Don’t you know I’d come running I’d come running back to you again

Running Back – Thin Lizzy (1976) HD FLAC 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Running Back” was released in the spring of 1976 on Thin Lizzy’s sixth studio album, Jailbreak. This track was the first Thin Lizzy I ever started a video for…it’s one of my favorite songs they recorded. I’ve had a video for this song in progress for years, but could never figure out how to make it work. Happy I finally came across this video from Bill Plympton from 2008 called “The Love Race” that seemed to do the trick…just some very minor editing was required for the end result.

Initially, the song “Running Back” was chosen to be a single ahead of “The Boys Are Back in Town”, the latter being seen as possibly too aggressive for some radio stations to play. Frontman and songwriter Phil Lynott and producer John Alcock decided to employ session musicians to add more commercial elements to some of the tracks to try to produce a hit single, and Tim Hinkley was brought in to add keyboard parts to “Running Back”. Guitarist Brian Robertson was against the idea, as he liked the song as it had originally been arranged, in a blues format with his own additions of piano and bottleneck guitar. He later said, “I took enormous offence to [the changes]. I couldn’t understand why they’d pay this guy a fortune just for playing what he did. Listen to it and tell me it’s not bollocks.” Robertson did not play on the finished version of the song and Hinkley is not credited on the album sleeve. Lynott said at the time that “Running Back” was “very much influenced by Van Morrison. I really like that song.” Hinkley later recalled, “Robbo and Scott were not keen on it at all but they were overruled.” Thirty-five years later, Robertson recorded his own versions of the song on his 2011 album Diamonds and Dirt.

Scott Gorham also revealed that “Romeo and the Lonely Girl” was also brought up as an option for a single, but was ultimately discarded, as “nobody was overexcited about it.”

This album will always hold a very special place in my heart. It was released my freshman year and remained popular all through high school. It will forever be linked with those times and places in my memory….high school football games; drinking beer & partying in the boonies; 7 nights of the week on an endless cruise of the “loop” with friends, road-trips to the drive-in in another town (it wouldn’t last much longer); and lazing away the afternoons in the sun at the community pool. The great rock bands of the seventies (Thin Lizzy, Aerosmith, Blue Oyster Cult, Boston, Styx, Queen, Led Zepp, Pink Floyd, Rush, Scorpions, Kansas, Cheap Trick, and on….and on) made this a great time to grow up! If you went to high school in the seventies when all this incredible music was released, you know what I’m talking about. 😉

This is my second vid from the Jailbreak album, check out “Cowboy Song” if you’re so inclined: https://youtu.be/M8imbAh7P1MI

Plymptoons – The Complete Works of Bill Plympton
https://www.amazon.com/Plymptoons-Complete-Works-Bill-Plympton/dp/B00000ILG4/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1518907471&sr=8-1&keywords=bill+plympton+dvd

Stephen Thomas Erlewine of Allmusic described Jailbreak as a “truly exceptional album”, with “a dimension of richness that sustains, but there’s such kinetic energy to the band that it still sounds immediate no matter how many times it’s played”. Highlighting Lynott’s songs as “lovingly florid… crammed with specifics and overflowing with life”, he claimed that Gorham and Robertson’s guitar work is “intertwined, dual-lead guitar interplay that was one of the most distinctive sounds of ’70s rock”.

A reviewer for Sputnikmusic took the view that nearly every song on the album is “a pure, hard rocker with little to no flaws”, picking out the “killer groove” of “Angel from the Coast”, the “infamous” “The Boys Are Back in Town” and the “gritty” title track. He also claimed that “Cowboy Song” is “arguably one of the best songs Thin Lizzy ever produced”.

Thanks to my friends old and new for supporting the things I try….THANKS FOR WATCHING and for the thumbs up and shares!

As usual HUGE THANKS to everyone who’s art contributed to this new art…..THANK YOU!!!!

