“And we talked about the strength of dreams”

“Song of Seven” was the title track from Jon Anderson’s 2nd solo album, released in November 1980 on Atlantic Records.

This album was was very special for me back in my college days. I used to play it very frequently in-store at Record Town back when it was released in 1980. This song in particular is has always been a favorite for me. As a huge Yes fan, I still think the song as a whole stands with some of their best work…..and I’d go even further by stating the section beginning at 3:50 stands equal to anything the band ever did…it’s extraordinarily beautiful. I used to play this section over and over and I still think it’s one of the most gorgeous pieces of music I’ve ever heard.

I came across a short video maybe a year ago from 2004 called “Demon” from director Irina Evteeva and knew immediately I’d want to use it in a video. But first the video resolution was pretty poor and wouldn’t look too good even in it’s original resolution (not to mention trying to spread it out to 1080p)….and second, exactly which song should I use it in? I worked out the first by processing the video through After Effects with various tools and effects. I was very surprised that I was actually able to achieve such great results….I think it was the style of the original video that allowed me to improve it so much, but it definitely looks great now! (Seems a waste not to use the effort to show the film in it’s full edit…there is no dialog and the soundtrack is basically some piano and classical arrangements….not nearly as impressive as the video. I may end up sharing it later.) Choosing which song to edit it to took me even more time; I wanted to use it on a big popular tune as it had such a stylish and special look and I wanted it to be seen. I tried it to several epic songs (one in particular it worked pretty well with, I’ll maybe drop that edit later)….I kept coming back to “Song of Seven” because i liked how it worked….knowing that such an obscure tune wouldn’t get the views, but who knows, maybe the video edit will give both the song and the film more exposure and appreciation? Enjoy. Thanks!

Song of Seven was released during Anderson’s first hiatus from Yes and supported by his first solo tour. “Some Are Born”, “Days”, “Everybody Loves You” and “Hear It” were originally written and demoed during the Tormato sessions. The “Some Are Born” and “Days” demo versions from these sessions were included as bonus tracks on the 2004 CD reissue of Tormato.

Another track from the Song of Seven Album:
“Days” https://youtu.be/qSQHTFxY7Eo

[Lyrics]
In the meeting place I sit beside, betwixt the points of heaven
I befell a friendly atmosphere revolving around seven
Oh, that number mystified my soul and captured within feelings
Those of doubt and understanding, hand in hand they set me reeling

Met me a stranger, he came here to town
Bearing gifts full of promises, discoveries of light
Said me many reasons why my merry tale
Could be justified and just both together entwined

I tell you a reason, he said, “Bless you, you fool, you fool”
You want “so belief,” yet you want so much more,” you seeker
Now I see you’re baffled, yet again you administer fear
Of the unexpected, you don’t know the score

Everywhere you look you release parts of your senses
And everywhere there’s purpose in answer to all your dreams
I can hear you saying what a dreamer, what a fool to life
Isn’t it a pity that he won’t come back to earth

Haven’t you imagination, and is it not available
How you can be sooner or later than your thinking
Haven’t you imagination and is it so impossible
That you ask of everything so your eyes can see clearly

So in an instant your story bound
A desert, the underground, on mountains high
A glacier, the heat of the day

City jungle, the sky at night
In space on a starry night
An atmosphere impossible
So you never really care

So we talk about the strength of dreams
And we talked at length of every dream
And we talked about the strength of dreams
And we talked about the strength of dreaming

In the meeting place I sit beside, betwixt the points of heaven
I befell a friendly atmosphere revolving around seven
Oh, that number mystified my soul and captured within feelings
Those of doubt and understanding, hand to hand they set me reeling

In the seventh dream to stand alone
But not without the strength of love
To guide our way, everyday

Oh, the seventh dream, your smile can bring
Love on and on and time will flow forever clear
The seventh dream standing so near
And very soon we’ll walk with love
Love that I can sing to you, you, you

Is it this time of day that makes me realise
The sun is coming out to shine again tomorrow, tomorrow
Is it this time of day that gives you hope

Is it this time of times that comes between the light
Are there so many dreamers in this life between a moment’s time
And the stairways of love, the starlight, the starlight
Telling me that there’s something else to cling on to, cling on to

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As life goes drifting by Like a breeze she’ll gently sigh

For My Lady – The Moody Blues (1972) 192khz/24bit FLAC 4K Video

“For My Lady” was the third track on the 1st side of The Moody Blues’ eighth studio album, Seventh Sojourn, which was released in October 1972. This is one of my favorite tracks from the fantastic Seventh Sojourn album.

