Take these broken wings and learn to fly

Blackbird – The Beatles (1968) 24bit FLAC Audio Remaster 1080p Video

*Extra Blackbird Version: This version includes extra blackbird chirping throughout the track….although it is a well recognized crime against mankind to alter ONE NOTE of what The Beatles recorded, and I know I’ll feel the wrath (and I’ll have to atone at some point!)….I couldn’t resist experimenting with the allowing the actual blackbird to chirp….I kind of like the effect myself, but I’ll probably upload a version in its unaltered glory for the purists. Maybe edit the video a bit while I’m at it for some variety?

Although I frequently do vids for solo-Beatles tracks and The Beatles will always be my favorite group, I just don’t do many Beatles videos (think this is only the 4th!) since they have all mostly been done so much, but I’ve been thinking about a few I’d like to try something with and “Blackbird” was an fun one to do. Thanks for watching!

“Blackbird” was released in November of 1968 on The Beatles’ ninth studio album, eponymous titled The Beatles. The album is widely known and referred to as “The White Album”, a double album, its plain white sleeve has no graphics or text other than the band’s name embossed (and, on the early LP and CD releases, a serial number).

Most of the songs on the album were written during March and April 1968 at a Transcendental Meditation course in Rishikesh, India. Although the group’s experience of the course was mixed, the lack of external influences or drugs sparked the band’s creativity and they returned to England with around 40 new songs. They regrouped at George Harrison’s house, Kinfauns, in May and recorded demos of 26 songs, enough for a double album. The group returned to EMI Studios to record the new material, with sessions lasting through to mid October, but their experiences in Rishikesh did not help motivate them in the studio. Because the Beatles had unlimited recording time, there was little attempt to rehearse anything as a group, so everything was captured on tape, after which they would overdub voices and additional instruments. Arguments broke out between the Beatles, and witnesses in the studio saw John Lennon and Paul McCartney quarrel with one another. The feuds intensified when Lennon’s new partner, Yoko Ono, started attending the sessions. In addition, McCartney was not happy about the avant-garde piece “Revolution 9”, while Lennon disliked several of McCartney’s songs. After a series of problems, including producer George Martin taking a sudden leave of absence and engineer Geoff Emerick quitting, Ringo Starr left the band briefly in August, and consequently missed the recording of two tracks. The same tensions continued throughout the following year, leading to the group’s eventual disbandment in April 1970.

On release, The Beatles received mixed reviews from music journalists. Most critics found its satirical songs unimportant and apolitical amid a turbulent political and social climate, although some praised Lennon and McCartney’s songwriting on the album. The band and Martin have since debated whether the group should have released a single album instead. Nonetheless, The Beatles reached number one on the charts in both the United Kingdom and the United States and has since been viewed by some critics as one of the greatest albums of all time.

[Lyrics]
Blackbird singing in the dead of night
Take these broken wings and learn to fly
All your life
You were only waiting for this moment to arise.

Blackbird singing in the dead of night
Take these sunken eyes and learn to see
All your life
You were only waiting for this moment to be free.

Blackbird fly Blackbird fly
Into the light of the dark black night.

Blackbird fly Blackbird fly
Into the light of the dark black night.

Blackbird singing in the dead of night
Take these broken wings and learn to fly
All your life
You were only waiting for this moment to arise
You were only waiting for this moment to arise
You were only waiting for this moment to arise.

Thumb1 Thumb2 Thumb3

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s