[Lyrics]
I’m a fool now that it’s over
Can you guess my name?
I make my money singing songs about you
It’s my claim to fame

When they say it’s over
It’s not all over, there’s still the pain

I’d come running
I’d come running back to you again
Oh I’d come running
I’d come running back to you again

If I said I was sorry
Would you still leave me?
I never thought you’d go ’till you did
Believe me

When they say it’s over
It’s not all over completely

‘Cause I’d come running
I’d come running back to you again
Yes I’d come running
I’d come running back to you again

I miss that girl

The show is over
and we must all go home
Just leave me by myself
I’ll be alright here on my own

If it’s all over, it’s all over
And I’m all alone

And I’d come running
I’d come running back to you again
Don’t you know I’d come running
I’d come running back to you again

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So much for this kind of love

So Much – Jack Green (1980) FLAC Audio 4k Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“So Much” was released on Jack Green’s debut solo album, Humanesque, in 1980. Haven’t had much time for vids lately…although there is quite a few of interesting things unfinished but getting closer…..until i find more time for those, here’s another quickie equalizer style vid for another great track from Jack Green’s Humanesque album…one of the greatest albums of the 70’s 80’s rock that you might have never heard.

I discovered this album when I was working at the record store. I recall we only received 3 copies of the album and no one knew who the artist was. I took a chance and opened a copy ——- (As I’ve mentioned in video descriptions before, I came across so much great music in this way….open a copy of an album and buy it if it was good or use the excuse that it was for in-store play …even if we didn’t like it and never played it…it happened! LOL!) —- and I remember liking it immediately, and the girl I worked with grabbed a second copy as we listened to it for the first time. Another employee bought the 3rd copy the next day. I played the hell out of it for weeks, and we special ordered some more, but never really met the demand that could be made by simply playing the album in the store….the manager would get so pissed off that I played things that we didn’t have in stock! This album was one of my favorites from the early eighties, and I’ve listened to it frequently for the last nearly 40 (ouch!) years!…still sounds as amazing as ever.

I took the FLAC audio from the CD release and equalized them for a bit more bass. I think the audio adjustment makes the tracks sound fuller with more bottom end, better, but they are just a hair under clipping and I need to give a more critical listening on my home system.

I started videos from this record over 6 years ago, but never worked them out, I really wanted to get some out so I decided to use my favorite cheat (the equalizer video! LOL!). This is my third video for a track from the album; see the first two, “I Call, No Answer” (featuring Richie Blackmore’s guitar) https://youtu.be/CQuO7zEH01Y and “This Is Japan” https://youtu.be/2CAXy1uUP3I

[Lyrics]
When you feel the distance form a poison around your soul
And all the words of love have turned into stone
Building a fortress around you on your own

So much for this kind of love
So much for this kind of love

You reach for answer always trying to understand
And every time you do it always slips from your hands
Building your dreams into an empty wasteland
So much for this kind of love

Liar don’t you feel the tension
How can we go on this way
Always fighting and forgetting
Who said love will never die?

In the beginning it was so open and warm
Now at the end it is so ragged and torn
Only time will tell what we went through
So much for me and you
So much for me and you
So much for me and you
me and you, alright
alright

In the beginning it was so open and warm
Now at the end it is so ragged and torn
Only time will tell what we went through
So much for me and you
So much for me and you
So much for me and you
me and you, alright
alright

alright
alright
alright

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Dust In The Wind – Kansas (1977)

Dust In The Wind – Kansas (1977) FLAC Audio 1080p Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

With at least 200 billion galaxies out there (and possibly even more), we’re very likely talking about a Universe filled with around 10 to the 24th planets, or, for those of you who like it written out, around 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 planets in our observable Universe.
I want to send my regards to everyone sharing this amazing one with me. All we are is dust in the wind…..love and spirit are the only thing that cannot be blown away. Peace, love n happiness y’all!

“Dust in the Wind” was released on Kansas’ fifth studio album, Point of Know Return, in October 1977. The track was hugely popular from the moment it was released, and rightfully so I believe as it is an outstanding melody with simple yet profound lyrics. Was hoping to get something for the New Year, and this seemed a good choice…not the fireworks I was thinking about, but a more reflective piece for starting the new year. Wishing you all a great 2018 and beyond!

