Soon these days shall pass away

Cheyenne Anthem – Kansas (1976) FLAC HD Video

“Cheyenne Anthem” was a track on Kansas’ fourth studio album, Leftoverture, which was released just before Halloween 1976. This was the band’s first album to be certified by the RIAA, and remains their highest selling album, having been certified 4 times platinum in the United States.

I’ve always loved this song, especially the majestic final instrumental section (starting at 5:48 just after the lyric “In the ground our bodies lay, here we’ll stay”……I think it’s the piano playing that hits the hardest. Beautiful work.

I’ve been pretty inactive with my video uploads lately due to the hard drive failure that I’d mentioned in the previous video description. “Cheyenne Anthem” was the video I was working on when everything went south. Bad news was that I had to pick up with an older version of this work , and had to recreate some sequences that I’d already finished…..even before the crash this was an epic, tricky one to make (the time changes! the tone changes!), and I really couldn’t get into trying to recreate what I’d lost. As finished, the video is all over the map and I think I’ll try and tie the styles together better at some point with an update in the future, but for now it’s either upload the damn thing or put it on a shelf for a long, long break! 😉 The good news is I was able to recover almost all of the almost 3 years of work files that I’d not backed up! YIKES! I don’t think I would have been uploading many videos after losing all that work, so many updates and new videos I thought were gone forever….now I’m excited that hundreds of my works in progress will survive to see the light of day after all! We live to rock another day, rockers!!! 😉 Thanks to you all for being here with me and I hope you enjoy this one.

Steve Walsh began to experience writer’s block prior to the recording, and his contribution to the album would ultimately be limited to co-authoring three songs. It fell on Kerry Livgren to fill the void. The new compositions retained much of the classically inspired complexity of Livgren’s previous work. Kansas recorded the album at Studio in the Country in Bogalusa, Louisiana. The Studio in the Country was so named because, as Livgren described on In the Studio with Redbeard radio show in the episode spotlighting Leftoverture, “it was in the middle of a swamp. We’d walk out of the studio and there would be gators in front of the studio, mosquitos the size of B-52s and at times armadillos would run into the control room, laughing.”

Leftoverture opens with the song “Carry On Wayward Son”, which Livgren wrote as a sequel to “The Pinnacle”, the final song from the previous album Masque (1975).

The album’s title, Leftoverture, is a portmanteau word.

The album was met with mixed reviews. Rolling Stone called Leftoverture Kansas’s best album to date, and said that it “warrants Kansas a spot right alongside Boston and Styx as one of the fresh new American bands who combine hard-driving group instrumentation (with a dearth of flashy solos) with short, tight melody lines and pleasant singing.” The magazine Playboy reviewed the album as “extremely strong” and lauded Kansas for representing “the solid, Midwestern values of our vast musical heartland.” In contrast, Robert Christgau said the album lacked the intelligence and conviction of European progressive rock, and that the self-deprecating humor implied in the song and album titles is completely absent from the record itself.

Modern reviews are likewise mixed. Gary Graff found Leftoverture “Kansas’ breakthrough album and a thorough representation of its assorted musical sensibilities.” The AllMusic reviewer instead wrote that the album contains “neither hooks nor true grandiosity to make it interesting” and, despite the great single “Carry On Wayward Son”, the fact that Kansas “never manage to rival it anywhere on this record is as much a testament to their crippling ambition as their lack of skills.”

[Lyrics]
[Robby Steinhardt:]
From the mountains to the sun, Life has only just begun
We wed this land and pledge our souls to meet its end
Life has only just begun
Here my people roam the earth, in the kingdom of our birth
Where the dust of all our horses hides the sun
We are mighty on the earth, on the earth

[Steve Walsh:]
You have come to move me, take me from my ancient home
Land of my fathers I can’t leave you now
We will share it with you, no man owns this earth we’re on

Now the wheels are rolling hear the howling winds of war
It’s my destiny to fight and die
But is there no solution, can we find no other way, Lord let me stay
Under the endless sky and the earth below
Here I was born to live and I will never go, oh no

[Choir:]
But we cannot endure like the earth and the mountains
Life is not ours to keep, for a new sun is rising

[Robby Steinhardt:]
Soon these days shall pass away, for our freedom we must pay
All our words and deeds are carried on the wind
In the ground our bodies lay, here we’ll stay

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Lights of Taormina – Mark Knopfler (2015)

Lights of Taormina – Mark Knopfler (2015) 192kHz/24bit HD FLAC Audio

“Lights of Taormina” was released in March 2015 on Mark Knopfler’s eighth solo album, Tracker. Mark is such an amazing songwriter and guitarist and I’m happy to support his continued solo work which never fails to satisfy. Lots of solo stuff that I’d love to video. Recently uploaded vids for a couple of tracks from his latest album, decided to make this my third video for a tune from his last album. Hope you enjoy and thank for watching!