This video was one of those start and finish in one setting efforts. Although I had a video version started years ago, so long ago that I couldn’t remember what was going on it , so I just grabbed a few of the first images and video clips that I thought might fit….some of the choices would be easy to marginally improve, but I was determined to make what I had work. I hope you enjoy the deelio! Thanks for checking it out!

The opening track, Mike Pinder’s “Lost in a Lost World” laments the brutality of revolution and references racial tension. Several songs contain overt political references. “You and Me,” like “Question” from two years earlier, alludes to ongoing wars and conflicts, including Vietnam. However, although the album showcases political concerns, in the 1990 documentary The Moody Blues: Legend of a Band, bassist John Lodge described “I’m Just a Singer (In a Rock and Roll Band)” as a response to fans who mistakenly read guru-like wisdom into the Moodies’ lyrics. Instrumentally, singer/keyboardist Mike Pinder, in addition to the Mellotron, used a similar keyboard device called the Chamberlin.

eventh Sojourn reached #5 in the United Kingdom, and became the band’s first American chart topper, spending five weeks at #1 to close out 1972.

Two hit singles came from this album: “Isn’t Life Strange” (#13 UK, #29 US) and “I’m Just a Singer (In a Rock and Roll Band)” (#36 UK, #12 US). However, both songs were overshadowed by the re-release of “Nights in White Satin,” which had been first released in 1967. Whereas both singles from Seventh Sojourn made the top 40, “Nights In White Satin” bested both, hitting #9 in the UK and #2 in the United States and gaining the highest American chart position for a Moody Blues single.

As this album proved difficult to record, with a 1973 follow-up quickly shelved after inception, the group decided to go on hiatus after their tour of Asia in 1974 (Mike Pinder’s last tour with the group), before reuniting in 1977 for Octave (1978) and its subsequent tour, albeit without Pinder.

In April 2007 the album was remastered into SACD format and repackaged with four extra tracks. “Island”, the fourth bonus track, was recorded in 1973 and is an incomplete recording of one of the songs that were intended to be released on the aforementioned follow-up record.

In 2008 a remaster for standard audio CD was issued with the same bonus tracks.

[Lyrics]
My boat sails stormy seas
Battles oceans filled with tears
At last my port’s in view
Now that I’ve discovered you
Oh I’d give my life so lightly
For my gentle lady
Give it freely and completely
To my lady
As life goes drifting by
Like a breeze she’ll gently sigh
And slowly bow her head
Then you’ll hear her softly cry.
Oh I’d give my life so lightly
For my gentle lady
Give it freely and completely
To my lady
Words that you say when we’re alone
Though actions speak louder than words
But all I can say is I love you so
To drive away all my hurt
Oh I’d give my life so lightly
For my gentle lady
Give it freely and completely
To my lady
Set sail before the sun
Feel the warmth that’s just begun
Share each and every dream
They belong to everyone.
Oh I’d give my life so lightly
For my gentle lady
Give it freely and completely
To my lady

Like a mountain river bleeding

Here Again – Rush (1974) 24-bit/192 kHz HD FLAC 4k Video

“Here Again” was released on Rush’s eponymous debut studio album that was released on March 1, 1974. The album has been since been remastered, first in 1997, and again in 2011. This video features a 24-bit/192 kHz HD FLAC that was sourced when the album was remastered for vinyl in 2015 as a part of the official “12 Months of Rush” promotion. The high definition master prepared for this release was also made available for purchase in 24-bit/96 kHz and 24-bit/192 kHz formats, at several high-resolution audio online music stores. These masters have significantly less dynamic range compression than the 1997 remasters and the “Sector” remasters.

The album was released on the band’s own label Moon Records in Canada and by Mercury Records in the United States and internationally. Their first release shows much of the hard rock sound typical of many of the popular rock bands emerging earlier in the decade. Rush were fans of such bands as Led Zeppelin and Cream, and these influences can be heard in most of the songs on the album.

Original drummer John Rutsey performed all drum parts on the album, but was unable to go on extended tours because of complications with his diabetes and so he retired from the band after the album was released. Rutsey contributed to the album’s lyrics, but never submitted the work to the other members of the band. The lyrics were instead entirely composed by Lee and Lifeson. Rutsey was soon replaced by Neil Peart, who remained the band’s drummer as well as their primary lyricist.