This vid features FLAC audio from the Austria/Holland original CD release (which is less compressed than other CD versions….only slightly less than the original vinyl!)….once again, I’ve only barely nudged the equalizer to get what sounds best (IMO). Thanks for listening/watching/commenting/up-voting/adding to playlists/sharing…appreciate the support.

Think about giving a listen to another great Kansas track that always seemed to me kinda a continuation of this one. Where “Dust in the Wind” was about the earthly experience; “Ghosts” continued with the move into the spiritual experience; “Ghosts” from Kansas’ In The Spirit of Things album from 1988: https://youtu.be/pcbqPUOrdPI

My first video from Point of Know Return was “Portrait (He Knew)”…another fav Kansas tune, thinking I might push out an update for it soon: https://youtu.be/KwQJaBGc9Dk

From Wiki:
Singer/songwriter Steve Walsh left the group briefly. He would admit that, at this point, he had been something of a prima donna in an interview with nationally syndicated radio host Redbeard on the weekly rockumentary series In the Studio with Redbeard.

The album is critically acclaimed for singles like “Point of Know Return”. “Point of Know Return” was a later addition to the album. “Portrait (He Knew)” was written about Albert Einstein. In 1988, Livgren released an updated version of “Portrait (He Knew)” titled “Portrait II” as part of the album Prime Mover credited to his band AD. He changed the subject of the song from Einstein to Jesus Christ. “Closet Chronicles” is a Howard Hughes allegory.

“Dust in the Wind” is known for its sparse acoustic nature. The guitar line for the song was written by Kerry Livgren as a finger exercise for learning fingerpicking. His wife, Vicci, heard what he was doing, remarked that the melody was nice, and encouraged him to write lyrics for it. Livgren was unsure whether his fellow band members would like it, since it was a departure from their signature style. However he did offer it to them, and the song was accepted and then recorded.

Rolling Stone gave the album a mixed review, saying that though the transition to shorter songs generally works, the lyrics are “a wan and ridiculous rehash of the bargain-basement exoticism employed by the British art-rock crowd.” They commented that though the band lacks a virtuoso soloist, the band’s ensemble playing is strong and purposeful.

Point of Know Return would be Kansas’ highest charting album in the US, peaking at #4 in January 1978, and would sell four million copies in the US and be certified Quadruple Platinum by the RIAA.

During a debate of greatest “Song 1 Side 1” in history among the lead characters in the movie High Fidelity, Jack Black’s character criticizes one of John Cusack’s character’s proposals as “too obvious, like ‘Point of Know Return'”. The album cover has become an iconic image from the album rock era, appearing on the background of the set of VH1 Classic, on tee shirts worn by characters in movies and on TV, and in other places.

[Lyrics]
[Verse 1]
I close my eyes, only for a moment
And the moment’s gone
All my dreams pass before my eyes, a curiosity
Dust in the wind
All they are is dust in the wind

[Verse 2]
Same old song, just a drop of water
In an endless sea
All we do crumbles to the ground
Though we refuse to see
Dust in the wind
All we are is dust in the wind

[Bridge]
Oh, ho, ho

[Instrumental Break]

[Verse 3]
Now, don’t hang on, nothing lasts forever but the earth and sky
It slips away, and all your money won’t another minute buy
Dust in the wind
All we are is dust in the wind

[Outro]
All we are is dust in the wind
Dust in the wind
Everything is dust in the wind
Everything is dust in the wind
The wind

Winter winds on heaven and earth.

