“In a moment of love, they will die for their grace”

Don’t Kill The Whale – Yes (1978) 192KHz/24bit FLAC HD Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Don’t Kill The Whale” was released on Yes’ ninth studio album, Tormato, in September of 1978. Another great Yes tune from Tormato….this one with a message it’s sad that hasn’t gotten through to everyone who should know better by this point. “Don’t Kill The Whale was initiated by Squire who played the chorus section on an acoustic guitar. Wakeman went on to adapt a sound he configured on his Polymoog which he said could produce “weird sounds” that resembled a whale.

I wanted this video to focus on the close bond of the mother and baby whale, and their beauty since I wouldn’t want to watch a video that spoiled the beauty of both the song and the graceful, gentle giants by showing them being killed…..only at the very end of the video is there that reference.

I’ve always been completely fascinated by the Cetaceans (whales, dolphins, porpoises) so this song is extra special. We can’t really understand how intelligent these animals might be yet, but we know they are very special…definitely more intelligent and precious than the neanderthals who hunt them down to slaughter or capture.

Whales are known to have extremely complex communication abilities, and social interactions…they are mammals like us of course, not fish (since they look so much more like fish than other mammals, say a dog or a person, that it’s very easy to forget they are way more like us than a fish).

Communication is so great in cetaceans that there is a strong possibility they are able to project (yes … literally project) an “auditory image” that replicates a sonar message they may receive. The process is a bit confusing, but MSU describes it in this circumstance: “So a dolphin wishing to convey the image of a fish to another dolphin can literally send the image of a fish to the other animal. The equivalent of this in humans would be the ability to create instantaneous holographic pictures to convey images to other people.”

If they are in fact able to do this, there would have to be a natural tendency to break down stylized and abstracted images into words. Meaning, cetaceans, like people, use a series of signifiers to discern the exact objects they want to communicate about. We might say “tree” and think of a picture of a tree in our minds, but cetaceans can skip this step by simply projecting the image to other cetaceans.

Frow Wiki:
It is their last album recorded with singer Jon Anderson and keyboardist Rick Wakeman prior to their departure from the group in 1980. After wrapping their tour in support of their previous album, Going for the One (1977), the band gathered in London in February 1978 to record a new album. The band encountered several issues that hindered its potential including their overall direction, the decision to produce it by themselves, and its uneven quality.

Tormato received a mixed critical reception upon release, but was a commercial success. It peaked at No. 8 in the UK and No. 10 in the US. “Don’t Kill the Whale” was released as a single in the UK which reached No. 36. Tormato continued to sell in the US and is certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America for selling over one million copies. Yes supported the album with the commercially successful 1978–79 tour with concerts performed in the round. Tormato was remastered for CD in 1994 and 2004; the latter contains several previously unreleased tracks from the album’s recording sessions.

As with Going for the One, the album’s cover was designed by Hipgnosis but retains the band’s logo designed by Roger Dean. Howe pitched the album’s original title of Yes Tor, referring to Yes Tor, the second highest hill on Dartmoor, an area of moorland in Devon, England. Wakeman claimed to have thrown a tomato at the pictures taken for the album as he recalled the band were disappointed with the initial artwork which had cost a lot of money. The album’s title and cover was changed accordingly. Wakeman said the album became a “tragedy” as it had poor artwork and production, but good music. Howe said it was someone at Hipgnosis who threw the tomato on purpose, something that he felt insulted about.

[Lyrics]
You’re first I’m last
You’re thirst I’m asked to justify
Killing our last heaven beast
Don’t hunt the whale

In beauty vision do we offer much
If we reason with destiny
Gonna lose our touch
Don’t kill the whale

Rejoice they sing
They worship their own space
In a moment of love, they will die for their grace
Don’t kill the whale

If time will allow
We will judge all who came
In the wake of our new age to stand for the frail
Don’t kill the whale

 

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You say tomato, I say Tormato

Madrigal – Yes (1978) 192KHz/24bit FLAC 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Madrigal” was released on Yes’ ninth studio album, Tormato, in September of 1978. This is a beautiful tune from the album that features Rick Wakeman playing a Thomas Goff harpsichord. Hoping to get a couple more videos I’ve started for other tracks from Tormato finished soon. This one features a few clips (I’ve enhanced HDR levels for more vibrancy) from Lech Majewski’s wonderfully gorgeous and unusual 2011 film, The Mill and The Cross which is a movie surrounding and set-inside the painting The Way to Calvary (1564) by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. I absolutely love the imagery this film creates, check it out if you’ve not seen it.

