Sometimes I feel like a……

Man In The Wilderness – Styx (1977) Audio Fidelity 24k Gold FLAC 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Man In The Wilderness” was released on Styx’s seventh studio album, The Grand Illusion, on July 7, 1977. It launched the band to stardom, spawned the hit singles “Come Sail Away” and “Fooling Yourself”, and sold over three million copies in the US (Triple Platinum). The Grand Illusion was a huge favorite back in the day, and I always favored Side Two a bit, check out my other vid from that side if you are inclined; “Castle Walls” https://youtu.be/DmmDHkaTIfw

I started both of these videos about the same time many years ago, but only finished the one. I’d been thinking about finishing this one and updating that one for quite awhile and wasn’t sure which I’d get finished first….turns out, it’s this one! 😉 😉 😉 Interested to see what I can do with an update for “Castle Walls” which was one of my very first attempts to video a song?

The video features flac audio sourced from Audio Fidelity’s
24 Karat Gold CD…definitely the best the album has sounded this side of the original vinyl.

As with much of Styx’s catalog, many of the songs have quasi-medieval/fantasy lyrics and themes. Some are allegories and commentaries on contemporary American life and the members’ experiences in an American rock band in the mid-to-late 1970s.

From Allmusic.com: Other than being their first platinum-selling album, The Grand Illusion led Styx steadfastly into the domain of AOR rock. Built on the strengths of “Come Sail Away”‘s ballad-to-rock metamorphosis, which gained them their second Top Ten hit, and on the high harmonies of newcomer Tommy Shaw throughout “Fooling Yourself,” The Grand Illusion introduced Styx to the gates of commercial stardom.

The pulverized growl of “Miss America” reveals the group’s guitar-savvy approach to six-string rock, while De Young pretentiously struts his singing prowess throughout the title track. Shaw’s induction into the band has clearly settled, and his guitar work, along with James Young’s, is full and extremely sharp where it matters most.

Even the songwriting is more effluent than Crystal Ball, which was released one year earlier, shedding their mystical song motifs for a more audience-pleasing lyric and chord counterpoise. Reaching number six on the album charts, The Grand Illusion was the first to display the gelled accomplishments of both Tommy Shaw and Dennis De Young as a tandem.

[Lyrics]
Another year has passed me by
Still I look at myself and cry
What kind of man have I become?
All of the years I’ve spent in search of myself
And I’m still in the dark
‘Cause I can’t seem to find the light alone

Sometimes I feel like a man in the wilderness
I’m a lonely soldier off to war
Sent away to die – never quite knowing why
Sometimes it makes no sense at all (makes no sense at all)

Ten thousand people look my way
But they can’t see the way that I feel
Nobody even cares to try
I spend my life and sell my soul on the road
And I’m still in the dark
‘Cause I can’t seem to find the light alone

Sometimes I feel like a man in the wilderness
I’m a lonely sailor lost at sea
Drifting with the tide
Never quite knowing why
Sometimes it makes no sense at all

(I’m alive)
Looking for love I’m a man with emotion
(And my heart’s on fire)
I’m dying of thirst in the middle of the ocean
I’m alive!

[Guitar solo]

Sometimes I feel like a man in the wilderness
I’m a lonely soldier off to war
Sent away to die – never quite knowing why
Sometimes it makes no sense

Sometimes it makes no sense
Sometimes it makes no sense at all, at all
Make no sense at all, at all, at all
Can’t find the meaning of it all
Can’t find a…

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Shinto and rock and roll at the Budokan

This Is Japan – Jack Green (1980) FLAC Audio 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“This is Japan” was released on Jack Green’s debut solo album, Humanesque, in 1980. I discovered this album when I was working at the record store. I recall we only received 3 copies of the album and no one knew who the artist was. I took a chance and opened a copy ——- (As I’ve mentioned in video descriptions before, I came across so much great music in this way….open a copy of an album and buy it if it was good or use the excuse that it was for in-store play …even if we didn’t like it and never played it…it happened! LOL!) —- and I remember liking it immediately, and the girl I worked with grabbed a second copy as we listened to it for the first time. Another employee bought the 3rd copy the next day. I played the hell out of it for weeks, and we special ordered some more, but never really met the demand that could be made by simply playing the album in the store….the manager would get so pissed off that I played things that we didn’t have in stock! This album was one of my favorites from the early eighties, and I’ve listened to it frequently for the last nearly 40 (ouch!) years!…still sounds as amazing as ever.

I took the FLAC audio from the CD release and equalized them for a bit more bass. I think the audio adjustment makes the tracks sound fuller with more bottom end, better, but they are just a hair under clipping and I need to give a more critical listening on my home system.

