So ring out the old Ring in the new

Ding Dong, Ding Dong – George Harrison (1974) FLAC Audio 1080p Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Ding Dong, Ding Dong” was released in December 1974 on George Harrison’s fifth solo album, Dark Horse. I’ve been updating my old George videos and decided to take a break from those and work the old promo video for this song to the high resolution remaster of the track from 2014.

What is there to say about “Ding Dong, Ding Dong”? It’s just a really fun track and George seemed to be having typical George fun making the video.

This video is the promo video synced to audio track from the amazing The Apple Years compilation box set that was released in 2014 and which featured George’s first six albums remastered…they are a huge sound improvement over the earlier releases. The video is stretched to widescreen format and I did some minor adjustments to improve it a bit. Hope you enjoy….a 1, 2! πŸ˜‰

Dark Horse received some of the most negative reviews of any release by a Beatle up to that point and the worst of Harrison’s career. Released amid the furor surrounding his refusal to play “Beatle George during a tour that was a “whirlwind of pent-up Beatlemania”, in Leng’s words, it was as if Harrison had already committed “acts of heresy”. Rather than having his new work judged on its own merits, it was “open season” on Harrison, another biographer, Elliot Huntley, has written of the “tsunami of bile” unleashed on the ex-Beatle in late 1974.

Under the heading “Transcendental Mediocrity”, Jim Miller of Rolling Stone called Dark Horse a “disastrous album” to match the “disastrous tour”, and a “shoddy piece of work”. According to Miller, the musicians were “merely competent studio pros” and Harrison’s guitar playing was “rudimentary”. In contrast with the praise that the same publication had lavished on Harrison for Living in the Material World the year before, Rolling Stone’s reviewer described Dark Horse as a “chronicle of a performer out of his element, working to a deadline, enfeebling his overtaxed talents by a rush to deliver new ‘LP product'”, and stated: “In plain point of fact, George Harrison has never been a great artist … the question becomes whether he will ever again become a competent entertainer.”

There were a number of positive reviews for Dark Horse, with Billboard magazine deeming it a “Spotlight” release. The reviewer described the album as “an excellent one” and compared it favorably with Harrison’s acclaimed 1970 triple set, All Things Must Pass. Brian Harrigan of Melody Maker credited Harrison with establishing “a new category in music – Country and Eastern” and lauded his “nifty” slide-guitar playing and “tremendous” singing. Although he found some of the tracks overlong, Harrigan declared: “Yep, the Sacred Cowboy has produced a good one.” Combined with his feature on the tour in Circus Raves, in which he questioned the accuracy of the negative reports about the Harrison–Shankar concerts, Michael Gross described Dark Horse as matching All Things Must Pass in quality, and “surpassing” it at times, thanks to the new album’s “clarity of production and lovely songs”. Gross highlighted “So Sad” as a “luxurious track” and described “Ding Dong, Ding Dong”, “Dark Horse” and “Far East Man” as “all, simply, good songs”.

Having previously championed Harrison’s work since 1970, Rolling Stone would not change its unfavorable verdict on Dark Horse over the ensuing decades, and Harrison never completely forgave the magazine for the treatment he received during this period. In 2002, writing in the Rolling Stone Press book Harrison shortly after his death, Greg Kot approved of Dark Horse’s “jazzier backdrops” compared with Material World, but opined that Harrison’s voice turned much of the album into an “unintentionally comic exercise”. In the same publication, Mikal Gilmore identified Dark Horse as “one of Harrison’s most fascinating works – a record about change and loss”. Alan Clayson similarly writes of the interest factor of “a non-Beatle, as well as an ex-Beatle in uncertain transition”, and while classing the album as “an artistic faux pas”, describes “It Is ‘He’ (Jai Sri Krishna)” as “wonderful” and “startling”.

[Lyrics]
Ring out the old
Ring in the new
Ring out the old
Ring in the new

Ring out the false
Ring in the true
Ring out the old
Ring in the new

Ding-dong, ding-dong
Ding-dong, ding-dong
Ding-dong, ding-dong
Ding-dong, ding-dong

Yesterday, today was tomorrow
And tomorrow, today will be yesterday
So ring out the old
Ring in the new
Ring out the old
Ring in the new

Ring out the false
Ring in the true
Ring out the old
Ring in the new

Ding-dong, ding-dong
Ding-dong, ding-dong
Ding-dong, ding-dong
Ding-dong, ding-dong

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Somehow I feel inside You never ever left my side….Blamin’ it all on the nights on Broadway

Nights On Broadway – Bee Gees (1975) 2013 Japan Remaster FLAC 1080p Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Nights On Broadway” was released in the summer of 1975 on the Bee Gees’ 13th studio album, Main Course. One of my all-time Top 10 Bee Gees songs!