Frow Wiki:
It is their last album recorded with singer Jon Anderson and keyboardist Rick Wakeman prior to their departure from the group in 1980. After wrapping their tour in support of their previous album, Going for the One (1977), the band gathered in London in February 1978 to record a new album. The band encountered several issues that hindered its potential including their overall direction, the decision to produce it by themselves, and its uneven quality.

Tormato received a mixed critical reception upon release, but was a commercial success. It peaked at No. 8 in the UK and No. 10 in the US. “Don’t Kill the Whale” was released as a single in the UK which reached No. 36. Tormato continued to sell in the US and is certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America for selling over one million copies. Yes supported the album with the commercially successful 1978–79 tour with concerts performed in the round. Tormato was remastered for CD in 1994 and 2004; the latter contains several previously unreleased tracks from the album’s recording sessions.

As with Going for the One, the album’s cover was designed by Hipgnosis but retains the band’s logo designed by Roger Dean. Howe pitched the album’s original title of Yes Tor, referring to Yes Tor, the second highest hill on Dartmoor, an area of moorland in Devon, England. Wakeman claimed to have thrown a tomato at the pictures taken for the album as he recalled the band were disappointed with the initial artwork which had cost a lot of money. The album’s title and cover was changed accordingly. Wakeman said the album became a “tragedy” as it had poor artwork and production, but good music. Howe said it was someone at Hipgnosis who threw the tomato on purpose, something that he felt insulted about. According to White, the band “couldn’t decide on the cover. I think Po … put a picture of a guy with divining sticks on the front. He took it home one night and decided it wasn’t working. So he threw a tomato at it”.

The sleeve includes a photograph of the band that was taken in Regent’s Park, London, with each member wearing a bomber jacket and sunglasses and looking in a different direction. Each jacket was labelled with the member’s name on the front, but Squire had forgotten his and had to wear one labelled “Jim”, belonging to tour manager Jim Halley. The word “Chris” was then drawn onto the final cover.

[Lyrics]
I will be there said my friend of a distant life
Covered in greens of a golden age, set in stone
Follow me “he sounded of dreams supreme” follow me
Drifting within the glow and the after-glow of the eve

And if that firelight, I could match the inner flame

Sacred ships do sail the seventh age

Cast off your garments of fear, replace them with love
Most of all play with the game of the age
Highest of places remain all as one with you
Giving us light and the freedom of the day

And if that firelight, I could match the inner flame

Sacred ships do sail the seventh age
And have always been here

Celestial travelers have always been here with us
Set in the homes of the Universe we have yet to go
Countless expansions will arrive and flow inside of us
My friend, he of fantasy, dancing with the spirit of the age

To hear your wonderous stories.

Wonderous Stories – Yes (1977) 192Khz/24bit FLAC ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Wonderous Stories” was released on Yes’ eight studio album, Going for the One, on 15 July 1977. This is my second video for a track from the Going For The One album (I did the title track way way back; check it if you dare; https://youtu.be/ZR1koTw5NqI ), and one of numerous Yes videos I’ve made. I haven’t uploaded any new Yes videos in a long time because all the ones I’ve made just seem to get buried and get very few views….I’ll try again, if there’s any interest I might update the ancient “Going For The One” and finish and upload more great tracks from Going For The One and other Yes albums? If you’re a Yes fan, please drop a like and a comment, maybe give it a share….it all helps. Thanks!

Since this is an album that I will ramble on about, I’ll just paste some of my notes on the album copied from the description of my old video for “Going For The One”:

“Going For The One” is the title track from Yes’s eighth studio album which was released in the summer of 1977. This is such a special record for me and I recall so clearly and strongly the circumstances of it’s release. I was a sophomore in high school and although I was well into my journey of seeking to listen to all the rock bands of the time, Yes was one of those bands that I knew really only by their singles. There was an extreme amount of anticipation, advertising, and awareness surrounding the pending new album from Yes.

A couple of weeks after buying the LP, I was flying out to Los Angeles with my family to spend six weeks with my dad who was working in the motion picture industry….I remember begging my mom to stop at a record store near the airport so I could pick up a few 8-tracks to play on my new (then KILLER! 😉 portable player for the flight and afterwards….I purchased Going For The One, Animals, Low, I Robot, Trans-Europe Express and Little Queen (the first three I already had on LP, but I wasn’t about to spend the rest of the summer without them!). I still associate some of these records with that summer in LA, especially Going For The One.

