for love
A fool for love
A fool for love

In days gone by
There was a king
A fool for love
And all it brings

So high and wise
Could read your mind
A fool for love
And love is blind

Dust In The Wind – Kansas (1977)

Dust In The Wind – Kansas (1977) FLAC Audio 1080p Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

With at least 200 billion galaxies out there (and possibly even more), we’re very likely talking about a Universe filled with around 10 to the 24th planets, or, for those of you who like it written out, around 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 planets in our observable Universe.
I want to send my regards to everyone sharing this amazing one with me. All we are is dust in the wind…..love and spirit are the only thing that cannot be blown away. Peace, love n happiness y’all!

“Dust in the Wind” was released on Kansas’ fifth studio album, Point of Know Return, in October 1977. The track was hugely popular from the moment it was released, and rightfully so I believe as it is an outstanding melody with simple yet profound lyrics. Was hoping to get something for the New Year, and this seemed a good choice…not the fireworks I was thinking about, but a more reflective piece for starting the new year. Wishing you all a great 2018 and beyond!

This vid features FLAC audio from the Austria/Holland original CD release (which is less compressed than other CD versions….only slightly less than the original vinyl!)….once again, I’ve only barely nudged the equalizer to get what sounds best (IMO). Thanks for listening/watching/commenting/up-voting/adding to playlists/sharing…appreciate the support.

Think about giving a listen to another great Kansas track that always seemed to me kinda a continuation of this one. Where “Dust in the Wind” was about the earthly experience; “Ghosts” continued with the move into the spiritual experience; “Ghosts” from Kansas’ In The Spirit of Things album from 1988: https://youtu.be/pcbqPUOrdPI

My first video from Point of Know Return was “Portrait (He Knew)”…another fav Kansas tune, thinking I might push out an update for it soon: https://youtu.be/KwQJaBGc9Dk

From Wiki:
Singer/songwriter Steve Walsh left the group briefly. He would admit that, at this point, he had been something of a prima donna in an interview with nationally syndicated radio host Redbeard on the weekly rockumentary series In the Studio with Redbeard.

The album is critically acclaimed for singles like “Point of Know Return”. “Point of Know Return” was a later addition to the album. “Portrait (He Knew)” was written about Albert Einstein. In 1988, Livgren released an updated version of “Portrait (He Knew)” titled “Portrait II” as part of the album Prime Mover credited to his band AD. He changed the subject of the song from Einstein to Jesus Christ. “Closet Chronicles” is a Howard Hughes allegory.

“Dust in the Wind” is known for its sparse acoustic nature. The guitar line for the song was written by Kerry Livgren as a finger exercise for learning fingerpicking. His wife, Vicci, heard what he was doing, remarked that the melody was nice, and encouraged him to write lyrics for it. Livgren was unsure whether his fellow band members would like it, since it was a departure from their signature style. However he did offer it to them, and the song was accepted and then recorded.

Rolling Stone gave the album a mixed review, saying that though the transition to shorter songs generally works, the lyrics are “a wan and ridiculous rehash of the bargain-basement exoticism employed by the British art-rock crowd.” They commented that though the band lacks a virtuoso soloist, the band’s ensemble playing is strong and purposeful.

Point of Know Return would be Kansas’ highest charting album in the US, peaking at #4 in January 1978, and would sell four million copies in the US and be certified Quadruple Platinum by the RIAA.

During a debate of greatest “Song 1 Side 1” in history among the lead characters in the movie High Fidelity, Jack Black’s character criticizes one of John Cusack’s character’s proposals as “too obvious, like ‘Point of Know Return'”. The album cover has become an iconic image from the album rock era, appearing on the background of the set of VH1 Classic, on tee shirts worn by characters in movies and on TV, and in other places.