Watch this video in 1080p with headphones and hear how much more there is to the song if you’ve ever only heard it on the radio! Wow….fat fat sounds and vocal gymnastics, a brilliant production!

This is a very special song for me. It was one of those songs that seemed to usher me from middle school into high school and all drama life would have throw at us all after we left that cocoon of childhood happiness where days were endless and nights carefree and filled with friends and fun. “Nights On Broadway” always sounded like more a sad song that what the title and lyrics suggest, after all these years it’s become somehow even sadder for me to listen to, I guess because it’s such a powerful time machine to a period in my life when I was younger…..crazy how music can transport?!

The video is simple and effective, I believe. The Bee Gees are a band that I’ve always loved (even when they were testing me at the height of the disco era), and I can’t believe this is only my second video (I’ve finished!) for one of their songs? They were brilliant songwriters and amazing performers.

This was the last album to be released by Atlantic Records in the US under its distribution deal with Robert Stigwood. This album marked a change for the Bee Gees as it was their first album to include disco influenced songs, and it created the model for their output through the rest of the 1970s. Main Course was the first album to feature keyboardist Blue Weaver. The album cover with the band’s new logo designed by US artist Drew Struzan made its first appearance here.

According to producer Arif Mardin, when the Bee Gees arrived in Florida, they started to record new materials and some of the numbers were still in their old ballad style, and the Bee Gees at that time listening a lot of American R&B groups’ songs as Mardin is a R&B producer. Mardin also suggested they listen to current R&B artists including Stevie Wonder.

The sound became more technological with the use of synthesizers and dual bass lines (synthesizer bass by Blue Weaver and bass guitar by Maurice Gibb) on many of the songs, which came about after Weaver overdubbed a synthesizer bass line on the original demo of “Jive Talkin’.” Weaver later commented that “nothing new has been invented to make such a tremendous difference to the sound as the synthesizer did, compared to an orchestra.”

[Lyrics]
Here we are in the room full of strangers,
Standing in the dark where your eyes couldn’t see me

Well, I have to follow you
Though you didn’t want me to.
But that won’t stop my lovin’ you
I can’t stay away

Blaming it all on the nights on Broadway
Singin’ them love songs,
Singin’ them straight to the heart songs.
Blamin’ it all on the nights on Broadway
Singin’ them sweet sounds
To that crazy, crazy town.

Now in my place
There are so many others
Standin’ in the line;
How long will they stand between us?

Well, I have to follow you
Though you didn’t want me to.
But that won’t stop my lovin’ you
I can’t stay away

Blaming it all on the nights on Broadway
Singin’ them love songs,
Singin’ them straight to the heart songs.
Blamin’ it all on the nights on Broadway
Singin’ them sweet sounds
To that crazy, crazy town.

I will wait,
even if it takes forever;
I will wait,
even if it takes a life time.
Somehow I feel inside
You never ever left my side.
Make it like it was before
Even if it takes a life time, takes a life time.

Blaming it all on the nights on Broadway
Singin’ them love songs,
Singin’ them straight to the heart songs.
Blamin’ it all on the nights on Broadway
Singin’ them sweet sounds
To that crazy, crazy town.

Iiiiii oooooo nnnnnaaaaaa…Peace of Iona

Peace Of Iona – The Waterboys (2003) FLAC Audio 1080p Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Peace Of Iona” was released in the spring of 2003 on The Waterboys’ eighth studio album, Universal Hall. This is another one of my very favorite tracks by The Waterboys.

I’d always planned to do a video for this track one day, but hadn’t started anything for it yet and it’s here now really because “Church Not Made With Hands” is one of many of my old videos that I’m working on updates for, and while I was chipping away at it, I started to find things that seemed perfect for “Peace of Iona”….jumped into it and found it was a quick work, mainly because the hypnotic/repetitive nature of the song let me do what I have a tendency (and love!) to do anyway….repetitive and subtle variations on an effect! I really love how this one turned out….mainly due to the fact that this song it a stunner, hypnotic, gorgeously produced and performed, and one of the best examples of the dynamic structure of the song that The Waterboys (and Mike Scott in particular) are such masters at creating.

