I don’t want to fade away… In your heart I want to stay.

Bell Bottom Blues – Derek and the Dominos (1970) HD FLAC Remaster HD Video

“Bell Bottom Blues” was the second song on the first side of Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, which was the only album released by the supergroup Derek and the Dominos, from the winter of 1970.

I had been working on a video for “Layla” and stopped along the way for “Bell Bottom Blues”! The mod dancer effects was from my “Wah-Wah” video and I’d pulled them up (recreated them to remove a couple of skipped frames that had gotten past me when I first made them ) for the “Bell Bottom Blues” video….the drummer album cover effect was in my “Layla” vid. I realized that these two effects might be used to make for a quick “Bell Bottom Blues” (my second favorite from the album)….so I planned on making a very simple video built around them. Of course then I find myself in a familiar and frustrating situation where I’m working two videos and can’t decide which effect to use where since I try to not cheat too much and like each video to look as different as possible. This was a pretty quick effort and the foundation of a much better video, but the upcoming video for “Layla” incorporate much more of the things I was finding along the way. (Not sure who that one girl is, but man she also looks great as “Layla” ;-)….what a great pic!) Hope you enjoy!

The collaboration that created Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, Derek and the Dominos, grew out of Eric Clapton’s frustration with the hype associated with the supergroups Cream and the short-lived Blind Faith. Following the latter’s dissolution, he joined Delaney & Bonnie and Friends, whom he had come to know while they were the opening act on Blind Faith’s US tour in the summer of 1969.

After that band also split up, a Friends alumnus, Bobby Whitlock, joined up with Clapton in Surrey, England. From April 1970, the two spent weeks writing a number of songs “just to have something to play”, as Whitlock put it. These songs would later make up the bulk of the material on Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs.

Having toured with Joe Cocker straight after leaving Delaney & Bonnie, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon reunited with Clapton and Whitlock in England. Clapton attempted to avoid the limelight under cover of the anonymous “Derek and the Dominos”, with whom he played a tour of small clubs in Britain during the first three weeks of August. The group’s name had reportedly resulted from a gaffe made by the announcer at their first concert, who mispronounced the band’s provisional name, “Eric & The Dynamos”. In fact, Clapton chose “Derek and the Dominos” because he did not want his name and celebrity to get in the way of maintaining a “band” image. When the tour was over, they headed for Criteria Studios in Miami to record an album.

The source of the album’s eventual centerpiece, “Layla”, was rooted in Clapton’s personal life; he had become infatuated with Pattie Boyd, the wife of his friend George Harrison. Not even heroin, which Clapton had then begun to use, could dull the pain. Dave Marsh, in The Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock and Roll, wrote that “there are few moments in the repertoire of recorded rock where a singer or writer has reached so deeply into himself that the effect of hearing them is akin to witnessing a murder, or a suicide … to me, ‘Layla’ is the greatest of them.”

As usual HUGE THANKS to everyone who’s art made this new art possible!

[Lyrics]
Bell bottom blues, you made me cry.
I don’t want to lose this feeling.
And if I could choose a place to die
It would be in your arms.

Do you want to see me crawl across the floor to you?
Do you want to hear me beg you to take me back?
I’d gladly do it because
I don’t want to fade away.
Give me one more day, please.
I don’t want to fade away.
In your heart I want to stay.

It’s all wrong, but it’s all right.
The way that you treat me baby.
Once I was strong but I lost the fight.
You won’t find a better loser.

Do you want to see me crawl across the floor to you?
Do you want to hear me beg you to take me back?
I’d gladly do it because
I don’t want to fade away.
Give me one more day, please.
I don’t want to fade away.
In your heart I want to stay.

Do you want to see me crawl across the floor to you?
Do you want to hear me beg you to take me back?
I’d gladly do it ’cause
I don’t want to fade away.
Give me one more day, please.
I don’t want to fade away.
In your heart I want to stay.

Bell bottom blues, don’t say goodbye.
I’m sure we’re gonna meet again,
And if we do, don’t you be surprised
If you find me with another lover.