The Winter Song – Angel (1978) Japan FLAC Audio 1080p Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“The Winter Song” was released in 1978 on Angel’s White Hot album. Wanted to get something up for Christmas and thought it was about time to upgrade my original video for this great song. As far a many of the oldest vids go, this one wasn’t really too bad (it was dark and low-res but there are some things in it that I still like, if interested in comparison here it is: https://youtu.be/uaPmK9ANkP8 )….but I think the flac audio from the Japan CD release sounds fantastic and it was fun playing with some new effects for the vid. I just touched the equalizer on the track, to bring a bit more of the bottom….i hope you enjoy the song and my visualization. Thanks for being around and Merry Christmas! 😉

From the video description of the 2011 vid:
I always thought this was just an incredibly beautiful song and it’s always been special to me…..one of those songs that you grew up with that is special because it’s so personal and obscure. It wasn’t playing on the radio and it seemed that no one but yourself was listening to it….at least I used to have many songs like that….maybe growing up in a small town meant there was just less a chance to be around other fans of the deep album tracks from lesser bands? This song will forever remind me of my then new 1979 Powder Blue Cutlass Supreme 2-door white top…..White Hot was one of the first cassettes I used to play in it as I cruised up and down Mainstreet! Good times!

Anyway…..White Hot is the fourth album by the rock band Angel. After the release of On Earth As It Is In Heaven, bass player Mickie Jones left and was replaced by Felix Robinson who would be the bass player until Angel’s breakup in 1981. This album contains Angel’s biggest and only Top 50 hit Ain’t Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore, which went to #44 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1978. The single would spend 8 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100.

I had begun listening to Angel in 1975 when they released their debut, self-titled album. I purchased all five of their first 5 albums on vinyl and had several on 8-track and cassette as well. They were hugely advertised in Circus and Creem magazines, and many compared them to Kiss…..some unkindly as a kinda of bubblegum Kiss. For awhile it seemed that they would break out and be huge, especially around the time of their second album (Helluva Band) and third album (On Earth As It Is In Heaven)….but then the tide seemed to turn and they seemed to not be taken very seriously..

They did do some really cool stuff though that I still enjoy after all these years……and this song will always be special, to me at least.

Hope you enjoy it!

[Lyrics]
Winter is here, and it’s cold this time of year.
There’s snow everywhere in sight,
falling on this winter night.
By candle light, we share this chilly night.
There’s frost on the window pane,
winter nights are here again.

Chorus:
There’s a feeling in the air,
Feel the spirit everywhere.
Winter winds on heaven and earth.

By the fireplace, there’s a smile on every face.
The ice begins to cling, listen to the children sing.
Looking outside, the city lights all come alive.
People running all around, they fill the
streets with a happy sound.

Chorus:
There’s a feeling in the air,
Feel the spirit everywhere.
Winter winds on heaven and earth.
Hear the Angels join the choir,
Let them take the music higher.
Through winter days on heaven and earth.
(repeat Chorus and fade)

Sometimes I feel like a……

Man In The Wilderness – Styx (1977) Audio Fidelity 24k Gold FLAC 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Man In The Wilderness” was released on Styx’s seventh studio album, The Grand Illusion, on July 7, 1977. It launched the band to stardom, spawned the hit singles “Come Sail Away” and “Fooling Yourself”, and sold over three million copies in the US (Triple Platinum). The Grand Illusion was a huge favorite back in the day, and I always favored Side Two a bit, check out my other vid from that side if you are inclined; “Castle Walls” https://youtu.be/DmmDHkaTIfw

I started both of these videos about the same time many years ago, but only finished the one. I’d been thinking about finishing this one and updating that one for quite awhile and wasn’t sure which I’d get finished first….turns out, it’s this one! 😉 😉 😉 Interested to see what I can do with an update for “Castle Walls” which was one of my very first attempts to video a song?

The video features flac audio sourced from Audio Fidelity’s
24 Karat Gold CD…definitely the best the album has sounded this side of the original vinyl.

As with much of Styx’s catalog, many of the songs have quasi-medieval/fantasy lyrics and themes. Some are allegories and commentaries on contemporary American life and the members’ experiences in an American rock band in the mid-to-late 1970s.

From Allmusic.com: Other than being their first platinum-selling album, The Grand Illusion led Styx steadfastly into the domain of AOR rock. Built on the strengths of “Come Sail Away”‘s ballad-to-rock metamorphosis, which gained them their second Top Ten hit, and on the high harmonies of newcomer Tommy Shaw throughout “Fooling Yourself,” The Grand Illusion introduced Styx to the gates of commercial stardom.