This video is an update of an older one I made for “Here Again” is not only my favorite song on the debut, but also one of my all-time Rush favorites as well. I turned the tunnel effect up to 11 (from only a 10 on the old video)….when you think 10 is enough, it’s great to be able to crank it 1 more and get more effect! 😉 I haven’t been able to get into vids much lately so I find myself mostly drawn to tinkering with upgrades for the ancients. Thanks as always for checking ’em out….hope you enjoy!

[Lyrics]
I said i played this song
So many times before
That the melody keeps repeating
Growing new ideas
Flowing chords and notes
Like a mountain river bleeding

Well, i say as i look back
And all the thoughts i’ve had
They reflect just what i’m learning
Yes, you know that the hardest part
Yes, i say it is to stay on top
On top of a world forever churning

Well, you say you can laugh
But i can see that your eyes are glass
Well, do you see, can’t you see, what i’m feeling?
Yes, i’ve seen your face before
Why, i’ve seen it everywhere
Showing up to me without a scent revealing

Well, i said will it ever change?
Will it stay the same?
I’d surely like to know before it’s over
Well, i said i played some
I said it won’t be long
Won’t be long before i stop and play it over

Oh, oh i’ve, i’ve seen your face before
Is it ever gonna, ever gonna change again?
Oh, oh i’ve, i’ve been in one place too long
Is it ever gonna, ever gonna change again?

The Trees – Rush (1978) Audio Fidelity SACD FLAC Remaster HD 1080p

The Twilight Zone – Rush (1976) HD FLAC https://youtu.be/ibIb2C7rbfI

Afterimage – Rush (1984) HD FLAC

Losing It – Rush (1982) FLAC Remaster 1080p

“2112” – Rush (1976) HD FLAC

Rush – Witch Hunt (1981) (Remaster) [1080p HD]

Rush – The Trees (1978) (Remaster) [1080p HD]

Rush – Cygnus X-1 Book I:The Voyage (1977) (Remaster) [1080p HD]

Rush – A Passage To Bangkok (1976) (Remaster) [720p HD]

Rush – Here Again (1974) (Remaster) [1080p HD]

Tears – Rush (1976) (2012 Deluxe Remaster) HD 1080p

Soon these days shall pass away

Cheyenne Anthem – Kansas (1976) FLAC HD Video

“Cheyenne Anthem” was a track on Kansas’ fourth studio album, Leftoverture, which was released just before Halloween 1976. This was the band’s first album to be certified by the RIAA, and remains their highest selling album, having been certified 4 times platinum in the United States.

I’ve always loved this song, especially the majestic final instrumental section (starting at 5:48 just after the lyric “In the ground our bodies lay, here we’ll stay”……I think it’s the piano playing that hits the hardest. Beautiful work.

I’ve been pretty inactive with my video uploads lately due to the hard drive failure that I’d mentioned in the previous video description. “Cheyenne Anthem” was the video I was working on when everything went south. Bad news was that I had to pick up with an older version of this work , and had to recreate some sequences that I’d already finished…..even before the crash this was an epic, tricky one to make (the time changes! the tone changes!), and I really couldn’t get into trying to recreate what I’d lost. As finished, the video is all over the map and I think I’ll try and tie the styles together better at some point with an update in the future, but for now it’s either upload the damn thing or put it on a shelf for a long, long break! 😉 The good news is I was able to recover almost all of the almost 3 years of work files that I’d not backed up! YIKES! I don’t think I would have been uploading many videos after losing all that work, so many updates and new videos I thought were gone forever….now I’m excited that hundreds of my works in progress will survive to see the light of day after all! We live to rock another day, rockers!!! 😉 Thanks to you all for being here with me and I hope you enjoy this one.

Steve Walsh began to experience writer’s block prior to the recording, and his contribution to the album would ultimately be limited to co-authoring three songs. It fell on Kerry Livgren to fill the void. The new compositions retained much of the classically inspired complexity of Livgren’s previous work. Kansas recorded the album at Studio in the Country in Bogalusa, Louisiana. The Studio in the Country was so named because, as Livgren described on In the Studio with Redbeard radio show in the episode spotlighting Leftoverture, “it was in the middle of a swamp. We’d walk out of the studio and there would be gators in front of the studio, mosquitos the size of B-52s and at times armadillos would run into the control room, laughing.”

Leftoverture opens with the song “Carry On Wayward Son”, which Livgren wrote as a sequel to “The Pinnacle”, the final song from the previous album Masque (1975).

The album’s title, Leftoverture, is a portmanteau word.

