Daylight is good at arriving at the right time

All Things Must Pass – George Harrison (1970) HD FLAC ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“All Things Must Pass” was the title track on George Harrison’s massive musical monument, the 3-album All Things Must Pass album, which was released in late November of 1970.

I”ve long been chipping away at videos for both “All Things Must Pass” and “Isn’t It A Pity” (among others from the album). I’ve done a couple other vids for songs from this album, but I can never quite finish the other ones I’ve started because some of my favorite songs are so closely related thematically that I can never decide which video I’m working on. I wanted The Beatles imagery for “Isn’t It A Pity” and liked the clocks and foggy forests for “All Things Must Pass”. (The blackbird effect is from my long blocked video of “Blackbird”) Though his song wasn’t written specifically about The Beatles’ breakup (as was George’s sad reflective “Isn’t It A Pity), but many people hear it as such (the cover image of the four gnomes laying around solo George sitting in a chair!)….and it definitely fits! Anyway the imagery I’d found working on the different songs looked too cool together to pass up, so I mashed ’em together and here is “All Things Must Pass” via “Isn’t It A Pity” version! Stand by for “Isn’t It A Pity” (both versions!)….soon, maybe?! πŸ˜‰

From Wiki:
The subject matter deals with the transient nature of human existence, and in Harrison’s All Things Must Pass reading, words and music combine to reflect impressions of optimism against fatalism. On release, together with Barry Feinstein’s album cover image, commentators viewed the song as a statement on the Beatles’ break-up. Widely regarded as one of Harrison’s finest compositions, its rejection by his former band has provoked comment from biographers and reviewers. Music critic Ian MacDonald described “All Things Must Pass” as “the wisest song never recorded by The Beatles”, while author Simon Leng considers it “perhaps the greatest solo Beatle composition”.

The Catskill Mountains in upstate New York – surroundings that inspired the music of the Band, and Harrison’s song “All Things Must Pass” For his lyrics, Harrison drew inspiration from “All Things Pass”, a poem published in Timothy Leary’s 1966 book Psychedelic Prayers after the Tao Te Ching. In his 1980 autobiography, I Me Mine, Harrison refers to the idea for the song originating from “all kinds of mystics and ex-mystics”, including Leary. Like later Harrison compositions such as “Here Comes the Sun”, “So Sad” and “Blow Away”, the lyrical and emotional content is based around metaphors involving the weather and the cycle of nature. Harrison states in the opening lines of verse one: “Sunrise doesn’t last all morning / A cloudburst doesn’t last all day”.

According to Harrison biographer Simon Leng, the lyrics reflect “life’s ephemeral character” and the “transitory” nature of love. Inglis suggests that the song is “[o]stensibly” about “the end of a love affair”. He and theologian Dale Allison note the optimism offered in Harrison’s words, since, as Leng puts it, “a new day always dawns.” Although “All Things Must Pass” avoids religiosity, Allison writes that its statement on the “all-inclusive” transience of things in the material world explains why so much of its 1970 parent album, All Things Must Pass, “finds hope and meaning only in God, who does not pass away”. The song’s main message is offered in its middle eight:

All things must pass
None of life’s strings can last
So I must be on my way
And face another day.

Ultimately, the cycle of nature offers “consolation”, Leng writes, as further evidenced in the verse-three lines “Now the darkness only stays at night time” and “Daylight is good at arriving at the right time”.

This record has a tendency to sound thin and shrill. If you wish to hear All Things Must Pass the way it should sound (and who doesn’t!) head over to HDtracks http://www.hdtracks.com/all-things-must-pass-215198 and buy the Audiophile 96kHz/24bit version of the 2014 remaster….amazing! George’s son Dhani had a large hand in the way this album was remastered and sounds and he nailed it…. his dad would be proud! *This video features the higher resolution 96/24bit HD FLAC version.

[Lyrics]
Sunrise doesn’t last all morning
A cloudburst doesn’t last all day
Seems my love is up and has left you with no warning
It’s not always going to be this grey

All things must pass
All things must pass away

Sunset doesn’t last all evening
A mind can blow those clouds away
After all this, my love is up and must be leaving
It’s not always going to be this grey

All things must pass
All things must pass away
All things must pass
None of life’s strings can last
So, I must be on my way
And face another day

Now the darkness only stays the night-time
In the morning it will fade away
Daylight is good at arriving at the right time
It’s not always going to be this grey

All things must pass
All things must pass away
All things must pass
All things must pass away

“You don’t need no rosary beads or them books to read…” George Harrison “Awaiting On You All” (1970)

Awaiting On You All – George Harrison (1970) 24bit FLAC Remaster HD Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Awaiting On You All” was released in late November of 1970 on George Harrison’s massive musical monument, the 3-album All Things Must Pass. This was George’s first album in the commercial sense and to say he knocked it out of the park would be an understatement.