The pulverized growl of “Miss America” reveals the group’s guitar-savvy approach to six-string rock, while De Young pretentiously struts his singing prowess throughout the title track. Shaw’s induction into the band has clearly settled, and his guitar work, along with James Young’s, is full and extremely sharp where it matters most.

Even the songwriting is more effluent than Crystal Ball, which was released one year earlier, shedding their mystical song motifs for a more audience-pleasing lyric and chord counterpoise. Reaching number six on the album charts, The Grand Illusion was the first to display the gelled accomplishments of both Tommy Shaw and Dennis De Young as a tandem.

[Lyrics]
Another year has passed me by
Still I look at myself and cry
What kind of man have I become?
All of the years I’ve spent in search of myself
And I’m still in the dark
‘Cause I can’t seem to find the light alone

Sometimes I feel like a man in the wilderness
I’m a lonely soldier off to war
Sent away to die – never quite knowing why
Sometimes it makes no sense at all (makes no sense at all)

Ten thousand people look my way
But they can’t see the way that I feel
Nobody even cares to try
I spend my life and sell my soul on the road
And I’m still in the dark
‘Cause I can’t seem to find the light alone

Sometimes I feel like a man in the wilderness
I’m a lonely sailor lost at sea
Drifting with the tide
Never quite knowing why
Sometimes it makes no sense at all

(I’m alive)
Looking for love I’m a man with emotion
(And my heart’s on fire)
I’m dying of thirst in the middle of the ocean
I’m alive!

[Guitar solo]

Sometimes I feel like a man in the wilderness
I’m a lonely soldier off to war
Sent away to die – never quite knowing why
Sometimes it makes no sense

Sometimes it makes no sense
Sometimes it makes no sense at all, at all
Make no sense at all, at all, at all
Can’t find the meaning of it all
Can’t find a…

Shinto and rock and roll at the Budokan

This Is Japan – Jack Green (1980) FLAC Audio 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“This is Japan” was released on Jack Green’s debut solo album, Humanesque, in 1980. I discovered this album when I was working at the record store. I recall we only received 3 copies of the album and no one knew who the artist was. I took a chance and opened a copy ——- (As I’ve mentioned in video descriptions before, I came across so much great music in this way….open a copy of an album and buy it if it was good or use the excuse that it was for in-store play …even if we didn’t like it and never played it…it happened! LOL!) —- and I remember liking it immediately, and the girl I worked with grabbed a second copy as we listened to it for the first time. Another employee bought the 3rd copy the next day. I played the hell out of it for weeks, and we special ordered some more, but never really met the demand that could be made by simply playing the album in the store….the manager would get so pissed off that I played things that we didn’t have in stock! This album was one of my favorites from the early eighties, and I’ve listened to it frequently for the last nearly 40 (ouch!) years!…still sounds as amazing as ever.

I took the FLAC audio from the CD release and equalized them for a bit more bass. I think the audio adjustment makes the tracks sound fuller with more bottom end, better, but they are just a hair under clipping and I need to give a more critical listening on my home system.

I started videos from this record over 6 years ago, but never worked them out, I really wanted to get some out so I decided to use my favorite cheat (the equalizer video! LOL!). This is my second video for a track from the album; see the first, “I Call, No Answer” (featuring Richie Blackmore’s guitar): https://youtu.be/CQuO7zEH01Y

[Lyrics]
Outside of the Tokyo Hilton
There’s a girl walking round a shrine
Singing prayers to the rising sun

A sign of life among the traffic
A brave reminder of the past
In the middle of the screaming sound

Sayonara to the sacred Samurai
Living past, ain’t it fast
This is Japan

Coming round in the land of the emperor
See a paper dragon flying through the morning sun
There the Buddha meets the future
Shinto and rock and roll at the Budokan

Sayonara to the sacred samurai
Living past, ain’t it fast
This is Japan

In the heart of Tokyo city
When it’s dark and things are moving
To the beat of fun and hustle
To the touch of flesh and muscle
Rice wine can make you happy
It’s the kind of thing that makes you feel
Closer to home
But the light are bright
And your head is spinning
On a cold dark Tokyo street you are alone in Japan