From Wiki:
“Wonderous Stories” is the second track on the album solely written by Anderson. He wrote the song during “a beautiful day” while living in Switzerland, “one of those days you want to remember for years afterwards”. During the day, the lyrics to the track entered his mind that he later wrote down. He noted the song’s meaning as “the joys of life, as opposed to the uptightedness of some aspects of life” that was inspired by romantic stories and “a kind of dream sequence”. White contributed the idea of the drums and bass playing on odd beats.[

The album was recorded in Montreux, Switzerland after the band took a break in activity for each member to release a solo album and their 1976 North American tour. It marks the departure of keyboardist Patrick Moraz and the return of Rick Wakeman, who had left to pursue his solo career after musical differences surrounding Tales from Topographic Oceans (1973). In a departure from their previous three albums, Going for the One features shorter and more direct songs written without a unifying theme or concept, and saw Yes record with new producers, engineers and cover designers.

Going for the One received a mostly positive response from music critics who welcomed the band’s return to more accessible music like their earlier albums The Yes Album (1971) and Fragile (1971). It was a commercial success and reached number one on the UK Albums Chart, their second album to do so, for two weeks and peaked at number 8 on the US Billboard 200. “Wonderous Stories” and “Going for the One” were released as singles; the former went to number 7 in the UK which remains the band’s highest charting single. Going for the One was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for 500,000 copies sold in the US. Yes supported the album with a six-month tour of North America and Europe.

[Lyrics]
I awoke this morning
Love laid me down by a river.
Drifting I turned on upstream
Bound for my forgiver.
In the giving of my eyes to see your face.
Sound did silence me
Leaving no trace.
I beg to leave, to hear your wonderous stories.
Beg to hear your wonderous stories.

He spoke of lands not far
Or lands they were in his mind.
Of fusion captured high
Where reason captured his time.
In no time at all he took me to the gate.
In haste I quickly checked the time.
If I was late I had to leave to hear your wonderous stories.
Had to hear your wonderous stories.

Hearing
Hearing
Hearing your wonderous stories.
Hearing your wonderous stories.
It is no lie I can see deeply into the future.
Imagine everything
You’re close
And were you there to stand
So cautiously at first and then so high.
As he spoke my spirit climbed into the sky.
I bid it to return
To hear your wonderous stories.
Return to hear your wonderous stories.

Hearing,
Hearing,
Hearing,
Hearing,
Hearing,

Something – Booker T. & the M.G.s (1970)

Something – Booker T. & the M.G.s (1970) 192KHz/24bit FLAC HD Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Something” was the second track on McLemore Avenue, the 9th studio album by Booker T. & the M.G.s, which was released in April of 1970. The record consisted entirely of mostly instrumental covers of songs from the Beatles’ album Abbey Road (released only months earlier, in September 1969). The title and cover are an homage to the Beatles album, 926 East McLemore Avenue being the address of the Stax Studios in Memphis, as Abbey Road was for EMI Studios in London.

Booker T. Jones said, “I was in California when I heard Abbey Road, and I thought it was incredibly courageous of The Beatles to drop their format and move out musically like they did. To push the limit like that and reinvent themselves when they had no need to do that. They were the top band in the world but they still reinvented themselves. The music was just incredible so I felt I needed to pay tribute to it.”

This record has always been really special to me. There are so few good reasons to listen to cover work of The Beatles, some great stuff scattered about but mostly pointless. This record has always astonished me with this band’s groovyfanfukncydelic interpretations….the songs just breath and there is so much amazing musicianship in every second of the record. This is the band we all wish we could have had. I really can’t pick a favorite musician from this band they are all stellar, but drummer Al Jackson, Jr and Booker T. Jones and his magical Hammond M3 Organ were insane brilliant, and guitarist Steve Cropper and bassist Donald “Duck” Dunn were merely among the greatest who ever played. Damn, they were really something.

I’ve wanted to do somethings from McLemore Avenue for so long, but never could figure how to go about it. Finally found the fat, equalizer trick to work the video around. I’ll probably do the entire album, because it’s one of those records where, if I ever start to listen to, I cannot stop until the end!

If your a fan of rock n roll, The Beatles, Stax, soul, funk, soul or really music in general, McLemore Avenue is one that you really should give a listen to. It requires good headphones or a good home rig to get the full effect of the music, the bottom end, etc…plus it should be played LOUD if it’s gonna be played at all! 😉

Thanks again to all my friends who stick around and encourage me to plug on! You guys RoCk! 😉

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