This video is taken from the performance of the song at the Concert For Bangladesh with new effects and set to the studio version of the song. I kinda rushed this one out when my last one was blocked from viewing. (Typically I remove blocked vids, package them for later upload, and renumber the replacement video)….in this case Video #425 (a cleanup/widescreen of George’s “Crackerbox Palace” promo..with HD FLAC!) is sitting happily blocked from view, but I’m going to leave it and hope for the best…eventually. πŸ˜‰

I was blown away by the sound of the 2014 remaster of All Things Must Pass! It’s wonderful to finally be able to hear this album very close to the way I remember my old vinyl…..it’s just such a difficult and complex sound to get right, based on the way Phil Spector produced it to sound. In the wrong hands it will always sound shrill and thin….I swear if anyone wants to hear All Things Must Pass the way it should sound (and who doesn’t)….BUY the CD so you can get the full uncompressed version. George’s son Dhani had a large hand in the way this album was remastered and sounds and he nailed it…. his dad would be proud! *This video features the higher resolution 96/24bit HD FLAC version.

All Things Must Pass is epic in every sense of the word, and if you were young enough to miss it, and have somehow managed to still not have heard it (and if you’re a serious rock and roll music fan) this album (well two thirds of it anyway, the jams on the 3rd record I listened to exactly once)….you have committed a grave error and I suggest you make amends immediately, find this album and release yourself unto the majesty of what still stands as the greatest solo record ever released by any of The Beatles….John and Paul of course released their share of strong, brilliant albums, but really nothing that can compare to the sheer scale of this record. It has a timeless quality to it and it’s brilliance burns bright through the passing years.

As usual HUGE THANKS to everyone who’s art made this new art possible….THANK YOU!!!!! And of course, thank YOU! for watching!

[Lyrics]
You don’t need no love in
You don’t need no bed pan
You don’t need a horoscope or a microscope
The see the mess that you’re in
If you open up your heart
You will know what I mean
We’ve been polluted so long
Now here’s a way for you to get clean

By chanting the names of the lord and you’ll be free
The lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see
Chanting the names of the lord and you’ll be free
The lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see

You don’t need no passport
And you don’t need no visas
You don’t need to designate or to emigrate
Before you can see Jesus
If you open up your heart
You’ll see he’s right there
Always was and will be
He’ll relieve you of your cares

By chanting the names of the lord and you’ll be free
The lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see
Chanting the names of the lord and you’ll be free
The lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see

You don’t need no church house
And you don’t need no Temple
You don’t need no rosary beads or them books to read
To see that you have fallen
If you open up your heart
You will know what I mean
We’ve been kept down so long
Someone’s thinking that we’re all green

And while the Pope owns 51% of General Motors
And the stock exchange is the only thing he’s qualified to quote us
The lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see
By chanting the names of the lord and you’ll be free

Try to get a message through And get back out of this material world

Living In The Material World – George Harrison (1973) FLAC Remaster HD 1080p ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Living In The Material World” was the title track of George Harrison’s fourth studio album, Living In The Material World, which was released in the spring of 1973.

I’ve done numerous videos for tracks from this album so not much left to say about it, except to repeat; after all these years, it’s beauty still strikes me…and if the second US single “Don’t Let Me Wait Too Long” hadn’t been cancelled (who gets credit for that stupid decision?! Surely not George?)….the album would have been able to gain more of the attention it deserved.

Stephen Leng describes the record as “one of the most keenly anticipated discs of the decade” and its unveiling “a major event”. Among expectant music critics, Stephen Holden began his highly favorable review in Rolling Stone with the words “At last it’s here”, before hailing the new Harrison album as a “pop classic” and a “profoundly seductive record”. “Happily, the album is not just a commercial event,” he wrote, “it is the most concise, universally conceived work by a former Beatle since John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band.” Billboard magazine noted the twin themes found throughout the album – “the Beatles and their mish-mash” versus a “spiritual undercoat” – and described Harrison’s vocals as “first-rate”.

Music critic Graham Reid remarked that “Harrison is not a great wordsmith but he is a superb musician. Everything flows, everything interweaves. His melodies are so superb they take care of everything …”

Biographers Carr and Tyler lauded Harrison’s “superb and accomplished slide-guitar breaks”, and the solos on “Give Me Love”, “The Lord Loves the One”, “The Light That Has Lighted the World” and “Living in the Material World” have each been identified as exemplary and among the finest of Harrison’s career.

In his book The Beatles Apart (1981), Woffinden wrote: “Those who carped at the lyrics, or at Harrison himself, missed a great deal of the music, much of which was exceptionally fine.” Woffinden described the album as “a very good one”.

In the decades following its release, Living in the Material World gained a reputation as “a forgotten blockbuster” and an underrated masterpiece.

Reviewing the 2014 reissue, Blogcritics’ Chaz Lipp writes that “this chart-topping classic is, in terms of production, arguably preferable to its predecessor”, adding: “The sinewy ‘Sue Me, Sue You Blues,’ galloping title track, and soaring ‘Don’t Let Me Wait Too Long’ rank right alongside Harrison’s best work.” Classic Rock reviewer, Paul Trynka writes: “All these years on, it’s his most overtly spiritual album that sparkles today … The well-known songs, such as ‘Sue Me, Sue You Blues”, stand up well, but it’s the more restrained tracks – ‘Don’t Let Me Wait Too Long’, ‘Who Can See It’ – that entrance: gorgeous pop songs, all the more forceful for their restraint.”