“Lights of Taormina” reflects Mark Knopfler’s knack for writing on the road and turning his experiences there into music. “Over the years I’ve learned to write on the go,” he told Billboard magazine.

Knopfler added that he started writing this song, “where I was actually sitting on this beautiful terrace, looking down at Taormina.”
The popular tourist destination of Taormina is a small town on the east coast of the island of Sicily, Italy. Knopfler played at Taormina’s ancient Greek theater on July 16, 2013.

Some believe that Knopfler was looking down on Taormina from Hotel Villa Angela, which is owned by Jim Kerr, the lead singer of Simple Minds. Kerr fell in love with the island of Sicily when he visited on tour, and later set up the hotel, which is set on a hillside above Taormina.

From Wiki:
According to the review aggregator website Metacritic, Tracker received generally favorable reviews, achieving a critical score of 70 based on 15 critic reviews. In his review for AllMusic, Stephen Thomas Erlewine gave the album three and a half out of five stars, noting that the album is “scaled smaller” than his previous double-album effort Privateering, “easing its way into being instead of announcing itself with a thunder”.Knopfler isn’t pining for the past but he is looking back, sometimes wistfully, sometimes with a resigned smile, and he appropriately draws upon sounds that he’s long loved.

In his review for American Songwriter, Hal Horowitz gave the album four out of five stars, observing:

Touches of Celtic, jazz, country and folk, but seldom rock, inform these lovely tunes that take their time as if on a leisurely stroll … He’s in no hurry telling these colorful stories that unspool slowly and deliberately. Like much of Van Morrison’s best work, the relaxed pace provides the consistent thread that makes this a cohesive album instead of a batch of songs. The softly dignified pace, immaculately constructed lyrics and especially the immediately identifiable slithering guitar lines” all work to create “timeless songs that feel organic, measured and are clearly heartfelt as Knopfler crafts music that will sound as magnificent in 50 years as it does today.”

In his review for Rolling Stone, Will Hermes gave the album three and a half out of five stars, calling it “modest” and “multifaceted”. Hermes noted, “Knopfler’s quicksilver guitar is understated, and he delivers stories of stoic ache like an old watchmaker on a pub stool—quietly riveting.”

In his review for The Telegraph, Neil McCormick gave the album three out of five stars, acknowledging the work’s “understated refinement”, but noting it “lacks the epic scope of Dire Straits”. According to McCormick, there is a predictability to the album that undermines its effectiveness, noting, “Fans will find much to enjoy here, but it might be time for Knopfler to push himself out of his comfort zone.”

[Lyrics]
There’s laughter in the darkness
Music floating in across the bay
He’s half listening and wondering
How he could have let her slip away
So long ago but still he wants to know
If anyone has seen her
And he’s sitting out in the night
Looking down upon the lights of Taormina

They were young and love was shining
Like the colours of the rainbow
Desire felt like choking
Love was smoking under the volcano
He can still taste her kisses
Sweet as the red wine from Messina
Now he’s sitting out in the night
Looking down upon the lights of Taormina

Seems like another lifetime
When they rambled along the shore
Seems like another lifetime
She used to call him her sweet senor
Maybe in another lifetime
On a pathway to the sea
Maybe there they’ll be

The crowd calls for the emperor
Raise their hands to hail another king
But he’s been so long a wanderer
Another crowd can never mean a thing
He came, he saw, he conquered
Ten thousand voices roared in the arena
Now he’s sitting out in the night
Looking down upon the lights of Taormina

He hears the chimes of history
Myths of gods and men forever ringing
Ancient dreams in all their mystery
Wars for Sicily and Spartan women
In the mists of antiquity
Ships of war set sail from Carthagina
Now he’s sitting out in the night
Looking down upon the lights of Taormina
Sitting out in the night
Looking down upon the lights of Taormina

Hello, baby hello

Harmony – Elton John (1973) Blu-ray High Fidelity Pure Audio FLAC HD 1080p

“Harmony” was released in October 1973 on Elton John’s seventh studio album, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road. Every song on this album is an example of perfectly constructed pop/rock ….amazing EJ vocals, brilliant Bernie songwriting, a crack band at the top of it’s form, and glorious production.