I started videos from this record over 6 years ago, but never worked them out, I really wanted to get some out so I decided to use my favorite cheat (the equalizer video! LOL!). This is my second video for a track from the album; see the first, “I Call, No Answer” (featuring Richie Blackmore’s guitar): https://youtu.be/CQuO7zEH01Y

[Lyrics]
Outside of the Tokyo Hilton
There’s a girl walking round a shrine
Singing prayers to the rising sun

A sign of life among the traffic
A brave reminder of the past
In the middle of the screaming sound

Sayonara to the sacred Samurai
Living past, ain’t it fast
This is Japan

Coming round in the land of the emperor
See a paper dragon flying through the morning sun
There the Buddha meets the future
Shinto and rock and roll at the Budokan

Sayonara to the sacred samurai
Living past, ain’t it fast
This is Japan

In the heart of Tokyo city
When it’s dark and things are moving
To the beat of fun and hustle
To the touch of flesh and muscle
Rice wine can make you happy
It’s the kind of thing that makes you feel
Closer to home
But the light are bright
And your head is spinning
On a cold dark Tokyo street you are alone in Japan

This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan

This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan
This is Japan

“I Call, No Answer”

I Call, No Answer – Jack Green (1980) FLAC Audio 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“I Call, No Answer” was released on Jack Green’s debut solo album, Humanesque, in 1980. I discovered this album when I was working at the record store. I recall we only received 3 copies of the album and no one knew who the artist was. I took a chance and opened a copy ——- (As I’ve mentioned in video descriptions before, I came across so much great music in this way….open a copy of an album and buy it if it was good or use the excuse that it was for in-store play …even if we didn’t like it and never played it…it happened! LOL!) —- and I remember liking it immediately, and the girl I worked with grabbed a second copy as we listened to it for the first time. Another employee bought the 3rd copy the next day. I played the hell out of it for weeks, and we special ordered some more, but never really met the demand that could be made by simply playing the album in the store….the manager would get so pissed off that I played things that we didn’t have in stock! This album was one of my favorites from the early eighties, and I’ve listened to it frequently for the last nearly 40 (ouch!) years!…still sounds as amazing as ever.

Jack Green played with T. Rex between 1973 and 1974, then with The Pretty Things between 1974 and 1976, recording Silk Torpedo and Savage Eye. After Phil May walked out on the Pretty Things he carried on with Peter Tolson, Gordon Edwards and Skip Alan in Metropolis. He also was a member of Rainbow for three weeks in late 1978.

I bought Pretty Things’ album Cross Talk the same year as this one and only learned many years later that Jack Green played in that groups two albums previous to Cross Talk (Silk Torpedo in 1974 and Savage Eye in 1975)….this is another really great band to check out!

I took the FLAC audio from the CD release and equalized them for a bit more bass. I think the audio adjustment makes the tracks sound fuller with more bottom end, better, but they are just a hair under clipping and I need to give a more critical listening on my home system.

I started videos from this record over 6 years ago, but never worked them out, I really wanted to get some out so I decided to use my favorite cheat (the equalizer video! LOL!). I’ll probably crank out more consecutive videos from this album than I typically do, so hope you enjoy Jack Green! Wanted to start with this track because Richie Blackmore (Rainbow, Deep Purple) played typically outstanding guitar on it, but every single track on the record has great, great guitar playing.

[Lyrics]
Drive all night motor fast
Pushing gears pumping gas
Burning rubber highway too

I’ve got to make it back to you

I call no answer
What’s the matter with your telephone line
I call, no answer
It’s disconnected all the time

Indian summer get to you
Just too long to do you good
Country women very pretty
I’m gonna find a little peace in the city

I call no answer
What’s the matter with your telephone line
I call, no answer
It’s disconnected all the time

So I take a little walk
Down by the tenement block
I knock and no one’s home
So I try the telephone

Keeping up, keeping time
Watch the road watch the line
Country women very pretty
I’m gonna find a little peace in the city

Hey, I call no answer
What’s the matter with your telephone line
I call, no answer
I can’t reach you any time

I call no answer
I’ve got to reach you I’ve got to reach you
I call, no answer,
It’s disconnected, disconnected, disconnected
I keep trying no answer
I cannot reach you all night long
I try now answer
Something wrong with your telephone line
alright

I call no answer
And no answer
I call no answer
I call no answer

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“I only had to dream to create the scene”

Magic Is A Child – Nektar (1977) SHM-CD FLAC Audio 4k Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Magic Is A Child” was the title track from Nektar’s seventh album, which was released in September of 1977. I bought this album when it was released though I didn’t know anything about the band…it was another of those cases where the cover art was intriguing enough that you needed to hear what was inside! 😉 Happy to say, I wasn’t disappointed and although I went on to listen to other Nektar albums released both before and after, Magic Is A Child remained my favorite by the band. Wanted to do a second video for a song from this album before moving on. Had a whole thing with ink effects started, then decided that I could just reuse the effect template I had made for Yes’ “Wonderous Stories”….of is it looks a little familiar?! 😉 Thanks for watching!

