“And we talked about the strength of dreams”

“Song of Seven” was the title track from Jon Anderson’s 2nd solo album, released in November 1980 on Atlantic Records.

This album was was very special for me back in my college days. I used to play it very frequently in-store at Record Town back when it was released in 1980. This song in particular is has always been a favorite for me. As a huge Yes fan, I still think the song as a whole stands with some of their best work…..and I’d go even further by stating the section beginning at 3:50 stands equal to anything the band ever did…it’s extraordinarily beautiful. I used to play this section over and over and I still think it’s one of the most gorgeous pieces of music I’ve ever heard.

I came across a short video maybe a year ago from 2004 called “Demon” from director Irina Evteeva and knew immediately I’d want to use it in a video. But first the video resolution was pretty poor and wouldn’t look too good even in it’s original resolution (not to mention trying to spread it out to 1080p)….and second, exactly which song should I use it in? I worked out the first by processing the video through After Effects with various tools and effects. I was very surprised that I was actually able to achieve such great results….I think it was the style of the original video that allowed me to improve it so much, but it definitely looks great now! (Seems a waste not to use the effort to show the film in it’s full edit…there is no dialog and the soundtrack is basically some piano and classical arrangements….not nearly as impressive as the video. I may end up sharing it later.) Choosing which song to edit it to took me even more time; I wanted to use it on a big popular tune as it had such a stylish and special look and I wanted it to be seen. I tried it to several epic songs (one in particular it worked pretty well with, I’ll maybe drop that edit later)….I kept coming back to “Song of Seven” because i liked how it worked….knowing that such an obscure tune wouldn’t get the views, but who knows, maybe the video edit will give both the song and the film more exposure and appreciation? Enjoy. Thanks!

Song of Seven was released during Anderson’s first hiatus from Yes and supported by his first solo tour. “Some Are Born”, “Days”, “Everybody Loves You” and “Hear It” were originally written and demoed during the Tormato sessions. The “Some Are Born” and “Days” demo versions from these sessions were included as bonus tracks on the 2004 CD reissue of Tormato.

Another track from the Song of Seven Album:
“Days” https://youtu.be/qSQHTFxY7Eo

[Lyrics]
In the meeting place I sit beside, betwixt the points of heaven
I befell a friendly atmosphere revolving around seven
Oh, that number mystified my soul and captured within feelings
Those of doubt and understanding, hand in hand they set me reeling

Met me a stranger, he came here to town
Bearing gifts full of promises, discoveries of light
Said me many reasons why my merry tale
Could be justified and just both together entwined

I tell you a reason, he said, “Bless you, you fool, you fool”
You want “so belief,” yet you want so much more,” you seeker
Now I see you’re baffled, yet again you administer fear
Of the unexpected, you don’t know the score

Everywhere you look you release parts of your senses
And everywhere there’s purpose in answer to all your dreams
I can hear you saying what a dreamer, what a fool to life
Isn’t it a pity that he won’t come back to earth

Haven’t you imagination, and is it not available
How you can be sooner or later than your thinking
Haven’t you imagination and is it so impossible
That you ask of everything so your eyes can see clearly

So in an instant your story bound
A desert, the underground, on mountains high
A glacier, the heat of the day

City jungle, the sky at night
In space on a starry night
An atmosphere impossible
So you never really care

So we talk about the strength of dreams
And we talked at length of every dream
And we talked about the strength of dreams
And we talked about the strength of dreaming

In the meeting place I sit beside, betwixt the points of heaven
I befell a friendly atmosphere revolving around seven
Oh, that number mystified my soul and captured within feelings
Those of doubt and understanding, hand to hand they set me reeling

In the seventh dream to stand alone
But not without the strength of love
To guide our way, everyday

Oh, the seventh dream, your smile can bring
Love on and on and time will flow forever clear
The seventh dream standing so near
And very soon we’ll walk with love
Love that I can sing to you, you, you

Is it this time of day that makes me realise
The sun is coming out to shine again tomorrow, tomorrow
Is it this time of day that gives you hope

Is it this time of times that comes between the light
Are there so many dreamers in this life between a moment’s time
And the stairways of love, the starlight, the starlight
Telling me that there’s something else to cling on to, cling on to

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Conquistador a vulture sits, upon your silver sheath

Conquistador – Procol Harum (1967) *Stereo Version FLAC Remaster HD Video

Conquistador” was released in September 1967 on Procol Harum’s self-titled debut studio album.