[Lyrics]
[Verse 1]
I close my eyes, only for a moment
And the moment’s gone
All my dreams pass before my eyes, a curiosity
Dust in the wind
All they are is dust in the wind

[Verse 2]
Same old song, just a drop of water
In an endless sea
All we do crumbles to the ground
Though we refuse to see
Dust in the wind
All we are is dust in the wind

[Bridge]
Oh, ho, ho

[Instrumental Break]

[Verse 3]
Now, don’t hang on, nothing lasts forever but the earth and sky
It slips away, and all your money won’t another minute buy
Dust in the wind
All we are is dust in the wind

[Outro]
All we are is dust in the wind
Dust in the wind
Everything is dust in the wind
Everything is dust in the wind
The wind

“I only had to dream to create the scene”

Magic Is A Child – Nektar (1977) SHM-CD FLAC Audio 4k Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Magic Is A Child” was the title track from Nektar’s seventh album, which was released in September of 1977. I bought this album when it was released though I didn’t know anything about the band…it was another of those cases where the cover art was intriguing enough that you needed to hear what was inside! 😉 Happy to say, I wasn’t disappointed and although I went on to listen to other Nektar albums released both before and after, Magic Is A Child remained my favorite by the band. Wanted to do a second video for a song from this album before moving on. Had a whole thing with ink effects started, then decided that I could just reuse the effect template I had made for Yes’ “Wonderous Stories”….of is it looks a little familiar?! 😉 Thanks for watching!

From Allmusic.com:
Magic Is a Child was released in 1977, the debut for new Nektar guitarist Dave Nelson. Carrying on, though, from where their last set left off, Nektar’s fascination with shorter, punchier songs continued unabated, even while the keyboards continued to swell and the guitars shifted ever more toward the symphonic. Nektar’s brightening vistas were new, however, and a fatal flaw as far as their fans were concerned. They didn’t want breezy pop, and breezy pop fans didn’t want Nektar, while the band’s new label, Polydor, apparently didn’t care either way. The art department did spring for the 13-year-old Brooke Shields to appear on the front cover, but that was it in terms of promotion. Thematically, too, little about Magic Is a Child recalls Nektar’s days as prog darlings. The opening “Away from Asgard” is a fine slab of Norse storytelling, tied into the vast dark forests of northern Germany (where the band was still based), while “Midnight Light” also has a romantic Germanic tinge, as it eulogizes the village of Seeheimut. “Love to Share,” in contrast, is an unabashed Beatles tribute, riddled with affectionate borrowings and an oddly effective backward drum, while “On the Run (The Trucker)” still sounds like a slice of AOR radio filler.

[Lyrics]
At the time I was a little boy
All my senses were in bloom
The forests were adventure
There dwelt the legends of my mind

I was the keeper of the golden key
I made all the rules
I only had to dream
To create the scene

Magic is a child
Imagination is alive
Magic is imagination
A child is alive

How the trees were so high
The cheese in the sky
Were part of my imagination
I was goblins and elves
With small mushroom shelves
As brothers Grimm would tell their stories

Opening my eyes in the morning I would see
Patterns in the trees making shapes that were a face to me

In those tireless times
And those carefree lines
That we draw ourselves
But they’re never kept

 

You should be sleeping.

Wide Awake – Elliot Easton (1985) FLAC Audio HDR 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Wide Awake” was released on Elliot Easton’s first (and only) solo record, Change No Change in 1985 on Elektra Records. It was re-released in 1996 by Elektra Traditions/Rhino Records (with 5 bonus tracks), and again released by Wounded Bird in 2006 .

I picked up this record in 1985 and was immediately disappointed that it didn’t sound more Cars-like. I really wanted to hear more of those amazingly, off-kilter guitar solos that made Elliot one of my very favorite guitarists. The solo that I found that came closest to his Cars sound was on “Wide Awake” which absolutely helped make that track my favorite off the album. I was in good company too as it turns out: In the liner notes to the re-release, both Easton and Shear cite “Wide Awake” as their favorite track from the album, with Shear saying “It has a little fairy dust quality about it with all the singing.”

Through the years I’ve come to enjoy this record much more and appreciate the different things that Elliot trying. There are other great songs on the album (including some of the bonus tracks) and I may do a couple more equalizer quickies just to do my bit to get them some additional exposure and recognition.

The video was a really quick excuse for me to listen to this song 20 times in a row! 😉 and even though I opted for one of my equalizer style vids which don’t require as much thought or effort, I probably should have given it a full treatment using some of the effects I found…with more photos and consistency with the sleeping models. It’s the high quality FLAC audio that is what is important here and I hope you enjoy this great song.