Leng has named the album as his personal favorite of all of Harrison’s solo albums. According to Leng, with its combination of a defiant “protest” song in “The Day the World Gets ‘Round”, the anti-stardom “The Lord Loves the One”, and “perfect pop confections” in “Give Me Love” and “Don’t Let Me Wait Too Long”, Living in the Material World was the last album to capture the same clear-sighted, Utopian spirit that characterized the 1960s.

Eder likewise welcomes Material World’s bold idealism, saying: “Even in the summer of 1973, after years of war and strife and disillusionment, some of us were still sort of looking – to borrow a phrase from a Lennon–McCartney song – or hoping to get from them something like ‘the word’ that would make us free. And George, God love him, had the temerity to actually oblige …”

[Lyrics]
I’m living in the material world
Living in the material world

can’t say what I’m doing here
But I hope to see much clearer,
after living in the material world

I got born into the material world
Getting worn out in the material world
Use my body like a car,
Taking me both near and far
Met my friends all in the material world

Met them all there in the material world
John and Paul here in the material world
Though we started out quite poor
We got ‘Richie’ on a tour
Got caught up in the material world

From the Spiritual Sky,
Such sweet memories have I
To the Spiritual Sky
How I pray
Yes I pray
that I won’t get lost
or go astray

As I’m fated for the material world
Get frustrated in the material world
Senses never gratified
Only swelling like a tide
That could drown me in the
material world

From the Spiritual Sky,
Such sweet memories have I
To the Spiritual Sky
How I pray
Yes I pray
that I won’t get lost
or go astray

While I’m living in the material world
Not much ‘giving’ in the material world
Got a lot of work to do
Try to get a message through
And get back out of this material world

I’m living in the material world
Living in the material world
I hope to get out of this place
by the LORD SRI KRSNA’S GRACE
My salvation from the material world

“He’s the master of going faster”

Faster – George Harrison (1979) FLAC Remaster HD Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Faster” was released in the winter of 1979 on George Harrison’s seventh, self-titled solo album, George Harrison.

This is the 3rd video I’ve made for a George Harrison song (George must be the artist I’ve made the most videos for!) from this album ….after “Your Love Is Forever” https://youtu.be/pY9TX_Q7j-o and “Blow Away” https://youtu.be/C5jY0w-wS_o

This video is the promo video with color adjustments and clean-up, presented in widescreen and synced to a FLAC remaster of the track from the Dark Horse Years box set. It sounds great and the video is now officially the best on YouTube! Yah! πŸ˜‰

I’ve rambled on about the album on the other videos I’ve made for songs from it, so I’ll just say….it’s another classic George Harrison effort full of classic George Harrison sounding songs! πŸ˜‰ Hope you enjoy another great George Harrison track!

From Wiki: With Harrison’s penchant for leisure and travel following Thirty Three & 1/3’s release, he had not started recording a follow-up until mid-1978, although he had been writing songs during his hiatus. Teaming up with a co-producer for the first time in years, Harrison decided to use Russ Titelman to help realise the music for George Harrison, which was recorded at his home studio, entitled Friar Park, with string overdubs being effected at London’s AIR Studios. Special guests included Steve Winwood, Gary Wright (who co-wrote “If You Believe”) and Eric Clapton.

The album was previewed by the single “Blow Away”, which reached No. 51 in the United Kingdom and No. 16 in the United States. George Harrison received positive reviews upon its February 1979 release. It reached No. 39 in the UK and it peaked at No. 14 in the US, going gold. “Blow Away” as a single was also successful in Canada, peaking at No. 7 on the singles chart. Harrison’s increasing efforts, however, were being directed towards the film industry, having formed Handmade Films in order to help his friends in Monty Python complete Life of Brian.

Three of the songs from the eponymous album were included on Harrison’s Best of Dark Horse 1976–1989 compilation: “Blow Away,” an edited version of “Here Comes the Moon,” and the single edit version of “Love Comes to Everyone.” “Blow Away” was also included in the career-spanning compilation Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison.

In 2004, George Harrison was remastered and reissued both separately and as part of the deluxe box set The Dark Horse Years 1976-1992 on Dark Horse with new distribution by EMI, adding the bonus track demo version of “Here Comes the Moon”, recorded just after it was written in Hawaii.

As always, HUGE THANKS to everyone who’s art made this new art possible. THANK YOU!!!