Though the album was recorded on multitrack, it was issued as mono-only in the UK, and in mono and rechannelled stereo in the US. Despite extensive searching, the original multitrack tapes have not been located and thus a stereo mix of the original ten tracks may never be possible. Several alternate takes, however, have been mixed into stereo and are available on CD.

This is the stereo version of the song from Cherry Red’s excellent (and not heavily compressed!) 2CD. I love how the organ sounds on the stereo mix version….much more aggressive. I had the original video looking pretty clean, but then lost it a bit when I added all the effects….have to lose a bit of definition for the effects, but I like experimenting and making the videos look different….still refining my technique. 😉

I have been listening to a lot of Procol Harum lately….nearly exclusively Procol Harum, up and down the catalog for maybe three weeks! This was always a band I loved, but I hadn’t really ever done such a comprehensive and focused listen to their entire catalog. I knew the individual periods, but never really put it all together. I was so surprised to find so many great things that I’d forgotten (or never really knew). After this long period of re-evaluation Procol Harum has definitely clicked up several notches on my list of favorite progressive bands….from maybe just out of the top ten into the Top Five! 🙂 🙂 If you like PH and enjoy my videos, stay tuned! If you’re not a huge PH fan already, then I suggest you give their catalog a fresh listen (or three…..so much of their stuff really benefits from repeated listening to really open it up)….they have released a dozen albums in the past 50 years, from their first astonishing album in 1967 through last year’s seriously excellent album, Novum. I’m happy I’m deep into this band now and regret that I didn’t undertake a reevaluation of their work earlier.

All songs were originally credited written to Gary Brooker (music) and Keith Reid (lyrics), except “Repent Walpurgis” written by Matthew Fisher, after works by French organist Charles-Marie Widor and German composer Johann Sebastian Bach.

Procol Harum’s lyricist Keith Reid stated “Conquistador” was written before the lyrics. He added that this was unusual as “99 out of 100” of the Procol Harum songs, back then, “were written the words first, and then were set to music.”

The original North American release included a poster of the album cover.

The album has been repackaged and reissued many times. Two of the significant reissues are Procol Harum…Plus!, a 1998 CD compilation on the Westside label including all the songs from both the Deram and Regal Zonophone release, plus “Homburg” (the group’s second single) and nine additional tracks from the period; and a monaural audiophile vinyl LP edition released in 2003 by Classic Records, with yet a different track order, including “Homburg” as the opening track and without “A Whiter Shade of Pale” or “Good Captain Clack”. The set includes bonus singles of the original monaural and alternate stereo versions of “A Whiter Shade of Pale”. A 2009 remaster by Salvo Records, using the original mono masters, was released, with bonus tracks including the singles “A Whiter Shade of Pale”, “Homburg”, B-sides and alternate stereo takes. However, many of the tracks are played at a higher speed. A 2015 remaster by Cherry Red Records expands the album into a 2-CD set.

A live version of the track “Conquistador”, from the album Procol Harum Live with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, was released as a single in 1972 and charted to #16 in the US on the Billboard Hot 100 after 10 weeks on the chart.

[Lyrics]
Conquistador your stallion stands in need of company
And like some angel’s haloed brow
You reek of purity
I see your armor plated breast
Has long since lost its sheen
And in your death masked face
There are no signs which can be seen
And though I hoped for something to find
I could see no maze to unwind
Conquistador a vulture sits, upon your silver sheath
And in your rusty scabbard now, the sand has taken seed
And though your jewel-encrusted blade
Has not been plundered still
The sea has washed across your face
And taken of its fill
And though I hoped for something to find
I could see no maze to unwind
And though I hoped for something to find
I could see no maze to unwind
Conquistador there is no time, I must pay my respect
And though I came to jeer at you
I leave now with regret
And as the gloom begins to fall
I see there is no, only all
And though you came with sword held high
You did not conquer, only die
And though I hoped for something to find
I could see no maze to unwind
And though I hoped for something to find
I could see no maze to unwind
And though I hoped for something to find
I could see no maze to unwind