The original album consists of ten songs written by Easton and Jules Shear, who also contributed background vocals. Easton plays all guitars, including 12-string guitar, sitar and bass. The album’s producers were Stephen Hague, who had played with Shear in Jules and the Polar Bears, and synth player Jon Mathias. Roy Thomas Baker, who had produced the first four Cars albums, is given thanks in the credits for his encouragement of Easton’s solo project, but did not act as a producer.

The 1996 and 2006 releases feature five tracks from the unreleased debut album by Band of Angels (not to be confused with the mid-60s pop group A Band of Angels), a project Easton formed with singer Danny Malone. Easton does not sing lead on these tracks. “Walk on Walden” is an instrumental on 12-string guitar in drop D tuning.

[Lyrics]
Anyone? 😉

 

“It’s been a lifetime…”

Before The Dawn – Judas Priest (1978) Audio Fidelity 24k FLAC 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Before The Dawn” was released on Judas Priest’s fifth studio album, Killing Machine, in November 1978. “Before The Dawn” has always been one of my absolute top favorite rock and roll ballads and this video is an update for one of the first videos I ever made: https://youtu.be/OVMiki-oApA

I attempted to follow my challenge for updates and always to try and keep some of the older elements in place while upgrading for higher resolution and better effect, so that at least some parts of the original remained intact…in this case not much came across but a couple of images and the old, simple cloud/fog effect that I tried to use back then (much more subdued here, but in higher resolution).

This version also sources a flac audio track from Audio Fidelity’s 24k release of the album which was remastered by Steve Hoffman….it’s a great sounding track, and I touched the volume level just enough to keep under any clipping.

Killing Machine was re-titled Hell Bent for Leather for US release, as the US branch of Columbia/CBS did not like the “murderous implications” of the album title. “The Green Manalishi (With the Two-Pronged Crown)” an early Fleetwood Mac cover, was added to the running order in the US. The album saw Judas Priest head towards a more commercial style; however it did still contain the dark lyrical themes as heard in their previous albums. At about the same time, the band members adopted their now-famous “leather-and-studs” image.

This is the first Judas Priest album where Glenn Tipton incorporated the guitar technique of tapping into his soloing style. This is also the final album for drummer Les Binks who had joined the band in late 1977 for the recording of Stained Class, he is credited with helping develop the traditional Priest percussive sound.

With Killing Machine, Judas Priest began moving to a more accessible, commercial format that abandoned the complex, fantasy-themed songs of their previous three albums. While this album still had dark undertones, it was more grounded in realism. This was reflected in their change of stage costumes from flowing Gothic robes to leather, but also may have been inspired by the rising punk and New Wave movements. Glenn Tipton said in a contemporary interview that “I believe we are part of the New Wave. After all, we’re fast, aggressive and exciting, which is what it’s all about.” Tracks such as “Burnin’ Up” and “Evil Fantasies” are replete with S&M themes while “Running Wild” is about late-night partying and “Before the Dawn” a depressing ballad. “Hell Bent for Leather” reflected their newly adopted leather costumes as well as Rob Halford’s soon-to-be-trademark entrances on stage in a Harley-Davidson motorcycle. The single “Take on the World” was an attempt at producing a stadium shoutalong tune in the mould of Queen’s “We Will Rock You”, and was also covered by New Wave band The Human League on their 1980 tour.

If the lyrics were simplified a bit from the band’s previous albums and adapted more into mainstream arena rock, the instruments retained their characteristic aggressiveness with heavier guitar riffing and elements of blues influence returned on some songs. The album is certified gold by the RIAA. Finally, the production of Killing Machine was markedly improved from Judas Priest’s earlier albums, which were criticized for having excessively flat sound, and would be further refined for their next and breakthrough album, British Steel.

The album was remastered in 2001, with two bonus tracks added (three in the UK). The bonus track “Fight for Your Life” was the “original” version of Judas Priest’s “Rock Hard Ride Free” from their Defenders of the Faith album. “The Green Manalishi (With the Two-Pronged Crown)” is considered a bonus track on the UK remaster, but a regular track on the US version.

In 2010, audiophile label Audio Fidelity released a limited-edition 24-karat gold CD of the album. Mastering was done by Steve Hoffman. This does not contain the bonus tracks from the 2001 edition.