As always HUGE THANKS to everyone who’s art made this new art possible…THANK YOU!!!!

Universal Hall is a 2003 album released by The Waterboys. It is named after the theatre and performance hall at the Findhorn Foundation, which is pictured on the album cover. The album shows much more influence from folk music than its predecessor, A Rock in the Weary Land. It is the first Waterboys album to feature Steve Wickham since Room to Roam, and therefore the first Waterboys album with all three core members of the post-reunion band.

Mike Scott describes the album as a “record containing one Irish reel and eleven spiritual songs that articulate – to the best of my ability – the vision that drives, challenges, sustains and transforms me”.

[Lyrics]
Peace of the glancing dancing waves
Peace of the white sands
Peace of Iona

Peace of the singing winds
Peace of the stones
Peace of Iona

Iiiiii oooooo nnnnnaaaaaa

Peace of the crying gulls
Peace of the humming bees
Peace of the noon-time stillness

Peace of the dreaming hills
Peace of the breath of angels
Peace of Iona

Iiiiii oooooo nnnnnaaaaaa
Iiiiii oooooo nnnnnaaaaaa

Peace of the saints and seekers
Peace of the monks and Druids
Peace of the resting place of kings

Peace of the ruins
Peace of the doves in the bell tower
Peace of Iona

Iiiiii oooooo nnnnnaaaaaa
Iiiiii oooooo nnnnnaaaaaa

Peace of the rested mind
Peace of the glad heart
Peace of my lover’s pots and potions

Peace of her healing hands
Peace of her lazy laughter
Peace of Iona

(4x)
Peace of the unseen
Peace of the spirit
Peace of Iona

Iiiiii oooooo nnnnnaaaaaa
Iiiiii oooooo nnnnnaaaaaa
Iiiiii oooooo nnnnnaaaaaa
Iiiiii oooooo nnnnnaaaaaa

“Never seen such a beautiful girl…… Had me quickly untied”

Beautiful Girl – George Harrison (1976) FLAC Audio 1080p Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Beautiful Girl” was released in November 1976 on George Harrison’s seventh studio album, Thirty Three & 1/3.

After the disappointments of Dark Horse and Extra Texture over 1974–75, Thirty Three & 1/3 was widely viewed as a return to form for Harrison. The new album earned the artist his strongest reviews since All Things Must Pass (1970).

Billboard magazine described the release as “a sunny, upbeat album of love songs and cheerful jokes that is his happiest and most commercial package, with least high-flown postures, for perhaps his entire solo career”. The reviewer rated the production “top-notch” before concluding: “And Harrison’s often-spectacular melody writing gift gets brilliant display here.” In Melody Maker, Ray Coleman remarked on Warner Bros.’ need to re-establish Harrison, adding: “The question is merely whether the music [on Thirty Three & 1/3] merits it. Unequivocally, the answer is yes.” Coleman praised Harrison’s vocals on this “fine album” and likened the quality of his melodies to that on the Beatles’ 1965 album Rubber Soul.

In a review that author Michael Frontani terms “particularly laudatory”, Richard Meltzer of The Village Voice described Harrison’s new work as “his best LP since All Things Must Pass and on par with, say, [Bob Dylan’s] Blood on the Tracks”. Michael Gross wrote in Swank magazine that Harrison “seems with 33 1/3 to have come unstuck”, adding: “If the new record company, new girlfriend … Olivia Arias, and new disc have put him in a more secure place in the material world, he could well recapture his spot as the Beatle to watch.”

Less impressed, Rolling Stone continued to regard Harrison in an unfavourable light after what Elliot Huntley terms its “volte-face” in 1974. The magazine’s reviewer, Ken Tucker, noted the accessibility of “fast, cheerful numbers” such as “Woman Don’t You Cry for Me” and “This Song” but lamented both “George’s persistent preaching” elsewhere and that Scott’s presence rendered the album as “music with the feeling and sincerity of cellophane”. NME critic Bob Woffinden admired Harrison’s guitar playing but dismissed him as a lyric writer, before concluding: “Harrison’s general demeanour is more encouraging … While it is an album of no particular merit in itself, it is one which leads me to believe that his best work may not necessarily be behind him.” Four years later, however, Woffinden offered a more positive assessment, writing that “His spiritual convictions no longer seemed to be cramping his style, but affording him a generous and open heart. An excellent production and frequently inspired guitar work were amongst the other positive qualities which the album could boast.”