The album was met with mixed reviews. Rolling Stone called Leftoverture Kansas’s best album to date, and said that it “warrants Kansas a spot right alongside Boston and Styx as one of the fresh new American bands who combine hard-driving group instrumentation (with a dearth of flashy solos) with short, tight melody lines and pleasant singing.” The magazine Playboy reviewed the album as “extremely strong” and lauded Kansas for representing “the solid, Midwestern values of our vast musical heartland.” In contrast, Robert Christgau said the album lacked the intelligence and conviction of European progressive rock, and that the self-deprecating humor implied in the song and album titles is completely absent from the record itself.

Modern reviews are likewise mixed. Gary Graff found Leftoverture “Kansas’ breakthrough album and a thorough representation of its assorted musical sensibilities.” The AllMusic reviewer instead wrote that the album contains “neither hooks nor true grandiosity to make it interesting” and, despite the great single “Carry On Wayward Son”, the fact that Kansas “never manage to rival it anywhere on this record is as much a testament to their crippling ambition as their lack of skills.”

[Lyrics]
[Robby Steinhardt:]
From the mountains to the sun, Life has only just begun
We wed this land and pledge our souls to meet its end
Life has only just begun
Here my people roam the earth, in the kingdom of our birth
Where the dust of all our horses hides the sun
We are mighty on the earth, on the earth

[Steve Walsh:]
You have come to move me, take me from my ancient home
Land of my fathers I can’t leave you now
We will share it with you, no man owns this earth we’re on

Now the wheels are rolling hear the howling winds of war
It’s my destiny to fight and die
But is there no solution, can we find no other way, Lord let me stay
Under the endless sky and the earth below
Here I was born to live and I will never go, oh no

[Choir:]
But we cannot endure like the earth and the mountains
Life is not ours to keep, for a new sun is rising

[Robby Steinhardt:]
Soon these days shall pass away, for our freedom we must pay
All our words and deeds are carried on the wind
In the ground our bodies lay, here we’ll stay

Lights of Taormina – Mark Knopfler (2015)

Lights of Taormina – Mark Knopfler (2015) 192kHz/24bit HD FLAC Audio

“Lights of Taormina” was released in March 2015 on Mark Knopfler’s eighth solo album, Tracker. Mark is such an amazing songwriter and guitarist and I’m happy to support his continued solo work which never fails to satisfy. Lots of solo stuff that I’d love to video. Recently uploaded vids for a couple of tracks from his latest album, decided to make this my third video for a tune from his last album. Hope you enjoy and thank for watching!

“Lights of Taormina” reflects Mark Knopfler’s knack for writing on the road and turning his experiences there into music. “Over the years I’ve learned to write on the go,” he told Billboard magazine.

Knopfler added that he started writing this song, “where I was actually sitting on this beautiful terrace, looking down at Taormina.”
The popular tourist destination of Taormina is a small town on the east coast of the island of Sicily, Italy. Knopfler played at Taormina’s ancient Greek theater on July 16, 2013.

Some believe that Knopfler was looking down on Taormina from Hotel Villa Angela, which is owned by Jim Kerr, the lead singer of Simple Minds. Kerr fell in love with the island of Sicily when he visited on tour, and later set up the hotel, which is set on a hillside above Taormina.

From Wiki:
According to the review aggregator website Metacritic, Tracker received generally favorable reviews, achieving a critical score of 70 based on 15 critic reviews. In his review for AllMusic, Stephen Thomas Erlewine gave the album three and a half out of five stars, noting that the album is “scaled smaller” than his previous double-album effort Privateering, “easing its way into being instead of announcing itself with a thunder”.Knopfler isn’t pining for the past but he is looking back, sometimes wistfully, sometimes with a resigned smile, and he appropriately draws upon sounds that he’s long loved.

In his review for American Songwriter, Hal Horowitz gave the album four out of five stars, observing:

Touches of Celtic, jazz, country and folk, but seldom rock, inform these lovely tunes that take their time as if on a leisurely stroll … He’s in no hurry telling these colorful stories that unspool slowly and deliberately. Like much of Van Morrison’s best work, the relaxed pace provides the consistent thread that makes this a cohesive album instead of a batch of songs. The softly dignified pace, immaculately constructed lyrics and especially the immediately identifiable slithering guitar lines” all work to create “timeless songs that feel organic, measured and are clearly heartfelt as Knopfler crafts music that will sound as magnificent in 50 years as it does today.”

In his review for Rolling Stone, Will Hermes gave the album three and a half out of five stars, calling it “modest” and “multifaceted”. Hermes noted, “Knopfler’s quicksilver guitar is understated, and he delivers stories of stoic ache like an old watchmaker on a pub stool—quietly riveting.”