[Lyrics]
Before the dawn, I hear you whisper
In your sleep “Don’t let the morning take him”
Outside the birds begin to call
As if to summon up my leaving

It’s been a lifetime since I found someone
Since I found someone who would stay
I’ve waited too long, and now you’re leaving
Oh please don’t take it all away

It’s been a lifetime since I found someone
Since I found someone who would stay
I’ve waited too long, and now you’re leaving
Oh please don’t take it all away

Before the dawn, I hear you whisper
In your sleep “Don’t let the morning take him”

“On the step outside you stand…With your flowers in your hand, my Apple Scruffs..”

Apple Scruffs – George Harrison (1970) 96KHz/24bit FLAC 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Apple Scruffs” was released in November 1970 on George Harrison’s massive musical monument, the 3-album All Things Must Pass album. Continuing with more videos from one of my favorite albums. My idea was to use clips from Beatlemania to represent the “Apple Scruffs” but I liked the groovy dancers better! 😉

From Wiki:

The name “Apple scruffs” was first coined by George Harrison during the late 1960s. Although well known for his aversion to fan worship, particularly to the Beatlemania phenomenon, Harrison had formed a bond with a number of the scruffs; he acknowledged in an April 1969 interview with Disc magazine: “their part in the play is equally as important as ours”. His song “Apple Scruffs” was written as a tribute to the fans who had kept vigil outside the various recording studios he had been working in since late May 1970, during the sessions for his All Things Must Pass triple album, as well as the Apple headquarters on Savile Row. Although Harrison makes no mention of the song in his 1980 autobiography, Derek Taylor, in his role as editor, describes the Apple scruffs as the “central core” of fans, long after Beatlemania had subsided, adding that “We were all very fond of them”.

Harrison invited the Apple scruffs into Abbey Road Studios to hear the results. A teenager at the time, Gill Pritchard later recalled that Harrison told them: “Well, you had your own magazine, your own office on the [studio] steps, so why not your own song?”

The recording has been noted for its Bob Dylan influence, featuring Harrison on acoustic guitar and harmonica, and is recognized as a departure from the big sound synonymous with All Things Must Pass. “Apple Scruffs” was also released as the B-side to “What Is Life”, gaining further popularity through airplay on US radio, and became the preferred side of the single in some countries.

Harrison recorded “Apple Scruffs” late in the proceedings, during the overdubbing and mixing phase of All Things Must Pass. Uniquely among the tracks on All Things Must Pass, “Apple Scruffs” was performed solo by Harrison – except for a percussive, tapping sound provided by Beatles assistant Mal Evans. Harrison recorded the song live on acoustic guitar and harmonica, in the style of his friend Bob Dylan. Due to his heavy beard and mustache, Harrison struggled while attempting to play the harmonica; sessions tapes also reveal he needed to coach himself on the sucking and blowing technique required for the part.

Rolling Stone’s Ben Gerson considered “Apple Scruffs” to be “One of the most wonderful cuts on the album” and added: “it sounds as if it was recorded while co-producer Phil Spector was out for coffee.”

More recently, Beatles author Bruce Spizer has written of the song: “Sandwiched in the middle of an album full of elaborate wall-of-sound productions, Apple Scruffs breaks through like a breath of fresh air.” Simon Leng praises the track’s bottleneck parts, and particularly the backing vocals, which he describes as “the best on the album”. The same passage, towards the end of the song, has been referred to by Tom Moon in his book 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die as “an explosive peak-experience refrain that comes direct from heaven’s songbook”.

In a 2001 review for the 30th anniversary reissue of All Things Must Pass, James Hunter of Rolling Stone highlighted “Apple Scruffs” among other tracks on an album that “helped define the decade it ushered in”, advising listeners to “proceed to music that exults in breezy rhythms”, which included “the colorful revolutions of ‘What Is Life’ … bluesy and intricate on Harrison and Dylan’s ‘I’d Have You Anytime,’ fizzy on ‘Apple Scruffs,’ grooving on ‘Let It Down,’ and spookily proto-disco on ‘Art of Dying'”.

This record has a tendency to sound thin and shrill. If you wish to hear All Things Must Pass the way it should sound (and who doesn’t!) head over to HDtracks http://www.hdtracks.com/all-things-must-pass-215198 and buy the Audiophile 96kHz/24bit version of the 2014 remaster….amazing! George’s son Dhani had a large hand in the way this album was remastered and sounds and he nailed it…. his dad would be proud! *This video features the higher resolution 96/24bit HD FLAC version.