This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan

This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan

“I Call, No Answer”

I Call, No Answer – Jack Green (1980) FLAC Audio 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“I Call, No Answer” was released on Jack Green’s debut solo album, Humanesque, in 1980. I discovered this album when I was working at the record store. I recall we only received 3 copies of the album and no one knew who the artist was. I took a chance and opened a copy ——- (As I’ve mentioned in video descriptions before, I came across so much great music in this way….open a copy of an album and buy it if it was good or use the excuse that it was for in-store play …even if we didn’t like it and never played it…it happened! LOL!) —- and I remember liking it immediately, and the girl I worked with grabbed a second copy as we listened to it for the first time. Another employee bought the 3rd copy the next day. I played the hell out of it for weeks, and we special ordered some more, but never really met the demand that could be made by simply playing the album in the store….the manager would get so pissed off that I played things that we didn’t have in stock! This album was one of my favorites from the early eighties, and I’ve listened to it frequently for the last nearly 40 (ouch!) years!…still sounds as amazing as ever.

Jack Green played with T. Rex between 1973 and 1974, then with The Pretty Things between 1974 and 1976, recording Silk Torpedo and Savage Eye. After Phil May walked out on the Pretty Things he carried on with Peter Tolson, Gordon Edwards and Skip Alan in Metropolis. He also was a member of Rainbow for three weeks in late 1978.

I bought Pretty Things’ album Cross Talk the same year as this one and only learned many years later that Jack Green played in that groups two albums previous to Cross Talk (Silk Torpedo in 1974 and Savage Eye in 1975)….this is another really great band to check out!

I took the FLAC audio from the CD release and equalized them for a bit more bass. I think the audio adjustment makes the tracks sound fuller with more bottom end, better, but they are just a hair under clipping and I need to give a more critical listening on my home system.

I started videos from this record over 6 years ago, but never worked them out, I really wanted to get some out so I decided to use my favorite cheat (the equalizer video! LOL!). I’ll probably crank out more consecutive videos from this album than I typically do, so hope you enjoy Jack Green! Wanted to start with this track because Richie Blackmore (Rainbow, Deep Purple) played typically outstanding guitar on it, but every single track on the record has great, great guitar playing.

[Lyrics]
Drive all night motor fast
Pushing gears pumping gas
Burning rubber highway too

I’ve got to make it back to you

I call no answer
What’s the matter with your telephone line
I call, no answer
It’s disconnected all the time

Indian summer get to you
Just too long to do you good
Country women very pretty
I’m gonna find a little peace in the city

I call no answer
What’s the matter with your telephone line
I call, no answer
It’s disconnected all the time

So I take a little walk
Down by the tenement block
I knock and no one’s home
So I try the telephone

Keeping up, keeping time
Watch the road watch the line
Country women very pretty
I’m gonna find a little peace in the city

Hey, I call no answer
What’s the matter with your telephone line
I call, no answer
I can’t reach you any time

I call no answer
I’ve got to reach you I’ve got to reach you
I call, no answer,
It’s disconnected, disconnected, disconnected
I keep trying no answer
I cannot reach you all night long
I try now answer
Something wrong with your telephone line
alright

I call no answer
And no answer
I call no answer
I call no answer

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“I only had to dream to create the scene”

Magic Is A Child – Nektar (1977) SHM-CD FLAC Audio 4k Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Magic Is A Child” was the title track from Nektar’s seventh album, which was released in September of 1977. I bought this album when it was released though I didn’t know anything about the band…it was another of those cases where the cover art was intriguing enough that you needed to hear what was inside! 😉 Happy to say, I wasn’t disappointed and although I went on to listen to other Nektar albums released both before and after, Magic Is A Child remained my favorite by the band. Wanted to do a second video for a song from this album before moving on. Had a whole thing with ink effects started, then decided that I could just reuse the effect template I had made for Yes’ “Wonderous Stories”….of is it looks a little familiar?! 😉 Thanks for watching!

