You say tomato, I say Tormato

Madrigal – Yes (1978) 192KHz/24bit FLAC 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Madrigal” was released on Yes’ ninth studio album, Tormato, in September of 1978. This is a beautiful tune from the album that features Rick Wakeman playing a Thomas Goff harpsichord. Hoping to get a couple more videos I’ve started for other tracks from Tormato finished soon. This one features a few clips (I’ve enhanced HDR levels for more vibrancy) from Lech Majewski’s wonderfully gorgeous and unusual 2011 film, The Mill and The Cross which is a movie surrounding and set-inside the painting The Way to Calvary (1564) by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. I absolutely love the imagery this film creates, check it out if you’ve not seen it.

Frow Wiki:
It is their last album recorded with singer Jon Anderson and keyboardist Rick Wakeman prior to their departure from the group in 1980. After wrapping their tour in support of their previous album, Going for the One (1977), the band gathered in London in February 1978 to record a new album. The band encountered several issues that hindered its potential including their overall direction, the decision to produce it by themselves, and its uneven quality.

Tormato received a mixed critical reception upon release, but was a commercial success. It peaked at No. 8 in the UK and No. 10 in the US. “Don’t Kill the Whale” was released as a single in the UK which reached No. 36. Tormato continued to sell in the US and is certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America for selling over one million copies. Yes supported the album with the commercially successful 1978–79 tour with concerts performed in the round. Tormato was remastered for CD in 1994 and 2004; the latter contains several previously unreleased tracks from the album’s recording sessions.

As with Going for the One, the album’s cover was designed by Hipgnosis but retains the band’s logo designed by Roger Dean. Howe pitched the album’s original title of Yes Tor, referring to Yes Tor, the second highest hill on Dartmoor, an area of moorland in Devon, England. Wakeman claimed to have thrown a tomato at the pictures taken for the album as he recalled the band were disappointed with the initial artwork which had cost a lot of money. The album’s title and cover was changed accordingly. Wakeman said the album became a “tragedy” as it had poor artwork and production, but good music. Howe said it was someone at Hipgnosis who threw the tomato on purpose, something that he felt insulted about. According to White, the band “couldn’t decide on the cover. I think Po … put a picture of a guy with divining sticks on the front. He took it home one night and decided it wasn’t working. So he threw a tomato at it”.

The sleeve includes a photograph of the band that was taken in Regent’s Park, London, with each member wearing a bomber jacket and sunglasses and looking in a different direction. Each jacket was labelled with the member’s name on the front, but Squire had forgotten his and had to wear one labelled “Jim”, belonging to tour manager Jim Halley. The word “Chris” was then drawn onto the final cover.

[Lyrics]
I will be there said my friend of a distant life
Covered in greens of a golden age, set in stone
Follow me “he sounded of dreams supreme” follow me
Drifting within the glow and the after-glow of the eve

And if that firelight, I could match the inner flame

Sacred ships do sail the seventh age

Cast off your garments of fear, replace them with love
Most of all play with the game of the age
Highest of places remain all as one with you
Giving us light and the freedom of the day

And if that firelight, I could match the inner flame

Sacred ships do sail the seventh age
And have always been here

Celestial travelers have always been here with us
Set in the homes of the Universe we have yet to go
Countless expansions will arrive and flow inside of us
My friend, he of fantasy, dancing with the spirit of the age