[Lyrics]
Now I’ve watched you sitting there
Seen the passers-by all stare
Like you have no place to go
But there’s so much they don’t know about Apple Scruffs

You’ve been stood around for years
Seen my smiles and touched my tears
How it’s been a long, long time
And how you’ve been on my mind, my Apple Scruffs

Apple Scruffs, Apple Scruffs
How I love you, how I love you

In the fog and in the rain
Through the pleasures and the pain
On the step outside you stand
With your flowers in your hand, my Apple Scruffs

While the years they come and go
Now, your love must surely show me
That beyond all time and space
We’re together face to face, my Apple Scruffs

Apple Scruffs, Apple Scruffs
How I love you, how I love you

“Looks like a little brother to the sun… or mother to the stars at night”

Here Comes The Moon – George Harrison (1979) FLAC Audio 4k ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Here Comes The Moon” was released in the winter of 1979 on George Harrison’s seventh solo album, George Harrison. The Beatles recorded George’s masterpiece “Here Comes The Sun” on their Abbey Road album, and 10 years later he recorded an equally beautiful track for “the little brother to the sun”.

Several years back, when I was making the video for “Your Love Is Forever”: https://youtu.be/pY9TX_Q7j-o I though it might be interesting to try a similar one for “Here Comes The Moon”…took me awhile but I finally got around to it. This video is stylistically the “night” video to that earlier video. I hope you enjoy the result.

A new George Harrison album was always an exciting and memorable event when I was growing up and each one (as with the other Beatle solo albums) brings distinctive memories of very specific times, places, people and emotions of my youth. I had been in awe of George’s previous album, 33&1/3 and was thrilled to finally hear that he had a new album. It was my last year of high school and I took a friend along with me hauling some cattle to a ranch near Corpus Christi for my dad on a Saturday. I was more than happy to make the trip because I knew it would allow me a chance to get into a city to a record shop and pick up George’s new album. Though the trip wouldn’t normally take me thorough San Antonio, I made a detour to the route and picked up both the album, cassette, AND! a great promo poster for the LP (In those days I was very skilled at convincing record store employees to give me promo material! LOL!, of course once I started working at one the next year such material became much more available and….yes, I still have that poster!). To this day every time I listen to this album (which is often, btw) I think of the hassles of driving that cattle trailer through the city and then happily listening to this album on cassette with my friend as I winded through the Texas countryside with the blue sky, white puffy clouds and sunshine above us!

This is the 23rd video I’ve made for a George Harrison song (and the 4th from the George Harrison album).

From Wiki: With Harrison’s penchant for leisure and travel following Thirty Three & 1/3’s release, he had not started recording a follow-up until mid-1978, although he had been writing songs during his hiatus. Teaming up with a co-producer for the first time in years, Harrison decided to use Russ Titelman to help realise the music for George Harrison, which was recorded at his home studio, entitled Friar Park, with string overdubs being effected at London’s AIR Studios. Special guests included Steve Winwood, Gary Wright (who co-wrote “If You Believe”) and Eric Clapton.

The album was previewed by the single “Blow Away”, which reached No. 51 in the United Kingdom and No. 16 in the United States. George Harrison received positive reviews upon its February 1979 release. It reached No. 39 in the UK and it peaked at No. 14 in the US, going gold. “Blow Away” as a single was also successful in Canada, peaking at No. 7 on the singles chart. Harrison’s increasing efforts, however, were being directed towards the film industry, having formed Handmade Films in order to help his friends in Monty Python complete Life of Brian.

Anyway…..till next one…..hope you enjoy this one!

As always, HUGE THANKS to everyone who’s art made this new art possible. THANK YOU!!!

[Lyrics]
Everybody’s talking up a storm
Act like they don’t notice it
But here it is and here it comes
Here comes the moon, the moon, the moon, the moon, the moon.
Impulse always quickens when it’s full
As it turns my head around me
Yes it does and here it comes
Here comes the moon, the moon, the moon, the moon, the moon.
God’s gift I see that’s moving up there into the night
Though dark the mirror in the sky reflects us our light:
Looks like a little brother to the sun
Or mother to the stars at night
And here it is and here it comes
Here comes the moon, the moon, the moon, the moon, the moon.
Breath is always taken when it’s new
Enhance upon the clouds around it
Yes it is and here it comes
Here comes the moon, the moon, the moon.