From Allmusic.com:
Magic Is a Child was released in 1977, the debut for new Nektar guitarist Dave Nelson. Carrying on, though, from where their last set left off, Nektar’s fascination with shorter, punchier songs continued unabated, even while the keyboards continued to swell and the guitars shifted ever more toward the symphonic. Nektar’s brightening vistas were new, however, and a fatal flaw as far as their fans were concerned. They didn’t want breezy pop, and breezy pop fans didn’t want Nektar, while the band’s new label, Polydor, apparently didn’t care either way. The art department did spring for the 13-year-old Brooke Shields to appear on the front cover, but that was it in terms of promotion. Thematically, too, little about Magic Is a Child recalls Nektar’s days as prog darlings. The opening “Away from Asgard” is a fine slab of Norse storytelling, tied into the vast dark forests of northern Germany (where the band was still based), while “Midnight Light” also has a romantic Germanic tinge, as it eulogizes the village of Seeheimut. “Love to Share,” in contrast, is an unabashed Beatles tribute, riddled with affectionate borrowings and an oddly effective backward drum, while “On the Run (The Trucker)” still sounds like a slice of AOR radio filler.

[Lyrics]
At the time I was a little boy
All my senses were in bloom
The forests were adventure
There dwelt the legends of my mind

I was the keeper of the golden key
I made all the rules
I only had to dream
To create the scene

Magic is a child
Imagination is alive
Magic is imagination
A child is alive

How the trees were so high
The cheese in the sky
Were part of my imagination
I was goblins and elves
With small mushroom shelves
As brothers Grimm would tell their stories

Opening my eyes in the morning I would see
Patterns in the trees making shapes that were a face to me

In those tireless times
And those carefree lines
That we draw ourselves
But they’re never kept

 

“Searching for the times that we lose in youth”

Listen – Nektar (1977) SHM-CD FLAC 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Listen” was released on Nektar’s seventh album, Magic Is A Child, in September of 1977. I bought this album when it was released though I didn’t know anything about the artist…it was another of those where the cover art was intriguing enough that you needed to hear what was inside! 😉 Happy to say, I wasn’t disappointed and although I went on to listen to other Nektar albums released both before and after, Magic Is A Child remained my favorite by the band. There are some great tunes on this record, and I have long hoped to make vids for a couple. Here’s one. Hope you enjoy. Thanks for watching!

From Allmusic.com:
Magic Is a Child was released in 1977, the debut for new Nektar guitarist Dave Nelson. Carrying on, though, from where their last set left off, Nektar’s fascination with shorter, punchier songs continued unabated, even while the keyboards continued to swell and the guitars shifted ever more toward the symphonic. Nektar’s brightening vistas were new, however, and a fatal flaw as far as their fans were concerned. They didn’t want breezy pop, and breezy pop fans didn’t want Nektar, while the band’s new label, Polydor, apparently didn’t care either way. The art department did spring for the 13-year-old Brooke Shields to appear on the front cover, but that was it in terms of promotion. Thematically, too, little about Magic Is a Child recalls Nektar’s days as prog darlings. The opening “Away from Asgard” is a fine slab of Norse storytelling, tied into the vast dark forests of northern Germany (where the band was still based), while “Midnight Light” also has a romantic Germanic tinge, as it eulogizes the village of Seeheimut. “Love to Share,” in contrast, is an unabashed Beatles tribute, riddled with affectionate borrowings and an oddly effective backward drum, while “On the Run (The Trucker)” still sounds like a slice of AOR radio filler.

[Lyrics]
Listen
To these thoughts as they drift away
Worried times
Can turn around all the things we do
Blinded
By veils we hang to avoid the truth
Searching
For the times that we lose in youth

Listen, listen

There is no light within my eyes
As darkness comes with no surprise
Shifting shadows on the wall
As night begins to fall
Times so hard
Hurts me deep inside
But life keeps on moving
Though daybreak seems so far away

Listen, listen

Listen, can you hear me
Confusion takes me as I sing this song
Leaves me nothing to do but try again
Right or wrong, you’re gonna see a change in me

Listen, listen

Listen, listen

Long as I remember, the rain been comin’ down.