Many years ago, I set out to make a video for every song from this album….I made several, and then petered out. Recently I had decided to dust-off a couple I’d started and finish them, and to update the old ones, and then maybe stay on track and finish the album. That was the plan. I had a video for “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” scheduled to be my next upload….however when I tried to access the files one night to finish the video, I realized that I wouldn’t be skipping down the yellow brick road for awhile because the files were all inaccessible because the drive was unreadable due to a critical drive failure.

This hard-drive crash for was for my primary work drive loaded with videos that were in various stages of completion….bummed to think I lost countless hours of effort and numerous nearly complete productions….so many effects that I’d worked up that, most of which I’ll never take the time to re-create. That drive is out for recovery, but much of the data will be lost. I thought seriously about letting my last upload be my last, and roll up the MetalGuruMessiah carpet. Decided to wait on the results from the data recovery to see what’s next….in the meantime, I rebuilt one of the easier efforts that was on the lost drive…a drag to spend time on something I’d already spent time on!? 😦 I’m not very good a backing up data, but usually get around to it….how in the world did I go 3 years without a backup of my primary production drive? Fingers crossed on the recovery.

The album sold over 12 million copies worldwide, and is regarded as one of John’s best. It was recorded at the Château d’Hérouville in France after problems recording at the intended location of Jamaica. Among the 17 tracks, the album contains the hits “Candle in the Wind”, “Bennie and the Jets”, “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” and “Saturday Night’s Alright for Fighting” plus “Funeral for a Friend/Love Lies Bleeding” and “Harmony”.

The move to the château from Jamaica provided John and his band with a great deal of creative inspiration, and an abundance of quality material was produced, leading to the decision to release the work as a double album (LP).

In 2003, the album was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. The album was ranked number 91 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time, and number 59 in Channel 4’s 2009 list of 100 Greatest Albums.

[Lyrics]
Hello, baby hello
Haven’t seen your face for a while
Have you quit doing time for me
Or are you still the same spoiled child

Hello, I said hello
Is this the only place you thought to go
Am I the only man you ever had
Or am I just the last surviving friend that you know

Harmony and me
We’re pretty good company
Looking for an island
In our boat upon the sea
Harmony, gee I really love you
And I want to love you forever
And dream of the never, never, never leaving harmony

Hello, baby hello
Open up your heart and let your feelings flow
You’re not unlucky knowing me
Keeping the speed real slow
In any case I set my own pace
By stealing the show, say hello, hello

Back In Time – Graham Parker (1988)

Back In Time – Graham Parker (1988) FLAC Audio 1080p Video

“Back In Time” was released in the spring of 1988 on Graham Parker’s ninth album (by my count?), The Mona Lisa’s Sister. It’s impossible for me to characterize any Graham Parker song or album as “favorite” because he remains the most insanely consistent songwriter/performer of the last four decades. I probably mention this every single time I work a video to one of his songs, but I’ve listened to him since the late seventies and purchased every album he’s ever released and it just strikes me that he has pulled this off. One of my top 10 artists of all time….this is just another great Graham Parker song.

The Mona Lisa’s Sister was Parker’s first album for RCA following an acrimonious split with Atlantic and the first he produced himself (with Brinsley Schwarz). The “stripped-down” sound of the album garnered critical acclaim and presaged a back-to-basics trend in rock music in the 1990s. It was re-released by Buddah Records in 1999 with a bonus track, “Ordinary Girl”, the B-side to “Get Started. Start a Fire”. The album debuted at #77 (US) May 28, 1988. This was its highest chart position.

In 1989, it was ranked #97 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 100 best albums of the 1980s.

[Lyrics]
You stop in the old cafe where you used to play pinball
And look for the air-raid shelter but it’s gone and the cafe seems so
Small and all the gardens that had trees and stolen apples
Now have small businesses flourishing in cinder blocks
Then they will call your name and hand you a gold watch
Then they will call your name but it doesn’t sound like much
And you’ll never discover why it’s like an old lover
You can’t touch anymore It doesn’t mean much anymore
When you go back in time
Back in time

You head down to the local try to find a focal point
A scratch in the wallpaper but it’s all been wallpapered over
Down at the newsagents it’s all pornography
And you try to get high again but it’s like time-lapse photography
Then they will call your name and hand you a medal
Or something more practical like a whistling kettle
And it’ll test your metal Just try to keep grinning
Knowing that this feeling is indulgence worse than sinning
Trying to go back in time
Yeah

Photographs with a glossy finish letters lovers never finished
And there in a dusty drawer a necktie you once wore
And a girl you tried to court made you feel about two feet short
Where is she now today? What would she have to say?
Then they will call your name and hand you a pension
A bottle of pills that guarantee life extension
And give you a mention in the local boy makes good section
But all the old news is like print stains across your mind
When you try to go back in time