In the 1978 edition of a book that traditionally promoted an unfavorable view on Harrison’s work, The Beatles: An Illustrated Record, authors Roy Carr and Tony Tyler described Thirty Three & 1/3 as Harrison’s “best effort – by far” since All Things Must Pass. Carr and Tyler concluded: “It must be the production. For no individual track really presents itself as typifying a New Harrison Approach – and yet the impression left by the album as a whole is definitely of a more balanced, poised and devil-may-care Hari …” Robert Christgau, another critic with a low regard for Harrison’s music,] gave Thirty Three & 1/3 the highest rating of all the ex-Beatle’s solo albums thus far, with a “B–”. Christgau wrote, “This isn’t as worldly as George wants you to think – or as he thinks himself, for all I know – but it ain’t fulla shit either”, and he highlighted “Crackerbox Palace” as Harrison’s best song since “Here Comes the Sun”.

[Lyrics]
Never seen such a beautiful girl
Got me shaking inside
Calling on me from deep within her eyes
Not the kind you go handing around
Want to keep her right there
But this love it don’t come as no surprise

And when I saw the way that she smiled at me
I knew it there and then that she was A 1
And then I felt the way she was touching me
Was something I had known I was waiting upon

Never seen such a beautiful girl
Had me quickly untied
Calling to me she made me realize
Not the kind that is lost or is found
She has always been there
A lover needed for this soul to survive

And when I saw the way that she smiled at me
I knew it there and then that she was A1
And when I felt the way she got through to me
Was something I had know I was waiting upon

Never seen such a beautiful girl
Got me shaking inside
Calling on me from deep within her eyes
Not the kind you go handing around
Want to keep her right there
But this love it don’t come as no surprise

I Can See Elvis – The Waterboys (2015)

I Can See Elvis – The Waterboys (2015) FLAC Audio HD Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“I Can See Elvis” was released on The Waterboys’ eleventh studio album, Modern Blues, at the beginning of 2015. This record was produced by Mike Scott and mixed by the great Bob Clearmountain in Nashville.

This video is the first in hopefully a chunk of new uploads of things that have been sitting around way too long unfinished. This one has basically been finished for many months (only really new stuff is the the little Bowie, Prince, Kantner stuff I couldn’t resist)…but I didn’t upload it because I didn’t really like that it moved a bit slow for the track. Thought I’d go back in speed it up, but it seems like more effort that necessary….especially for a track (as much as I love it) that won’t see just a whole lot of love…..The Waterboys fans rock on with me! πŸ˜‰

HUGE THANKS to everyone who’s art made this new art possible….THANK YOU! And thank YOU for watching….I hope you enjoy!

[Lyrics]
I can see Elvis
Skinny like he was back in ’57
Razor quiffed and leather squeezed
Sideburns flickering in the breeze
That blows across the veils of heaven

I can see Elvis
Throned like a king astride a golden Harley
Smoking a reefer he just rolled
Full of Acapulco Gold
With Hendrix, Dean and Marley.

I can see Elvis
Prowling like a cat across a funky bandstand
Keith Moon behind him banging drums
Charlie Parker all thumbs
John Lennon doing handstands

I can see Elvis
Talking philosophy and law with Joan of Arc and Plato
Quizzing Shakespeare on his plays
Showing Crazy Horse and Marvin Gaye
How to dance the mashed potato

I can see Elvis
High and low and high and low and high he’shunting
Looking for a special prey who only just arrived up here today
Break out the bunting

I can see Elvis
He’s writing songs for Donald
In a little leather journal
And he revolved the words he wrote

“I’m gonna slit the throat of that skinflint the Colonel!”
I can see Elvis
I can see Elvis
I can see Elvis
I can see Elvis
I can see Elvis
I can see Elvis
Elvis!
Elvis!
(Doo- wop doo-wop doo- wop doo-wop

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Angela, can you hear the earth is turning?

Angela – John Lennon & Yoko Ono Plastic Ono Band (1972) 24/96 FLAC HD Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“Angela” was released in the summer of 1972 on John Lennon’s third (or sixth depending on how you wanna count?! πŸ˜‰ solo album, Some Time In New York City. I used to drive some of my friends (Beatle one’s even! LOL!) crazy back in the day by playing this album way too much and too loud, but I loved the way it sounded and how it rocked and then floated. Elephant’s Memory, in particular the saxophone player (Stan Bronstein) come on like an old steam engine chugging down the tracks!