In days gone by there was a queen

A Fool For Love – Bryan Ferry (2002) 96 KHz/24 bit FLAC 4K Video

“A Fool For Love” was released on Bryan Ferry’s eleventh studio album Frantic, on Virgin Records in April 2002. The majority of tracks were produced by the team of Rhett Davies, Colin Good, and Bryan Ferry; David A. Stewart and Robin Trower also co-produced several tracks.

This is an update for another of my really ancient original videos. The plan was for a quick n easy update for a video that wasn’t too awful (as the early ones go) to begin with, mainly as an excuse to use a really great 96 KHz/24 bit FLAC from a vinyl needle drop….the most gloriously sounding version of this glorious track that I could find (I also have the album on the hard to find DVD-Audio) but this one sourced from vinyl really does bring the warmth and depth of the vinyl recording.

As with my updates, the goal was to try and update the original image, video and audio elements with higher quality/higher resolution files….and as usual, I ended up going a bit overboard on the thing. Definitely this is an epic tune that deserves an epic video….maybe just not quite THIS epic? LOL! All I really need is a good editor to help me dial it down, because while my brain is telling me “less is more” my heart is saying “forget that,….MORE IS MORE!” 😉 😉 Whatevs…if you know the tune I hope you enjoy the presentation…..and if you don’t know the tune, I hope the presentation opens it up and helps it become one of your new favorites! Thanks to my old friends for sticking around with me….and thanks to any newbies that might find and watch the vid.

Reviewing for AllMusic critic, Tim DiGravina wrote of the album “Some listeners might suggest that an album this varied has an identity crisis, but with [these] standout tracks as glorious as the Dylan covers and the Eno closer, Frantic is a fascinating addition to Bryan Ferry’s accomplished discography.” And reviewing for PopMatters critic, David Medsker wrote of the album “Frantic may play like a greatest hits album, with bits here recalling Boys and Girls and songs there echoing late Roxy, and it may rank in the middle to upper of the pack of his overall body of work. But it’s the most cohesive album he’s done in ages. Given how down and out he appeared to be, the fact that Frantic is more than half good is cause for joy.”

Frantic manages to touch upon virtually every musical style of Bryan Ferry’s career. Ferry has proved to be as interested in covering other artists’ material as penning original songs, and he straddles a smart mix of originals and covers here. Two brilliant Bob Dylan songs appear among the opening tracks: “It’s All Over Now Baby Blue” sees a return to the eclectic, energetic experimentation of Ferry’s early albums with Roxy Music as a lush modern swirl of instruments mingles with the singer’s stylized vocals and throwback harmonica; “Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright” completes the Dylan pair, as Ferry intones with confidence and again takes up harmonica over Colin Good’s rolling piano. The reverent Leadbelly cover “Goodnight Irene” reimagines Ferry as a kind of blues troubadour. “One Way Love” sees the Drifters’ song reworked as a squall of distorted guitars and keyboards. Almost half of Frantic’s songs originated from late-’90s sessions with Eurythmics’ Dave Stewart, and Stewart is given a co-writer credit for these songs. Though the Stewart songs tend to favor edginess over songwriting, a few of them manage to break through the bombast. “Goddess of Love” is probably the best song about Marilyn Monroe since Kitchens of Distinction’s “When in Heaven,” and there’s a passing musical resemblance to that great song. “Hiroshima” works like an ominous take on Roxy Music’s synth-heavy Avalon period, with raging guitar dynamics contributed by Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood. Roxy Music fans will find more reasons to rejoice with the superb album closer, “I Thought,” which was co-written with Brian Eno, who sings backing vocals and plays keyboards. Some listeners might suggest that an album this varied has an identity crisis, but with standout tracks as glorious as the Dylan covers and the Eno closer, Frantic is a fascinating addition to Bryan Ferry’s accomplished discography.