[Lyrics]
Chose a life in circuses
Jumped into the deepest end
Pushing himself to all extremes
Made it, people became his friend

Now they stood and noticed him
Wanted to be a part of it
Pulled out some poor machinery
So he worked ’til the pieces fit

The people were intrigued
His wife held back her fears
The headlines gave acclaim
He’d realized their dreams

Faster than a bullet from a gun
He is faster than everyone
Quicker than the blinking of an eye
Like a flash you could miss him going by
No one knows quite how he does it
But it’s true, they say
“He’s the master of going faster”

Now he moved into the space
That the special people share
Right on the edge of do or die
Where there is nothing left to spare

Still the crowds came pouring in
Some had hoped to see him fail
Filling their hearts with jealousies
Crazy people with love so frail

The people were intrigued
His wife held back her fears
The headlines gave acclaim
He’d realized their dreams

Faster than a bullet from a gun
He is faster than everyone
Quicker than the blinking of an eye
Like a flash you could miss him going by
No one knows quite how he does it
But it’s true, they say
“He’s the master of going faster”

No need to wonder why
His wife held back her fears
So few have even tried
To realize their dreams

Faster than a bullet from a gun
He is faster than everyone
Quicker than the blinking of an eye
Like a flash you could miss him going by
No one knows quite how he does it
But it’s true, they say
“He’s the master of going faster”

No one knows quite how he does it
But it’s true, they say
“He’s the master of going faster”

So ring out the old Ring in the new

Ding Dong, Ding Dong – George Harrison (1974) FLAC Audio 1080p Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Ding Dong, Ding Dong” was released in December 1974 on George Harrison’s fifth solo album, Dark Horse. I’ve been updating my old George videos and decided to take a break from those and work the old promo video for this song to the high resolution remaster of the track from 2014.

What is there to say about “Ding Dong, Ding Dong”? It’s just a really fun track and George seemed to be having typical George fun making the video.

This video is the promo video synced to audio track from the amazing The Apple Years compilation box set that was released in 2014 and which featured George’s first six albums remastered…they are a huge sound improvement over the earlier releases. The video is stretched to widescreen format and I did some minor adjustments to improve it a bit. Hope you enjoy….a 1, 2! πŸ˜‰

Dark Horse received some of the most negative reviews of any release by a Beatle up to that point and the worst of Harrison’s career. Released amid the furor surrounding his refusal to play “Beatle George during a tour that was a “whirlwind of pent-up Beatlemania”, in Leng’s words, it was as if Harrison had already committed “acts of heresy”. Rather than having his new work judged on its own merits, it was “open season” on Harrison, another biographer, Elliot Huntley, has written of the “tsunami of bile” unleashed on the ex-Beatle in late 1974.

Under the heading “Transcendental Mediocrity”, Jim Miller of Rolling Stone called Dark Horse a “disastrous album” to match the “disastrous tour”, and a “shoddy piece of work”. According to Miller, the musicians were “merely competent studio pros” and Harrison’s guitar playing was “rudimentary”. In contrast with the praise that the same publication had lavished on Harrison for Living in the Material World the year before, Rolling Stone’s reviewer described Dark Horse as a “chronicle of a performer out of his element, working to a deadline, enfeebling his overtaxed talents by a rush to deliver new ‘LP product'”, and stated: “In plain point of fact, George Harrison has never been a great artist … the question becomes whether he will ever again become a competent entertainer.”

There were a number of positive reviews for Dark Horse, with Billboard magazine deeming it a “Spotlight” release. The reviewer described the album as “an excellent one” and compared it favorably with Harrison’s acclaimed 1970 triple set, All Things Must Pass. Brian Harrigan of Melody Maker credited Harrison with establishing “a new category in music – Country and Eastern” and lauded his “nifty” slide-guitar playing and “tremendous” singing. Although he found some of the tracks overlong, Harrigan declared: “Yep, the Sacred Cowboy has produced a good one.” Combined with his feature on the tour in Circus Raves, in which he questioned the accuracy of the negative reports about the Harrison–Shankar concerts, Michael Gross described Dark Horse as matching All Things Must Pass in quality, and “surpassing” it at times, thanks to the new album’s “clarity of production and lovely songs”. Gross highlighted “So Sad” as a “luxurious track” and described “Ding Dong, Ding Dong”, “Dark Horse” and “Far East Man” as “all, simply, good songs”.

Having previously championed Harrison’s work since 1970, Rolling Stone would not change its unfavorable verdict on Dark Horse over the ensuing decades, and Harrison never completely forgave the magazine for the treatment he received during this period. In 2002, writing in the Rolling Stone Press book Harrison shortly after his death, Greg Kot approved of Dark Horse’s “jazzier backdrops” compared with Material World, but opined that Harrison’s voice turned much of the album into an “unintentionally comic exercise”. In the same publication, Mikal Gilmore identified Dark Horse as “one of Harrison’s most fascinating works – a record about change and loss”. Alan Clayson similarly writes of the interest factor of “a non-Beatle, as well as an ex-Beatle in uncertain transition”, and while classing the album as “an artistic faux pas”, describes “It Is ‘He’ (Jai Sri Krishna)” as “wonderful” and “startling”.