That so many people disliked this record always dismayed me. It seemed some were unhappy that it wasn’t Imagine II? Actually I always felt that the biggest reason it wasn’t liked was because for too many people it had too much Yoko. Her contributions are part of what make this record special to me at least. I really love the lyrics on much of this album….listen to the beauty in the words in this song.

I was too young to remember the whole Angela Davis thing. She was beautiful, intelligent, passionate and brave…and very controversial. I watched some video of her and liked her even more.

The video is one of my fallback styles for when I’m in a holding pattern for other videos…in this case DANCING GIRLS! Debated using them here, but in the end I just liked how some of the moves went with the song’s guitar work….hope you can dig it? πŸ˜‰

On release, Some Time in New York City provided a startling contrast for listeners expecting a repeat of the well-received Imagine in 1971. According to author Robert Rodriguez, the new album received “abysmal reviews”. In a scathing critique published in Rolling Stone, Stephen Holden wrote that “the Lennon’s should be commended for their daring”, but not before calling the album “incipient artistic suicide”. Holden added: “except for ‘John Sinclair’ the songs are awful. The tunes are shallow and derivative and the words little more than sloppy nursery-rhymes that patronize the issues and individuals they seek to exalt. Only a monomaniacal smugness could allow the Lennon’s to think that this witless doggerel wouldn’t insult the intelligence and feelings of any audience.”

Dave Marsh wrote a mixed review for Creem, stating that “it’s not half bad. It may be 49.9% bad, but not half.” The Milwaukee Sentinel declared that John and Yoko had produced “another crude, superficial look at trendy leftist politics and have plunged even further into their endless echo chamber”. In the NME, Tony Tyler presented his album review in the form of an open letter, titled “Lennon, you’re a pathetic, ageing revolutionary”. After criticizing Lennon for “the general tastelessness of the presentation”, particularly the album’s lyrics and cover art, Tyler concluded: “Don’t rely on cant and rigidity. Don’t alienate. Stimulate. You know, like you used to.”

More recently, Garry Mulholland of Uncut magazine has described Some Time in New York City as “a contender for the worst LP by a major musical figure, its list of ’70s left-wing clichΓ©s hamstrung by the utter absence of conviction within the melodies and lyrics”. Writing in the Boston Phoenix in 2005, Eliot Wilder said that listening to the album was “a painful experience”. Although he conceded that Lennon “had his heart in the right place”, Wilder opined: “these tracks – pedantic, topical, elitist – show that a latter-day Dylan he was not … Refer to the Beatles’ ‘Revolution’ or his own ‘Give Peace a Chance’ if you need a dose of John the Protest Singer.” More impressed, Mark Kemp of Paste considers that “the album has been unfairly chastised”, and he identifies “Woman Is the Nigger of the World” as “one of Lennon’s finest songs” and Ono’s “Born in a Prison” as another highlight.

Special thanks to:
CODEBLACK OnDemand
Free Angela and All Political Prisoners Official Movie Trailer
https://www.youtube.com/user/codeblacktv

ichimarusan378’s channel
https://www.youtube.com/user/ichimarusan378

[Lyrics]
Angela, they put you in prison
Angela, they shot down your man
Angela, you’re one of the millions
Of political prisoners in the world

Sister, there’s a wind that never dies
Sister, we’re breathing together
Sister, our love and hopes forever
Keep on moving, oh, so slowly in the world

They gave you sunshine
They gave you sea
They gave you everything
But the jail house key

They gave you coffee
They gave you tea
They gave you everything
But equality

Angela, can you hear the earth is turning?
Angela, the world watches you
Angela, you soon will be returning
To your sisters and brothers in the world

Sister, you’re still a people teacher
Sister, your word reaches far
Sister, there’s a million different races
But we all share the same future in the world

They gave you sunshine
They gave you sea
They gave you everything
But the jail house key

They gave you coffee
They gave you tea
They gave you everything
But equality

Angela, they put you in prison
Angela, they shot down your man
Angela, you’re one of the millions
Of political prisoners in the world

“They live all their lives, without looking to see…The light that has lighted the world”

The Light That Has Lighted The World – George Harrison (1973) 24/96 FLAC HD Video ~MetalGuruMessiah~

“The Light That Has Lighted The World” was released on George Harrison’s fourth studio album, Living In The Material World, in the spring of 1973. I love every song on Living In The Material World, but “The Light That Has Lighted The World” may be my very favorite.