In his review for The Telegraph, Neil McCormick gave the album three out of five stars, acknowledging the work’s “understated refinement”, but noting it “lacks the epic scope of Dire Straits”. According to McCormick, there is a predictability to the album that undermines its effectiveness, noting, “Fans will find much to enjoy here, but it might be time for Knopfler to push himself out of his comfort zone.”

[Lyrics]
There’s laughter in the darkness
Music floating in across the bay
He’s half listening and wondering
How he could have let her slip away
So long ago but still he wants to know
If anyone has seen her
And he’s sitting out in the night
Looking down upon the lights of Taormina

They were young and love was shining
Like the colours of the rainbow
Desire felt like choking
Love was smoking under the volcano
He can still taste her kisses
Sweet as the red wine from Messina
Now he’s sitting out in the night
Looking down upon the lights of Taormina

Seems like another lifetime
When they rambled along the shore
Seems like another lifetime
She used to call him her sweet senor
Maybe in another lifetime
On a pathway to the sea
Maybe there they’ll be

The crowd calls for the emperor
Raise their hands to hail another king
But he’s been so long a wanderer
Another crowd can never mean a thing
He came, he saw, he conquered
Ten thousand voices roared in the arena
Now he’s sitting out in the night
Looking down upon the lights of Taormina

He hears the chimes of history
Myths of gods and men forever ringing
Ancient dreams in all their mystery
Wars for Sicily and Spartan women
In the mists of antiquity
Ships of war set sail from Carthagina
Now he’s sitting out in the night
Looking down upon the lights of Taormina
Sitting out in the night
Looking down upon the lights of Taormina

Hello, baby hello

Harmony – Elton John (1973) Blu-ray High Fidelity Pure Audio FLAC HD 1080p

“Harmony” was released in October 1973 on Elton John’s seventh studio album, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road. Every song on this album is an example of perfectly constructed pop/rock ….amazing EJ vocals, brilliant Bernie songwriting, a crack band at the top of it’s form, and glorious production.

Many years ago, I set out to make a video for every song from this album….I made several, and then petered out. Recently I had decided to dust-off a couple I’d started and finish them, and to update the old ones, and then maybe stay on track and finish the album. That was the plan. I had a video for “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” scheduled to be my next upload….however when I tried to access the files one night to finish the video, I realized that I wouldn’t be skipping down the yellow brick road for awhile because the files were all inaccessible because the drive was unreadable due to a critical drive failure.

This hard-drive crash for was for my primary work drive loaded with videos that were in various stages of completion….bummed to think I lost countless hours of effort and numerous nearly complete productions….so many effects that I’d worked up that, most of which I’ll never take the time to re-create. That drive is out for recovery, but much of the data will be lost. I thought seriously about letting my last upload be my last, and roll up the MetalGuruMessiah carpet. Decided to wait on the results from the data recovery to see what’s next….in the meantime, I rebuilt one of the easier efforts that was on the lost drive…a drag to spend time on something I’d already spent time on!? 😦 I’m not very good a backing up data, but usually get around to it….how in the world did I go 3 years without a backup of my primary production drive? Fingers crossed on the recovery.

The album sold over 12 million copies worldwide, and is regarded as one of John’s best. It was recorded at the Château d’Hérouville in France after problems recording at the intended location of Jamaica. Among the 17 tracks, the album contains the hits “Candle in the Wind”, “Bennie and the Jets”, “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” and “Saturday Night’s Alright for Fighting” plus “Funeral for a Friend/Love Lies Bleeding” and “Harmony”.

The move to the château from Jamaica provided John and his band with a great deal of creative inspiration, and an abundance of quality material was produced, leading to the decision to release the work as a double album (LP).

In 2003, the album was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. The album was ranked number 91 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time, and number 59 in Channel 4’s 2009 list of 100 Greatest Albums.

[Lyrics]
Hello, baby hello
Haven’t seen your face for a while
Have you quit doing time for me
Or are you still the same spoiled child

Hello, I said hello
Is this the only place you thought to go
Am I the only man you ever had
Or am I just the last surviving friend that you know

Harmony and me
We’re pretty good company
Looking for an island
In our boat upon the sea
Harmony, gee I really love you
And I want to love you forever
And dream of the never, never, never leaving harmony

Hello, baby hello
Open up your heart and let your feelings flow
You’re not unlucky knowing me
Keeping the speed real slow
In any case I set my own pace
By stealing the show, say hello, hello

It’s too late, you dabblers, it’s all too late

 

Beryl – Mark Knopfler (2015) 192kHz/24bit HD FLAC Audio 4K Video

“Beryl” was released in March 2015 on Mark Knopfler’s eight solo album, Tracker. I really wish Mark would release another album with Dire Straits (give us some rock, Mark!), but even if he never does, he is an amazing songwriter and guitarist and I’m happy to support his continued solo work which never fails to satisfy. Lots of solo stuff that I’d love to video….so doing a couple of my favorites from his last album. Hope you enjoy and thank for watching!