[Lyrics]
Ring out the old
Ring in the new
Ring out the old
Ring in the new

Ring out the false
Ring in the true
Ring out the old
Ring in the new

Ding-dong, ding-dong
Ding-dong, ding-dong
Ding-dong, ding-dong
Ding-dong, ding-dong

Yesterday, today was tomorrow
And tomorrow, today will be yesterday
So ring out the old
Ring in the new
Ring out the old
Ring in the new

Ring out the false
Ring in the true
Ring out the old
Ring in the new

Ding-dong, ding-dong
Ding-dong, ding-dong
Ding-dong, ding-dong
Ding-dong, ding-dong

“Never seen such a beautiful girl…… Had me quickly untied”

Beautiful Girl – George Harrison (1976) FLAC Audio 1080p Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Beautiful Girl” was released in November 1976 on George Harrison’s seventh studio album, Thirty Three & 1/3.

After the disappointments of Dark Horse and Extra Texture over 1974–75, Thirty Three & 1/3 was widely viewed as a return to form for Harrison. The new album earned the artist his strongest reviews since All Things Must Pass (1970).

Billboard magazine described the release as “a sunny, upbeat album of love songs and cheerful jokes that is his happiest and most commercial package, with least high-flown postures, for perhaps his entire solo career”. The reviewer rated the production “top-notch” before concluding: “And Harrison’s often-spectacular melody writing gift gets brilliant display here.” In Melody Maker, Ray Coleman remarked on Warner Bros.’ need to re-establish Harrison, adding: “The question is merely whether the music [on Thirty Three & 1/3] merits it. Unequivocally, the answer is yes.” Coleman praised Harrison’s vocals on this “fine album” and likened the quality of his melodies to that on the Beatles’ 1965 album Rubber Soul.

In a review that author Michael Frontani terms “particularly laudatory”, Richard Meltzer of The Village Voice described Harrison’s new work as “his best LP since All Things Must Pass and on par with, say, [Bob Dylan’s] Blood on the Tracks”. Michael Gross wrote in Swank magazine that Harrison “seems with 33 1/3 to have come unstuck”, adding: “If the new record company, new girlfriend … Olivia Arias, and new disc have put him in a more secure place in the material world, he could well recapture his spot as the Beatle to watch.”

Less impressed, Rolling Stone continued to regard Harrison in an unfavourable light after what Elliot Huntley terms its “volte-face” in 1974. The magazine’s reviewer, Ken Tucker, noted the accessibility of “fast, cheerful numbers” such as “Woman Don’t You Cry for Me” and “This Song” but lamented both “George’s persistent preaching” elsewhere and that Scott’s presence rendered the album as “music with the feeling and sincerity of cellophane”. NME critic Bob Woffinden admired Harrison’s guitar playing but dismissed him as a lyric writer, before concluding: “Harrison’s general demeanour is more encouraging … While it is an album of no particular merit in itself, it is one which leads me to believe that his best work may not necessarily be behind him.” Four years later, however, Woffinden offered a more positive assessment, writing that “His spiritual convictions no longer seemed to be cramping his style, but affording him a generous and open heart. An excellent production and frequently inspired guitar work were amongst the other positive qualities which the album could boast.”

In the 1978 edition of a book that traditionally promoted an unfavorable view on Harrison’s work, The Beatles: An Illustrated Record, authors Roy Carr and Tony Tyler described Thirty Three & 1/3 as Harrison’s “best effort – by far” since All Things Must Pass. Carr and Tyler concluded: “It must be the production. For no individual track really presents itself as typifying a New Harrison Approach – and yet the impression left by the album as a whole is definitely of a more balanced, poised and devil-may-care Hari …” Robert Christgau, another critic with a low regard for Harrison’s music,] gave Thirty Three & 1/3 the highest rating of all the ex-Beatle’s solo albums thus far, with a “B–”. Christgau wrote, “This isn’t as worldly as George wants you to think – or as he thinks himself, for all I know – but it ain’t fulla shit either”, and he highlighted “Crackerbox Palace” as Harrison’s best song since “Here Comes the Sun”.

[Lyrics]
Never seen such a beautiful girl
Got me shaking inside
Calling on me from deep within her eyes
Not the kind you go handing around
Want to keep her right there
But this love it don’t come as no surprise

And when I saw the way that she smiled at me
I knew it there and then that she was A 1
And then I felt the way she was touching me
Was something I had known I was waiting upon

Never seen such a beautiful girl
Had me quickly untied
Calling to me she made me realize
Not the kind that is lost or is found
She has always been there
A lover needed for this soul to survive

And when I saw the way that she smiled at me
I knew it there and then that she was A1
And when I felt the way she got through to me
Was something I had know I was waiting upon

Never seen such a beautiful girl
Got me shaking inside
Calling on me from deep within her eyes
Not the kind you go handing around
Want to keep her right there
But this love it don’t come as no surprise

“They live all their lives, without looking to see…The light that has lighted the world”

The Light That Has Lighted The World – George Harrison (1973) 24/96 FLAC HD Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“The Light That Has Lighted The World” was released on George Harrison’s fourth studio album, Living In The Material World, in the spring of 1973. I love every song on Living In The Material World, but “The Light That Has Lighted The World” may be my very favorite.