Yes all this old news is just print stains across your mind
When you try to go back in time
Back in time
Back, back in time

Thumb1

It’s too late, you dabblers, it’s all too late

 

Beryl – Mark Knopfler (2015) 192kHz/24bit HD FLAC Audio 4K Video

“Beryl” was released in March 2015 on Mark Knopfler’s eight solo album, Tracker. I really wish Mark would release another album with Dire Straits (give us some rock, Mark!), but even if he never does, he is an amazing songwriter and guitarist and I’m happy to support his continued solo work which never fails to satisfy. Lots of solo stuff that I’d love to video….so doing a couple of my favorites from his last album. Hope you enjoy and thank for watching!

Dame Beryl Margaret Bainbridge DBE (21 November 1932 – 2 July 2010) was an English writer from Liverpool. She was primarily known for her works of psychological fiction, often macabre tales set among the English working class. Bainbridge won the Whitbread Awards prize for best novel in 1977 and 1996; she was nominated five times for the Booker Prize. She was described in 2007 as “a national treasure”. In 2008, The Times named Bainbridge on their list of “The 50 greatest British writers since 1945”.

From Wiki:
According to the review aggregator website Metacritic, Tracker received generally favorable reviews, achieving a critical score of 70 based on 15 critic reviews. In his review for AllMusic, Stephen Thomas Erlewine gave the album three and a half out of five stars, noting that the album is “scaled smaller” than his previous double-album effort Privateering, “easing its way into being instead of announcing itself with a thunder”.Knopfler isn’t pining for the past but he is looking back, sometimes wistfully, sometimes with a resigned smile, and he appropriately draws upon sounds that he’s long loved.

In his review for American Songwriter, Hal Horowitz gave the album four out of five stars, observing:

Touches of Celtic, jazz, country and folk, but seldom rock, inform these lovely tunes that take their time as if on a leisurely stroll … He’s in no hurry telling these colorful stories that unspool slowly and deliberately. Like much of Van Morrison’s best work, the relaxed pace provides the consistent thread that makes this a cohesive album instead of a batch of songs. The softly dignified pace, immaculately constructed lyrics and especially the immediately identifiable slithering guitar lines” all work to create “timeless songs that feel organic, measured and are clearly heartfelt as Knopfler crafts music that will sound as magnificent in 50 years as it does today.”

Ken Capobianco, in his review for the Boston Globe, gave the album a positive review, writing, “Mark Knopfler continues his late-career resurgence with this skillfully crafted eighth solo effort, revealing a portrait gallery of quotidian and accomplished lives marked by yearning and reflection.” Capobianco praised Knopfler’s overall effort “delivering finely wrought, elegantly arranged songs of subtle depth and rich musicality”. In his review for Rolling Stone, Will Hermes gave the album three and a half out of five stars, calling it “modest” and “multifaceted”. Hermes noted, “Knopfler’s quicksilver guitar is understated, and he delivers stories of stoic ache like an old watchmaker on a pub stool—quietly riveting.”

In his review for The Telegraph, Neil McCormick gave the album three out of five stars, acknowledging the work’s “understated refinement”, but noting it “lacks the epic scope of Dire Straits”. According to McCormick, there is a predictability to the album that undermines its effectiveness, noting, “Fans will find much to enjoy here, but it might be time for Knopfler to push himself out of his comfort zone.” Ally Carnwath, in her review for The Guardian, also gave the album three out of five stars, observing a “predictable whiff of whiskey and rolling tobacco” about the effort. While Carnwarth notes Knopfler’s inconsistency as a storyteller, she believes his music “remains a reliable source of warm bluesy guitarwork”. In his review for Popmatters, John Garrett gave the album six out of ten stars, concluding, “It’s hard to nail down a specific identity for Tracker. The quality of each song is consistently good, but the album doesn’t feel very cohesive when you step back to consider the whole package.”

[Lyrics]
Beryl was on another level
When she got a Booker medal
She was dead in her grave
After all she gave
After all she gave
Beryl, every time they’d overlook her
When they gave her a Booker
She was dead in her grave
After all she gave
After all she gave
It’s all too late now
It’s all too late now
It’s too late, you dabblers, it’s all too late
It’s too late, you dabblers, it’s all too late
Beryl, the tobacco overtook her
When they gave her a Booker
She was dead in her grave
After all she gave
After all she gave
It’s all too late now
It’s all too late now
It’s too late, you dabblers, it’s all too late
It’s too late, you dabblers, it’s all too late
Beryl was on another level
When she got a Booker medal
She was dead in her grave
After all she gave
After all she gave
After all she gave
After all she gave

 

 

I’m all right Jack keep your hands off of my stack

Money – Pink Floyd (1973) HD FLAC 96kHz/24-bit 4k Video

“Money” was released on Pink Floyd’s 8th studio album, The Dark Side of the Moon in the winter of 1973. It was written by Roger Waters, and was the first track on side two of the LP.