Dame Beryl Margaret Bainbridge DBE (21 November 1932 – 2 July 2010) was an English writer from Liverpool. She was primarily known for her works of psychological fiction, often macabre tales set among the English working class. Bainbridge won the Whitbread Awards prize for best novel in 1977 and 1996; she was nominated five times for the Booker Prize. She was described in 2007 as “a national treasure”. In 2008, The Times named Bainbridge on their list of “The 50 greatest British writers since 1945”.

From Wiki:
According to the review aggregator website Metacritic, Tracker received generally favorable reviews, achieving a critical score of 70 based on 15 critic reviews. In his review for AllMusic, Stephen Thomas Erlewine gave the album three and a half out of five stars, noting that the album is “scaled smaller” than his previous double-album effort Privateering, “easing its way into being instead of announcing itself with a thunder”.Knopfler isn’t pining for the past but he is looking back, sometimes wistfully, sometimes with a resigned smile, and he appropriately draws upon sounds that he’s long loved.

In his review for American Songwriter, Hal Horowitz gave the album four out of five stars, observing:

Touches of Celtic, jazz, country and folk, but seldom rock, inform these lovely tunes that take their time as if on a leisurely stroll … He’s in no hurry telling these colorful stories that unspool slowly and deliberately. Like much of Van Morrison’s best work, the relaxed pace provides the consistent thread that makes this a cohesive album instead of a batch of songs. The softly dignified pace, immaculately constructed lyrics and especially the immediately identifiable slithering guitar lines” all work to create “timeless songs that feel organic, measured and are clearly heartfelt as Knopfler crafts music that will sound as magnificent in 50 years as it does today.”

Ken Capobianco, in his review for the Boston Globe, gave the album a positive review, writing, “Mark Knopfler continues his late-career resurgence with this skillfully crafted eighth solo effort, revealing a portrait gallery of quotidian and accomplished lives marked by yearning and reflection.” Capobianco praised Knopfler’s overall effort “delivering finely wrought, elegantly arranged songs of subtle depth and rich musicality”. In his review for Rolling Stone, Will Hermes gave the album three and a half out of five stars, calling it “modest” and “multifaceted”. Hermes noted, “Knopfler’s quicksilver guitar is understated, and he delivers stories of stoic ache like an old watchmaker on a pub stool—quietly riveting.”

In his review for The Telegraph, Neil McCormick gave the album three out of five stars, acknowledging the work’s “understated refinement”, but noting it “lacks the epic scope of Dire Straits”. According to McCormick, there is a predictability to the album that undermines its effectiveness, noting, “Fans will find much to enjoy here, but it might be time for Knopfler to push himself out of his comfort zone.” Ally Carnwath, in her review for The Guardian, also gave the album three out of five stars, observing a “predictable whiff of whiskey and rolling tobacco” about the effort. While Carnwarth notes Knopfler’s inconsistency as a storyteller, she believes his music “remains a reliable source of warm bluesy guitarwork”. In his review for Popmatters, John Garrett gave the album six out of ten stars, concluding, “It’s hard to nail down a specific identity for Tracker. The quality of each song is consistently good, but the album doesn’t feel very cohesive when you step back to consider the whole package.”

[Lyrics]
Beryl was on another level
When she got a Booker medal
She was dead in her grave
After all she gave
After all she gave
Beryl, every time they’d overlook her
When they gave her a Booker
She was dead in her grave
After all she gave
After all she gave
It’s all too late now
It’s all too late now
It’s too late, you dabblers, it’s all too late
It’s too late, you dabblers, it’s all too late
Beryl, the tobacco overtook her
When they gave her a Booker
She was dead in her grave
After all she gave
After all she gave
It’s all too late now
It’s all too late now
It’s too late, you dabblers, it’s all too late
It’s too late, you dabblers, it’s all too late
Beryl was on another level
When she got a Booker medal
She was dead in her grave
After all she gave
After all she gave
After all she gave
After all she gave

 

 

Green Is The Colour – Pink Floyd (1969)

Green Is The Colour – Pink Floyd (1969) FLAC Audio 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Green is the Colour” was released in June 1969 Pink Floyd’s third studio album, Soundtrack from the film More. The song was composed and written by Roger Waters and sung by David Gilmour. A tin whistle is heard in the song, played by drummer Nick Mason’s then-wife Lindy. It seems that many people might be even happier than usual to spring roll around this year, I know I’ll be very happy to see some green return to my world. I’ve always loved this tune, though the album less so. Thanks for checking it out!