*Including the section of Wiki information that details how highly acclaimed this track is with many critics….just in case it’s greatness doesn’t hit you like a ton of bricks….read about it!

The song is viewed as a statement on Harrison’s discomfort with the attention afforded him as an ex-Beatle and features a prominent contribution from English session pianist Nicky Hopkins, along with a highly regarded slide guitar solo from Harrison.

“The Light That Has Lighted the World” is underpinned by Gary Wright’s stately harmonium and Harrison’s acoustic rhythm guitars, and is dominated by Hopkins’ piano. The instrumental section, in between the two verses, featuring first Hopkins and then Harrison, has received much positive comment.

Beatles biographer Alan Clayson also compliments Harrison’s slide-guitar work, writing of his “controlled grace” while “shining up the octaves” during the solo. Another biographer, Elliot Huntley, approves of the “grandiloquent ballad tone” of this and other songs on the album, and admires the “tasteful” rhythm section on “The Light That Has Lighted the World” and Harrison’s “jangling” acoustic guitars. Having interviewed Harrison for Guitar World magazine in 1987, Rip Rense has likened the guitar solo to that on the Beatles’ “Fixing a Hole”, as examples of how Harrison’s solos display “structure, syntax, and development” over “pyrotechnic flourishes”. Rense adds: “These are thoughtful and original, deceptively simple sounding, invested with feeling.” Writing for Goldmine in January 2002, Dave Thompson rated “The Light That Has Lighted the World” an “unquestioned highlight” and “a song hallmarked by distinct echoes of Lennon’s Imagine”.

In his review of the 2006 reissue of Living in the Material World, for Q magazine, Tom Doyle included the song among the album’s best three tracks and wrote: “the introspective moods of The Light That Has Lighted The World and Who Can See It, with their ornate instrumentation and weepy vocals, are lovely things.” Reviewing the 2014 Apple Years Harrison reissues, in Mojo, Doyle writes of Material World having “spotlit the spirituality and the dreaminess”, through “the gentle, non-preachy The Light That Has Lighted The World and Be Here Now, both great works of look-around-you wonder”.

Simon Leng views the mid-song soloing as a highlight: “a rolling, lilting passage from Nicky Hopkins, topped by one of Harrison’s finest performances,” he writes. “In the closing bars of the statement, repeated as the song’s coda, the guitar vocalizes a series of six-string sobs. George finally made his guitar gently weep.” While echoing Leng’s sentiments, Guitar World editor Damian Fanelli includes the slide soloing on his list of Harrison’s best post-Beatles “Guitar Moments”.

Unlike Leng, Ian Inglis views the lyrics as Harrison “[resisting] the temptation to criticize”, since instead the unenlightened “have his sympathy”. To Inglis, the song’s weakness is that the “light” Harrison is striving to see is never made clear; whether it’s love, spiritual enlightenment, or even the Beatles, “who, after all, have illuminated the world for many millions of people”. The meaning is clear to theologian Dale Allison, who sums it up as an “achingly beautiful” song that “expresses resentment toward those who dislike the ex-Beatle George but thanksgiving for those who reflect the light of God”.

I have many George Harrison videos started, but it’s been a conundrum as to which ones to finish first…and since I can’t decide, its been a long time since I got a new one uploaded. The thing is that so many of George’s songs share similar themes and lyrical content…they didn’t call him the “the spiritual one” for nothing (oh yeah, many fans called him “the quiet one” bs….he should be known as “the spiritual one”! ;-)….so anyway, I have lots of videos started and I working on one I find things that I really like, but then think, “wow..this would work better for song x”…so effects get shuffled round n round and not much gets finished.

[Lyrics]
I’ve heard how some people, have said
that I’ve changed
That I’m not what I was
How it really is a shame
The thoughts in their heads,
Manifest on their brow
Like bad scars from ill feelings
they themselves arouse
So hateful of anyone that is happy
or ‘free’
They live all their lives,
without looking to see
The light that has lighted the world

It’s funny how people, just won’t
accept change
As if nature itself – they’d prefer
re-arranged
So hard to move on
When you’re down in a hole
Where there’s so little chance,
to experience soul

I’m greatful to anyone,
that is happy or ‘free’
for giving me hope
while I’m looking to see

The light that has lighted the world

In The First Place – George Harrison (1968) FLAC Remaster HD Video

In The First Place – George Harrison (1968) FLAC Remaster HD Video

“In The First Place” was originally recorded during the sessions for the album Wonderwall Music, the soundtrack to a film that Geroge Recorded….it was the first solo record by George Harrison and also the first solo record of any of The Beatles.