To hear your wonderous stories.

Wonderous Stories – Yes (1977) 192Khz/24bit FLAC ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Wonderous Stories” was released on Yes’ eight studio album, Going for the One, on 15 July 1977. This is my second video for a track from the Going For The One album (I did the title track way way back; check it if you dare; https://youtu.be/ZR1koTw5NqI ), and one of numerous Yes videos I’ve made. I haven’t uploaded any new Yes videos in a long time because all the ones I’ve made just seem to get buried and get very few views….I’ll try again, if there’s any interest I might update the ancient “Going For The One” and finish and upload more great tracks from Going For The One and other Yes albums? If you’re a Yes fan, please drop a like and a comment, maybe give it a share….it all helps. Thanks!

Since this is an album that I will ramble on about, I’ll just paste some of my notes on the album copied from the description of my old video for “Going For The One”:

“Going For The One” is the title track from Yes’s eighth studio album which was released in the summer of 1977. This is such a special record for me and I recall so clearly and strongly the circumstances of it’s release. I was a sophomore in high school and although I was well into my journey of seeking to listen to all the rock bands of the time, Yes was one of those bands that I knew really only by their singles. There was an extreme amount of anticipation, advertising, and awareness surrounding the pending new album from Yes.

A couple of weeks after buying the LP, I was flying out to Los Angeles with my family to spend six weeks with my dad who was working in the motion picture industry….I remember begging my mom to stop at a record store near the airport so I could pick up a few 8-tracks to play on my new (then KILLER! 😉 portable player for the flight and afterwards….I purchased Going For The One, Animals, Low, I Robot, Trans-Europe Express and Little Queen (the first three I already had on LP, but I wasn’t about to spend the rest of the summer without them!). I still associate some of these records with that summer in LA, especially Going For The One.

From Wiki:
“Wonderous Stories” is the second track on the album solely written by Anderson. He wrote the song during “a beautiful day” while living in Switzerland, “one of those days you want to remember for years afterwards”. During the day, the lyrics to the track entered his mind that he later wrote down. He noted the song’s meaning as “the joys of life, as opposed to the uptightedness of some aspects of life” that was inspired by romantic stories and “a kind of dream sequence”. White contributed the idea of the drums and bass playing on odd beats.[

The album was recorded in Montreux, Switzerland after the band took a break in activity for each member to release a solo album and their 1976 North American tour. It marks the departure of keyboardist Patrick Moraz and the return of Rick Wakeman, who had left to pursue his solo career after musical differences surrounding Tales from Topographic Oceans (1973). In a departure from their previous three albums, Going for the One features shorter and more direct songs written without a unifying theme or concept, and saw Yes record with new producers, engineers and cover designers.

Going for the One received a mostly positive response from music critics who welcomed the band’s return to more accessible music like their earlier albums The Yes Album (1971) and Fragile (1971). It was a commercial success and reached number one on the UK Albums Chart, their second album to do so, for two weeks and peaked at number 8 on the US Billboard 200. “Wonderous Stories” and “Going for the One” were released as singles; the former went to number 7 in the UK which remains the band’s highest charting single. Going for the One was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for 500,000 copies sold in the US. Yes supported the album with a six-month tour of North America and Europe.

[Lyrics]
I awoke this morning
Love laid me down by a river.
Drifting I turned on upstream
Bound for my forgiver.
In the giving of my eyes to see your face.
Sound did silence me
Leaving no trace.
I beg to leave, to hear your wonderous stories.
Beg to hear your wonderous stories.

He spoke of lands not far
Or lands they were in his mind.
Of fusion captured high
Where reason captured his time.
In no time at all he took me to the gate.
In haste I quickly checked the time.
If I was late I had to leave to hear your wonderous stories.
Had to hear your wonderous stories.

Hearing
Hearing
Hearing your wonderous stories.
Hearing your wonderous stories.
It is no lie I can see deeply into the future.
Imagine everything
You’re close
And were you there to stand
So cautiously at first and then so high.
As he spoke my spirit climbed into the sky.
I bid it to return
To hear your wonderous stories.
Return to hear your wonderous stories.

Hearing,
Hearing,
Hearing,
Hearing,
Hearing,