More is a psychedelic rock soundtrack album that contains some acoustic folk ballads, a genre that appeared sparsely on Pink Floyd’s later works. It also contains some of the band’s “heaviest” recordings, such as “The Nile Song” and “Ibiza Bar”, as well as several instrumental tracks, featuring their experimental and avant-garde approach. More was primarily filmed on location on Ibiza where most of the story takes place. It was the directorial debut for Barbet Schroeder. Roger Waters has stated that the song is “about being on Ibiza” the setting of the film, More.

This is Pink Floyd’s first full album without founding member Syd Barrett, who was ousted from the group in early 1968 during the recording of A Saucerful of Secrets. It is one of the three Pink Floyd albums to feature David Gilmour as the sole lead vocalist, the others being 1987’s A Momentary Lapse of Reason and 2014’s The Endless River. It is the only album in the band’s discography not to have a lead vocal from Roger Waters during his tenure in the band.

[Lyrics]
Heavy hung the canopy of blue
Shade my eyes and I can see you
White was the light
That shines through the dress that you wore
She lay in the shadow of a wave
Hazy were the visions overplayed
Sunshine in her eyes
But moonshine made her cry everytime
Green is the colour of her kind
Quickness of the eye
Deceives the mind
Envy is the bond between
The hopeful and the damned

Long as I remember, the rain been comin’ down.

Who’ll Stop The Rain – Creedence Clearwater Revival (1970) 96KHz/24bit FLAC ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Who’ll Stop The Rain” was released on Creedence Clearwater Revival’s fifth studio album, Cosmo’s Factory, on Fantasy Records in July of 1970. I’ve been working on a couple other “rain” videos, but decided to use some quick effects for this beautiful CCR tune so I could upload it on Veterans Day 2017. Thanks to all the vets who have served our great country….and to Creedence for their songs which so wonderfully captured the spirit of the Vietnam conflict and American experience related to it.

I love CCR as much as the next guy (and who doesn’t really? there can be no possible reason for not liking this band!) and I’ve wanted to make a few vids for some of the many great songs (how to choose!?) that are my favorites….one down! 😉 This was a VERY quick effort and I didn’t take the usual amount of time and effort to scrub and clean the low-res vid sources I used (mainly the Woodstock stuff)….plus I knew I should take the time to find some Vietnam footage of soldiers in the rain to tie in, but….it’s a shorter song, and I had enough to fill it out very quickly. Maybe for a future update, I’ll make those adjustments and raise the level of the video a notch? This video does feature 96KHz/24bit FLAC audio though!

Cosmo’s Factory was released the same month as the single release of “Lookin’ Out My Back Door” with “Long as I Can See the Light” on the B side. The name of the album comes from the warehouse in Berkeley where the band rehearsed early in their career. It was dubbed “The Factory” by drummer Doug “Cosmo” Clifford, because bandleader John Fogerty made them practice there almost every day.

With the release of Cosmo’s Factory in July 1970, Creedence Clearwater Revival hit their commercial zenith. It was their fifth album in two years and became an international smash, topping the album charts in six countries. The band also toured Europe in 1970, playing the Royal Albert Hall to enthusiastic audiences, and had emerged as the most popular band in America by largely ignoring the trippy acid rock indulgences that were typical of the era. However, despite the band’s infectious blend of rockabilly, folk, and R&B, some peers and rock critics dismissed them as a singles band with no substance. In a 2012 cover story, Uncut observed, “While San Francisco longhairs across the bridge scoffed at their commercialism, Creedence henceforth made a point of releasing double A-sides. And invariably both songs would have an uncanny knack of cutting through to all sections of the population.” Singer and guitarist Fogerty, who had seemingly arrived out of nowhere, but had actually struggled with his bandmates throughout most of the 1960s as the Blue Velvets and the Golliwogs, composed the group’s songs and generally steered the band artistically, although his grip on the band – including his dubious role as manager – irritated the others, especially his older brother Tom Fogerty, who left the band by the end of 1970.