[Lyrics]
In days gone by
There was a king
A fool for love
And all it brings

So high and wise
Could read your mind
A fool for love
And love is blind

A crowded street
An empty train
A fool for love
You cry in vain

A fool for love
A fool for love
A fool for love

In days gone by
There was a queen
A fool for love
And all it means

Red ruby lips
Don’t touch me eyes
A fool for love
And love is blind

A fool for love
A fool for love
A fool for love

Like flowers in the rain
I’m twisted up inside
I’ll never be the same

I hear the same old lines
You played me for a fool
You really hurt my pride

A fool for love
A fool for love
A fool for love

In days gone by
There was a king
A fool for love
And all it brings

So high and wise
Could read your mind
A fool for love
And love is blind

As life goes drifting by Like a breeze she’ll gently sigh

For My Lady – The Moody Blues (1972) 192khz/24bit FLAC 4K Video

“For My Lady” was the third track on the 1st side of The Moody Blues’ eighth studio album, Seventh Sojourn, which was released in October 1972. This is one of my favorite tracks from the fantastic Seventh Sojourn album.

This video was one of those start and finish in one setting efforts. Although I had a video version started years ago, so long ago that I couldn’t remember what was going on it , so I just grabbed a few of the first images and video clips that I thought might fit….some of the choices would be easy to marginally improve, but I was determined to make what I had work. I hope you enjoy the deelio! Thanks for checking it out!

The opening track, Mike Pinder’s “Lost in a Lost World” laments the brutality of revolution and references racial tension. Several songs contain overt political references. “You and Me,” like “Question” from two years earlier, alludes to ongoing wars and conflicts, including Vietnam. However, although the album showcases political concerns, in the 1990 documentary The Moody Blues: Legend of a Band, bassist John Lodge described “I’m Just a Singer (In a Rock and Roll Band)” as a response to fans who mistakenly read guru-like wisdom into the Moodies’ lyrics. Instrumentally, singer/keyboardist Mike Pinder, in addition to the Mellotron, used a similar keyboard device called the Chamberlin.

eventh Sojourn reached #5 in the United Kingdom, and became the band’s first American chart topper, spending five weeks at #1 to close out 1972.

Two hit singles came from this album: “Isn’t Life Strange” (#13 UK, #29 US) and “I’m Just a Singer (In a Rock and Roll Band)” (#36 UK, #12 US). However, both songs were overshadowed by the re-release of “Nights in White Satin,” which had been first released in 1967. Whereas both singles from Seventh Sojourn made the top 40, “Nights In White Satin” bested both, hitting #9 in the UK and #2 in the United States and gaining the highest American chart position for a Moody Blues single.

As this album proved difficult to record, with a 1973 follow-up quickly shelved after inception, the group decided to go on hiatus after their tour of Asia in 1974 (Mike Pinder’s last tour with the group), before reuniting in 1977 for Octave (1978) and its subsequent tour, albeit without Pinder.

In April 2007 the album was remastered into SACD format and repackaged with four extra tracks. “Island”, the fourth bonus track, was recorded in 1973 and is an incomplete recording of one of the songs that were intended to be released on the aforementioned follow-up record.

In 2008 a remaster for standard audio CD was issued with the same bonus tracks.

[Lyrics]
My boat sails stormy seas
Battles oceans filled with tears
At last my port’s in view
Now that I’ve discovered you
Oh I’d give my life so lightly
For my gentle lady
Give it freely and completely
To my lady
As life goes drifting by
Like a breeze she’ll gently sigh
And slowly bow her head
Then you’ll hear her softly cry.
Oh I’d give my life so lightly
For my gentle lady
Give it freely and completely
To my lady
Words that you say when we’re alone
Though actions speak louder than words
But all I can say is I love you so
To drive away all my hurt
Oh I’d give my life so lightly
For my gentle lady
Give it freely and completely
To my lady
Set sail before the sun
Feel the warmth that’s just begun
Share each and every dream
They belong to everyone.
Oh I’d give my life so lightly
For my gentle lady
Give it freely and completely
To my lady