I was never a huge fan of this album, but I’ve been listening to it quite a bit lately, and this video for “In The First Place” actually came about from a suggestion by a fan commenting on one of my other George Harrison videos. “In The First Place” was recorded by George and The Remo Four during the Wonderwall Music sessions being recorded for the film of the same name, but apparently George didn’t submit it for inclusion to the soundtrack because he believed the director only wanted instrumental works….AS IF someone would NOT want George Harrison singing a new composition (even if it wasn’t his own)?! πŸ˜‰

The remastering work presented on George’s early albums, as presented in The Apple Box (for which his son Dhani had lead role), was simply wonderful, but I’d spent most of my time with the better known albums and just kinda skimmed through Wonderwall Music. Then this person mentioned that I should do a video for “In The First Place”…of course I became curious as I didn’t remember the song from the original album and hadn’t really even paid much attention to it (as a bonus track for Wonderwall Music, I guess I expected more instrumental)…..but when I listened to it the first time after that suggestion….wow…..it was love at first listen! LOL! Seriously, this song, though written by The Remo Four features George vocal and production….and it’s just a brilliant bit of psychedelia, like a lost Harrison track from Sgt. Pepper or Magical Mystery Tour. I seriously love this track….HUGE thanks to that fan who gave me a clue (I’ll go back and find that comment and thank them proper….cause without that suggestion I doubt I’d ever hear this gem). Hope you find it as wonderwall as I do! πŸ˜‰

***There is quite a story behind this song and here’s the link to it:
http://abbeyrd.best.vwh.net/wonderwall.htm

I have to say that Wonderwall Music has gone from about a 1 star album for me previously to about a 3.5…I guess I’m just more mature now and can appreciate this type music more than when I was 21…..it’s got a lot of great things going on in it’s grooves too bad it took me so long to appreciate it more….and as with all the other titles in The Apple Years box it sounds superb now.

Wonderwall Music is the soundtrack album to the 1968 film Wonderwall It was the first album to be issued on the Beatles’ Apple record label. The songs are all instrumental pieces, except for occasional non-English vocals, and a slowed-down spoken word segment on the track “Dream Scene”. Harrison recorded the album between November 1967 and February 1968, with sessions taking place in London and the Indian city of Bombay. Following his Indian-styled compositions for the Beatles since 1966, he used the film soundtrack to further promote Indian classical music by introducing rock audiences to musical instruments that were relatively little-known in the West – including shehnai, sarod and santoor.

The album cover consists of a painting by American artist Bob Gill in which, as in director Joe Massot’s film, two contrasting worlds are separated by a wall, with only a small gap allowing visual access between them. Harrison omitted his name from the list of performing musicians, leading to an assumption that he had merely produced and arranged the music; the 2014 reissue of Wonderwall Music recognises his contributions on keyboards and guitar. The album was first remastered for CD release in 1992, for which former Apple executive Derek Taylor supplied a liner-note essay.

While viewed as something of a curiosity by rock music critics, Wonderwall Music is recognised for its inventiveness in fusing Western and Eastern sounds, and as being a precursor to the 1980s world music trend. The album’s title inspired that of Oasis’ 1995 hit song “Wonderwall”, and its music influenced the sound of Oasis’ fellow Britpop band Kula Shaker. Harrison’s full soundtrack for the film was made available on DVD in early 2014, as part of the two-disc Wonderwall Collector’s Edition. In September that year, the album was reissued in remastered form as part of the Apple Years 1968–75 Harrison box set, with the addition of three bonus tracks.

[Lyrics]
Day begins to crumble, Can’t believe my eyes,
Falling down and down and down, It comes as no surprise,

I begin to stumble, Losing my control,
Feeling like a blind man who is searching for his soul,

Never be the same,
Never be the same again,
Will it ever be the same again,
As it was in the first place,

Never be the same,
Never be the same again,
Will it ever be the same again,
As it was in the first place,

I’ve been feeling humble, Since you went away,
Now I feel there’s nothing left that’s right for me to say,

Blow Away – George Harrison (1979) HQ FLAC Remaster HD Video

Blow Away – George Harrison (1979) HQ FLAC Remaster HD Video

“Blow Away” was released in the winter of 1979 on George Harrison’s seventh solo album, George Harrison.

This is I believe the thirteenth video I’ve made for a George Harrison song (George must be the artist I’ve made the most videos for!) and the second from the 1979 album….after “Your Love Is Forever” https://youtu.be/pY9TX_Q7j-o

A new George Harrison album was always an exciting and memorable event when I was growing up and each one (as with the other Beatle solo albums) brings distinctive memories of very specific times, places, people and emotions of my youth. I had been in awe of George’s previous album, 33&1/3 and was thrilled to finally hear that he had a new album. It was my last year of high school and I took a friend along with me hauling some cattle to a ranch near Corpus Christi for my dad on a Saturday. I was more than happy to make the trip because I knew it would allow me a chance to get into a city to a record shop and pick up George’s new album. Though the trip wouldn’t normally take me thorough San Antonio, I made a detour to the route and picked up both the album, cassette, AND! a great promo poster for the LP (In those days I was very skilled at convincing record store employees to give me promo material! LOL!, of course once I started working at one the next year such material became much more available and….yes, I still have that poster!). To this day every time I listen to this album (which is often, btw) I think of the hassles of driving that cattle trailer through the city and then happily listening to this album on cassette with my friend as I winded through the Texas countryside with the blue sky, white puffy clouds and sunshine above us!