In its original review, Rolling Stone opined, “It should be obvious by now that Creedence Clearwater Revival is one great rock and roll band. Cosmo’s Factory, the group’s fifth album, is another good reason why.” AllMusic states, “On ‘Long as I Can See the Light’, the record’s final song, he again finds solace in home, anchored by a soulful, laid-back groove. It hits a comforting, elegiac note, the perfect way to draw ‘Cosmo’s Factory’ – an album made during stress and chaos, filled with raging rockers, covers, and intense jams – to a close.” An editorial review from Amazon.com calls the album “the peak of a prolific streak.”

[Lyrics]
Long as I remember,
The rain been comin’ down.
Clouds of myst’ry pourin’
Confusion on the ground.
Good men through the ages
Tryin’ to find the sun.
And I wonder,
Still I wonder
Who’ll stop the rain.

I went down Virginia,
Seekin’ shelter from the storm.
Caught up in the fable,
I watched the tower grow.
Five-year plans and new deals
Wrapped in golden chains.
And I wonder,
Still I wonder
Who’ll stop the rain.

Heard the singers playin’,
How we cheered for more?
The crowd had rushed together
Tryin’ to keep warm.
Still the rain kept pourin’,
Fallin’ on my ears.
And I wonder,
Still I wonder
Who’ll stop the rain.

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You say tomato, I say Tormato

Madrigal – Yes (1978) 192KHz/24bit FLAC 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Madrigal” was released on Yes’ ninth studio album, Tormato, in September of 1978. This is a beautiful tune from the album that features Rick Wakeman playing a Thomas Goff harpsichord. Hoping to get a couple more videos I’ve started for other tracks from Tormato finished soon. This one features a few clips (I’ve enhanced HDR levels for more vibrancy) from Lech Majewski’s wonderfully gorgeous and unusual 2011 film, The Mill and The Cross which is a movie surrounding and set-inside the painting The Way to Calvary (1564) by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. I absolutely love the imagery this film creates, check it out if you’ve not seen it.

Frow Wiki:
It is their last album recorded with singer Jon Anderson and keyboardist Rick Wakeman prior to their departure from the group in 1980. After wrapping their tour in support of their previous album, Going for the One (1977), the band gathered in London in February 1978 to record a new album. The band encountered several issues that hindered its potential including their overall direction, the decision to produce it by themselves, and its uneven quality.

Tormato received a mixed critical reception upon release, but was a commercial success. It peaked at No. 8 in the UK and No. 10 in the US. “Don’t Kill the Whale” was released as a single in the UK which reached No. 36. Tormato continued to sell in the US and is certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America for selling over one million copies. Yes supported the album with the commercially successful 1978–79 tour with concerts performed in the round. Tormato was remastered for CD in 1994 and 2004; the latter contains several previously unreleased tracks from the album’s recording sessions.

As with Going for the One, the album’s cover was designed by Hipgnosis but retains the band’s logo designed by Roger Dean. Howe pitched the album’s original title of Yes Tor, referring to Yes Tor, the second highest hill on Dartmoor, an area of moorland in Devon, England. Wakeman claimed to have thrown a tomato at the pictures taken for the album as he recalled the band were disappointed with the initial artwork which had cost a lot of money. The album’s title and cover was changed accordingly. Wakeman said the album became a “tragedy” as it had poor artwork and production, but good music. Howe said it was someone at Hipgnosis who threw the tomato on purpose, something that he felt insulted about. According to White, the band “couldn’t decide on the cover. I think Po … put a picture of a guy with divining sticks on the front. He took it home one night and decided it wasn’t working. So he threw a tomato at it”.

The sleeve includes a photograph of the band that was taken in Regent’s Park, London, with each member wearing a bomber jacket and sunglasses and looking in a different direction. Each jacket was labelled with the member’s name on the front, but Squire had forgotten his and had to wear one labelled “Jim”, belonging to tour manager Jim Halley. The word “Chris” was then drawn onto the final cover.

[Lyrics]
I will be there said my friend of a distant life
Covered in greens of a golden age, set in stone
Follow me “he sounded of dreams supreme” follow me
Drifting within the glow and the after-glow of the eve

And if that firelight, I could match the inner flame

Sacred ships do sail the seventh age

Cast off your garments of fear, replace them with love
Most of all play with the game of the age
Highest of places remain all as one with you
Giving us light and the freedom of the day

And if that firelight, I could match the inner flame

Sacred ships do sail the seventh age
And have always been here

Celestial travelers have always been here with us
Set in the homes of the Universe we have yet to go
Countless expansions will arrive and flow inside of us
My friend, he of fantasy, dancing with the spirit of the age