I had several special projects contending for my 500th! 🙂 video…either epic or unusual things I thought I might be motivated to finish. But I couldn’t get any right so I stepped back into one I’d begun for “Money” a few years back. All I had started then was the night drive in Vegas with the falling coins and gold (and the dollar fall) over the cover art, (and the bit near the end that looks total different style!) and which were pretty cheesy, but I kept them anyway….no doubt they’ll be among those choices I most regret after I upload the video! 😉 Hope you find it interesting visually…and for sure you’ll enjoy the audio which was sourced from the Immersion Blu-ray…it’s 96kHz/24 (and I just touched the equalizer).

Released as a single, “Money” became the band’s first hit in the United States, reaching number 10 in Cash Box magazine and number 13 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The song was composed in 7/4, as stated by Gilmour in an interview with Guitar World magazine in 1993 and it changes to 4/4 time for an extended guitar solo. The first of three choruses which comprise the solo was recorded using real-time double tracking. Gilmour played the chorus nearly identically in two passes recorded to two different tracks of a multi-track tape machine. The second chorus is a single guitar. The doubled effect for the third chorus was created using automatic (or “artificial”) double-tracking (ADT). To produce the distinctive piercing high notes that distinguish the final chorus of his solo, Gilmour played a customized Lewis guitar with twenty-four frets, allowing a full four-octave range.

The lyrics are briefly referenced in the film Pink Floyd – The Wall, when the protagonist, Pink, is caught writing poems in class by his teacher. The teacher snatches the poem book from him and reads it in a very sarcastic, demeaning manner, practically encouraging Pink’s classmates to laugh. The poem is a verse of lyrics to “Money”.

“Money interested me enormously,” Waters remarked on the twentieth anniversary of Dark Side. “I remember thinking, ‘Well, this is it and I have to decide whether I’m really a socialist or not.’ I’m still keen on a general welfare society, but I became a capitalist. You have to accept it. I remember coveting a Bentley like crazy. The only way to get something like that was through rock or the football pools. I very much wanted all that material stuff.”

One of the most distinctive elements of “Money” is the rhythmic sequence of sound effects that begins the track and is heard throughout the first several bars. This was created by splicing together recordings Waters had made of clinking coins, a ringing cash register, tearing paper, a clicking counting machine and other items to construct a seven-beat effects loop.

The Dark Side of the Moon was an immediate success, topping the Billboard Top LPs & Tapes chart for one week. It subsequently remained in the charts for 741 weeks from 1973 to 1988, longer than any other album in history. With an estimated 50 million copies sold, it is Pink Floyd’s most commercially successful album and one of the best-selling albums worldwide. It has twice been remastered and re-released, and has been covered in its entirety by several other acts. It spawned two singles, “Money” and “Time”. In addition to its commercial success, The Dark Side of the Moon is one of Pink Floyd’s most popular albums among fans and critics, and is frequently ranked as one of the greatest rock albums of all time.

[Lyrics]

[Coin Intro]

[Verse 1: David Gilmour]
Money, get away
Get a good job with more pay and you’re okay
Money, it’s a gas
Grab that cash with both hands and make a stash
New car, caviar, four-star daydream
Think I’ll buy me a football team

[Verse 2: David Gilmour]
Money, get back
I’m all right Jack keep your hands off of my stack
Money, it’s a hit
Don’t give me that do goody good bullshit
I’m in the high-fidelity first class travelling set
And I think I need a Lear jet

[Solo]

[Verse 3: David Gilmour]
Money, it’s a crime
Share it fairly but don’t take a slice of my pie
Money, so they say
Is the root of all evil today
But if you ask for a rise
It’s no surprise that they’re giving none away
Away away away
Away away away

[Interview excerpts]
– Yeah — (chuckles) — I was in the right!
– Yes, absolutely in the right!
– I certainly was in the right!
– Yeah, I was definitely in the right
That geezer was cruising for a bruising!
– Yeah!
– Why does anyone do anything?
– I don’t know, I was really drunk at the time!
– I was just telling him it was in, he could get it in Number Two. He was asking why it wasn’t coming up on freight eleven. After, I was yelling and screaming and telling him why it wasn’t coming up on freight eleven. It came to a heavy blow, which sorted the matter out