From Wiki: With Harrison’s penchant for leisure and travel following Thirty Three & 1/3’s release, he had not started recording a follow-up until mid-1978, although he had been writing songs during his hiatus. Teaming up with a co-producer for the first time in years, Harrison decided to use Russ Titelman to help realise the music for George Harrison, which was recorded at his home studio, entitled Friar Park, with string overdubs being effected at London’s AIR Studios. Special guests included Steve Winwood, Gary Wright (who co-wrote “If You Believe”) and Eric Clapton.

The album was previewed by the single “Blow Away”, which reached No. 51 in the United Kingdom and No. 16 in the United States. George Harrison received positive reviews upon its February 1979 release. It reached No. 39 in the UK and it peaked at No. 14 in the US, going gold. “Blow Away” as a single was also successful in Canada, peaking at No. 7 on the singles chart. Harrison’s increasing efforts, however, were being directed towards the film industry, having formed Handmade Films in order to help his friends in Monty Python complete Life of Brian.

Three of the songs from the eponymous album were included on Harrison’s Best of Dark Horse 1976–1989 compilation: “Blow Away,” an edited version of “Here Comes the Moon,” and the single edit version of “Love Comes to Everyone.” “Blow Away” was also included in the career-spanning compilation Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison.

In 2004, George Harrison was remastered and reissued both separately and as part of the deluxe box set The Dark Horse Years 1976-1992 on Dark Horse with new distribution by EMI, adding the bonus track demo version of “Here Comes the Moon”, recorded just after it was written in Hawaii.

Till next one…..hope you enjoy this one! Thanks for sharing your joy of music with me!

As always, HUGE THANKS to everyone who’s art made this new art possible…THANK YOU!!!

[Lyrics]
Day turned black, sky ripped apart
Rained for a year ’til it dampened my heart
Cracks and leaks
The floorboards caught rot
About to go down
I had almost forgot.

All I got to do is to love you
All I got to be is, be happy
All it’s got to take is some warmth to make it
Blow Away, Blow Away, Blow Away.

Sky cleared up, day turned to bright
Closing both eyes now the head filled with light
Hard to remember what a state I was in
Instant amnesia
Yang to the Yin.

All I got to do is to love you
All I got to be is, be happy
All it’s got to take is some warmth to make it
Blow Away, Blow Away, Blow Away.

Wind blew in, cloud was dispersed
Rainbows appearing, the pressures were burst
Breezes a-singing, now feeling good
The moment had passed
Like I knew that it should.

All I got to do is to love you
All I got to be is, be happy
All it’s got to take is some warmth to make it
Blow Away, Blow Away, Blow Away.

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You may not need it, but I’m giving you my “Wah-Wah” anyway.

Wah-Wah – George Harrison (1970) 2014 Audio Remaster HD 1080p Video

Wah-Wah” was released in late November of 1970 on George Harrison’s massive musical monument, the 3-album All Things Must Pass. This was George’s first album in the commercial sense and to say he knocked it out of the park would be an understatement.

I have begun videos for many of the tracks from All Things Must Pass (only one completed prior to this one though, “Run Of The Mill”) and there were a couple I thought I’d have finished before “Wah-Wah”, but when Phil Kenzie (the renowned rock and roll saxophone player most famous for his work with Al Stewart (insanely incredible solos on both “Year Of The Cat” and “Time Passages”) asked me to work something up for this track, I moved it to the top of the stack! πŸ˜‰

Anyway, “All Things Must Pass” is epic in every sense of the word, and if you were young enough to miss it, and have somehow managed to still not have heard it (and if you’re a serious rock and roll music fan) this album (well two thirds of it anyway, the jams on the 3rd record I listened to exactly once)….you have committed a grave error and I suggest you make amends immediately, find this album and release yourself unto the majesty of what still stands as the greatest solo record ever released by any of The Beatles….John and Paul of course released their share of strong, brilliant albums, but really nothing that can compare to the sheer scale of this record. It has a timeless quality to it and it’s brilliance burns bright through the passing years.

As usual HUGE THANKS to everyone who’s art made this new art possible….THANK YOU!!!!! And of course, thank YOU! for watching!

[Lyrics]
Wah-wah
You’ve given me a wah-wah
And I’m thinking of you
And all the things that we used to do
Wah-wah, wah-wah

Wah-wah
You may be such a big star
Being there at the right time
Cheaper than a dime
Wah-wah, you’ve given me your
Wah-wah, wah-wah

Oh, you don’t see me crying
Oh, you don’t hear me sighing

Wah-wah
I don’t need no wah-wah
And I know how sweet life can be
If I keep myself free, wah-wah
I don’t need no wah-wah

Oh, you don’t see me crying
Hey baby, you don’t hear me sighing
Oh, no, no, no, no

Wah-wah
Now I don’t need no wah-wahs
And I know how sweet life can be
If I keep myself free of wah-wah
I don’t need no wah-wah

Wah-wah, wah-wah, wah-wah
Wah-wah, wah-wah, wah-wah
Wah-wah, wah-wah

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