Who’ll Stop The Rain – Creedence Clearwater Revival (1970) 96KHz/24bit FLAC ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Who’ll Stop The Rain” was released on Creedence Clearwater Revival’s fifth studio album, Cosmo’s Factory, on Fantasy Records in July of 1970. I’ve been working on a couple other “rain” videos, but decided to use some quick effects for this beautiful CCR tune so I could upload it on Veterans Day 2017. Thanks to all the vets who have served our great country….and to Creedence for their songs which so wonderfully captured the spirit of the Vietnam conflict and American experience related to it.

I love CCR as much as the next guy (and who doesn’t really? there can be no possible reason for not liking this band!) and I’ve wanted to make a few vids for some of the many great songs (how to choose!?) that are my favorites….one down! 😉 This was a VERY quick effort and I didn’t take the usual amount of time and effort to scrub and clean the low-res vid sources I used (mainly the Woodstock stuff)….plus I knew I should take the time to find some Vietnam footage of soldiers in the rain to tie in, but….it’s a shorter song, and I had enough to fill it out very quickly. Maybe for a future update, I’ll make those adjustments and raise the level of the video a notch? This video does feature 96KHz/24bit FLAC audio though!

Cosmo’s Factory was released the same month as the single release of “Lookin’ Out My Back Door” with “Long as I Can See the Light” on the B side. The name of the album comes from the warehouse in Berkeley where the band rehearsed early in their career. It was dubbed “The Factory” by drummer Doug “Cosmo” Clifford, because bandleader John Fogerty made them practice there almost every day.

With the release of Cosmo’s Factory in July 1970, Creedence Clearwater Revival hit their commercial zenith. It was their fifth album in two years and became an international smash, topping the album charts in six countries. The band also toured Europe in 1970, playing the Royal Albert Hall to enthusiastic audiences, and had emerged as the most popular band in America by largely ignoring the trippy acid rock indulgences that were typical of the era. However, despite the band’s infectious blend of rockabilly, folk, and R&B, some peers and rock critics dismissed them as a singles band with no substance. In a 2012 cover story, Uncut observed, “While San Francisco longhairs across the bridge scoffed at their commercialism, Creedence henceforth made a point of releasing double A-sides. And invariably both songs would have an uncanny knack of cutting through to all sections of the population.” Singer and guitarist Fogerty, who had seemingly arrived out of nowhere, but had actually struggled with his bandmates throughout most of the 1960s as the Blue Velvets and the Golliwogs, composed the group’s songs and generally steered the band artistically, although his grip on the band – including his dubious role as manager – irritated the others, especially his older brother Tom Fogerty, who left the band by the end of 1970.

In its original review, Rolling Stone opined, “It should be obvious by now that Creedence Clearwater Revival is one great rock and roll band. Cosmo’s Factory, the group’s fifth album, is another good reason why.” AllMusic states, “On ‘Long as I Can See the Light’, the record’s final song, he again finds solace in home, anchored by a soulful, laid-back groove. It hits a comforting, elegiac note, the perfect way to draw ‘Cosmo’s Factory’ – an album made during stress and chaos, filled with raging rockers, covers, and intense jams – to a close.” An editorial review from Amazon.com calls the album “the peak of a prolific streak.”

[Lyrics]
Long as I remember,
The rain been comin’ down.
Clouds of myst’ry pourin’
Confusion on the ground.
Good men through the ages
Tryin’ to find the sun.
And I wonder,
Still I wonder
Who’ll stop the rain.

I went down Virginia,
Seekin’ shelter from the storm.
Caught up in the fable,
I watched the tower grow.
Five-year plans and new deals
Wrapped in golden chains.
And I wonder,
Still I wonder
Who’ll stop the rain.

Heard the singers playin’,
How we cheered for more?
The crowd had rushed together
Tryin’ to keep warm.
Still the rain kept pourin’,
Fallin’ on my ears.
And I wonder,
Still I wonder
Who’ll stop the rain.

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