*Including the section of Wiki information that details how highly acclaimed this track is with many critics….just in case it’s greatness doesn’t hit you like a ton of bricks….read about it!

The song is viewed as a statement on Harrison’s discomfort with the attention afforded him as an ex-Beatle and features a prominent contribution from English session pianist Nicky Hopkins, along with a highly regarded slide guitar solo from Harrison.

“The Light That Has Lighted the World” is underpinned by Gary Wright’s stately harmonium and Harrison’s acoustic rhythm guitars, and is dominated by Hopkins’ piano. The instrumental section, in between the two verses, featuring first Hopkins and then Harrison, has received much positive comment.

Beatles biographer Alan Clayson also compliments Harrison’s slide-guitar work, writing of his “controlled grace” while “shining up the octaves” during the solo. Another biographer, Elliot Huntley, approves of the “grandiloquent ballad tone” of this and other songs on the album, and admires the “tasteful” rhythm section on “The Light That Has Lighted the World” and Harrison’s “jangling” acoustic guitars. Having interviewed Harrison for Guitar World magazine in 1987, Rip Rense has likened the guitar solo to that on the Beatles’ “Fixing a Hole”, as examples of how Harrison’s solos display “structure, syntax, and development” over “pyrotechnic flourishes”. Rense adds: “These are thoughtful and original, deceptively simple sounding, invested with feeling.” Writing for Goldmine in January 2002, Dave Thompson rated “The Light That Has Lighted the World” an “unquestioned highlight” and “a song hallmarked by distinct echoes of Lennon’s Imagine”.

In his review of the 2006 reissue of Living in the Material World, for Q magazine, Tom Doyle included the song among the album’s best three tracks and wrote: “the introspective moods of The Light That Has Lighted The World and Who Can See It, with their ornate instrumentation and weepy vocals, are lovely things.” Reviewing the 2014 Apple Years Harrison reissues, in Mojo, Doyle writes of Material World having “spotlit the spirituality and the dreaminess”, through “the gentle, non-preachy The Light That Has Lighted The World and Be Here Now, both great works of look-around-you wonder”.

Simon Leng views the mid-song soloing as a highlight: “a rolling, lilting passage from Nicky Hopkins, topped by one of Harrison’s finest performances,” he writes. “In the closing bars of the statement, repeated as the song’s coda, the guitar vocalizes a series of six-string sobs. George finally made his guitar gently weep.” While echoing Leng’s sentiments, Guitar World editor Damian Fanelli includes the slide soloing on his list of Harrison’s best post-Beatles “Guitar Moments”.

Unlike Leng, Ian Inglis views the lyrics as Harrison “[resisting] the temptation to criticize”, since instead the unenlightened “have his sympathy”. To Inglis, the song’s weakness is that the “light” Harrison is striving to see is never made clear; whether it’s love, spiritual enlightenment, or even the Beatles, “who, after all, have illuminated the world for many millions of people”. The meaning is clear to theologian Dale Allison, who sums it up as an “achingly beautiful” song that “expresses resentment toward those who dislike the ex-Beatle George but thanksgiving for those who reflect the light of God”.

I have many George Harrison videos started, but it’s been a conundrum as to which ones to finish first…and since I can’t decide, its been a long time since I got a new one uploaded. The thing is that so many of George’s songs share similar themes and lyrical content…they didn’t call him the “the spiritual one” for nothing (oh yeah, many fans called him “the quiet one” bs….he should be known as “the spiritual one”! ;-)….so anyway, I have lots of videos started and I working on one I find things that I really like, but then think, “wow..this would work better for song x”…so effects get shuffled round n round and not much gets finished.

[Lyrics]
I’ve heard how some people, have said
that I’ve changed
That I’m not what I was
How it really is a shame
The thoughts in their heads,
Manifest on their brow
Like bad scars from ill feelings
they themselves arouse
So hateful of anyone that is happy
or ‘free’
They live all their lives,
without looking to see
The light that has lighted the world

It’s funny how people, just won’t
accept change
As if nature itself – they’d prefer
re-arranged
So hard to move on
When you’re down in a hole
Where there’s so little chance,
to experience soul

I’m greatful to anyone,
that is happy or ‘free’
for giving me hope
while I’m looking to see

The light that has lighted the world