From Allmusic.com:
Magic Is a Child was released in 1977, the debut for new Nektar guitarist Dave Nelson. Carrying on, though, from where their last set left off, Nektar’s fascination with shorter, punchier songs continued unabated, even while the keyboards continued to swell and the guitars shifted ever more toward the symphonic. Nektar’s brightening vistas were new, however, and a fatal flaw as far as their fans were concerned. They didn’t want breezy pop, and breezy pop fans didn’t want Nektar, while the band’s new label, Polydor, apparently didn’t care either way. The art department did spring for the 13-year-old Brooke Shields to appear on the front cover, but that was it in terms of promotion. Thematically, too, little about Magic Is a Child recalls Nektar’s days as prog darlings. The opening “Away from Asgard” is a fine slab of Norse storytelling, tied into the vast dark forests of northern Germany (where the band was still based), while “Midnight Light” also has a romantic Germanic tinge, as it eulogizes the village of Seeheimut. “Love to Share,” in contrast, is an unabashed Beatles tribute, riddled with affectionate borrowings and an oddly effective backward drum, while “On the Run (The Trucker)” still sounds like a slice of AOR radio filler.

[Lyrics]
At the time I was a little boy
All my senses were in bloom
The forests were adventure
There dwelt the legends of my mind

I was the keeper of the golden key
I made all the rules
I only had to dream
To create the scene

Magic is a child
Imagination is alive
Magic is imagination
A child is alive

How the trees were so high
The cheese in the sky
Were part of my imagination
I was goblins and elves
With small mushroom shelves
As brothers Grimm would tell their stories

Opening my eyes in the morning I would see
Patterns in the trees making shapes that were a face to me

In those tireless times
And those carefree lines
That we draw ourselves
But they’re never kept

 

“Searching for the times that we lose in youth”

Listen – Nektar (1977) SHM-CD FLAC 4K Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Listen” was released on Nektar’s seventh album, Magic Is A Child, in September of 1977. I bought this album when it was released though I didn’t know anything about the artist…it was another of those where the cover art was intriguing enough that you needed to hear what was inside! 😉 Happy to say, I wasn’t disappointed and although I went on to listen to other Nektar albums released both before and after, Magic Is A Child remained my favorite by the band. There are some great tunes on this record, and I have long hoped to make vids for a couple. Here’s one. Hope you enjoy. Thanks for watching!

From Allmusic.com:
Magic Is a Child was released in 1977, the debut for new Nektar guitarist Dave Nelson. Carrying on, though, from where their last set left off, Nektar’s fascination with shorter, punchier songs continued unabated, even while the keyboards continued to swell and the guitars shifted ever more toward the symphonic. Nektar’s brightening vistas were new, however, and a fatal flaw as far as their fans were concerned. They didn’t want breezy pop, and breezy pop fans didn’t want Nektar, while the band’s new label, Polydor, apparently didn’t care either way. The art department did spring for the 13-year-old Brooke Shields to appear on the front cover, but that was it in terms of promotion. Thematically, too, little about Magic Is a Child recalls Nektar’s days as prog darlings. The opening “Away from Asgard” is a fine slab of Norse storytelling, tied into the vast dark forests of northern Germany (where the band was still based), while “Midnight Light” also has a romantic Germanic tinge, as it eulogizes the village of Seeheimut. “Love to Share,” in contrast, is an unabashed Beatles tribute, riddled with affectionate borrowings and an oddly effective backward drum, while “On the Run (The Trucker)” still sounds like a slice of AOR radio filler.

[Lyrics]
Listen
To these thoughts as they drift away
Worried times
Can turn around all the things we do
Blinded
By veils we hang to avoid the truth
Searching
For the times that we lose in youth

Listen, listen

There is no light within my eyes
As darkness comes with no surprise
Shifting shadows on the wall
As night begins to fall
Times so hard
Hurts me deep inside
But life keeps on moving
Though daybreak seems so far away

Listen, listen

Listen, can you hear me
Confusion takes me as I sing this song
Leaves me nothing to do but try again
Right or wrong, you’re gonna see a change in me

Listen, listen

Listen, listen