Do you want to see me crawl across the floor to you?
Do you want to hear me beg you to take me back?
I’d gladly do it ’cause
I don’t want to fade away.
Give me one more day, please.
I don’t want to fade away.
In your heart I want to stay.

I don’t want to fade away.
Give me one more day please.
I don’t want to fade away.
In your heart I want to stay.

I don’t want to fade away.
Give me one more day please.
I don’t want to fade away.
In your heart I want to stay.

Tiny Dancer – Elton John (1971) HD FLAC Remaster HD Video

Tiny Dancer – Elton John (1971) HD FLAC Remaster HD Video

“Tiny Dancer” was released in the winter of 1971 on Elton John’s fourth studio album, Madman Across The Water. I’ve been playing with vids for fav tracks from Madman for years, but those two songs (“Levon” and the title track) have been very difficult to finish, so I jumped into a song I knew I could get done using some old tried and true (and maybe getting tired at this point?! LOL!) techniques. I’ll continue to pick at those other songs from Madman (“Levon” especially is so damn elusive concept-wise…..wish me luck!)….but until then hope ya enjoy “Tiny Dancer”!

FROM WIKI:
John, Johnstone, Dee Murray and Nigel Olsson, who would be the main musicians on the next album (Honky Chateau), would soon join with percussionist Ray Cooper and form the best-known line-up of his mid-1970s band. As with all John songs during this period, the lyrics were penned by his writing partner, Bernie Taupin. This was the last album to be recorded at London’s Trident Studios. They relocated to Château d’Hérouville for the next three albums. Caleb Quaye and Roger Pope wouldn’t play with John again until Rock of the Westies in 1975, following Murray and Olsson’s departure from the band.

Upon its release, Madman Across the Water was almost ignored in John’s homeland, barely reaching #41 on the UK Albums Chart and spending only two weeks there. It has been the lowest-charting album of his career to date. The album fared better in North America, peaking at #8 on the U.S. Billboard Top Pop Albums and placing at #10 on the year-end list of 1972. It received Gold by the RIAA in February 1972, achieving $1 million in sales at wholesale value just in the United States. In 1998, the album was certified Multi-Platinum, representing shipments of over 2 million units in the U.S.

The title song was set to be released on John’s previous album Tumbleweed Connection. However, it was set aside and would eventually be re-recorded and serve as the title track of this album. Previous versions of the song (from the Tumbleweed sessions with Mick Ronson on guitar) can still be found, specifically on the remastered Tumbleweed Connection CD.

When it was released in ‘The Classic Years’ collection, it was the first album not to feature any bonus tracks. One known track recorded at the time, “Rock Me when He’s Gone,” was released on Rare Masters a few years before. The song was written for and recorded by one of John’s long-time friends, Long John Baldry. This was John’s first album in which he plays his piano and no other keyboards. This was the first album in which Davey Johnstone played guitar for John, a role that would continue for decades.

HUGE THANKS to everyone who’s art made this new art possible….THANK YOU!!!! And THANK YOU!!!! for watching! 🙂

[Lyrics]
Blue jean baby, L.A. lady, seamstress for the band
Pretty eyed, pirate smile, you’ll marry a music man
Ballerina, you must have seen her dancing in the sand
And now she’s in me, always with me, tiny dancer in my hand

Jesus freaks out in the street
Handing tickets out for God
Turning back she just laughs
The boulevard is not that bad

Piano man he makes his stand
In the auditorium
Looking on she sings the songs
The words she knows, the tune she hums

But oh how it feels so real
Lying here with no one near
Only you and you can hear me
When I say softly, slowly

Hold me closer tiny dancer
Count the headlights on the highway
Lay me down in sheets of linen
You had a busy day today

Hold me closer tiny dancer
Count the headlights on the highway
Lay me down in sheets of linen
You had a busy day today

Blue jean baby, L.A. lady, seamstress for the band
Pretty eyed, pirate smile, you’ll marry a music man
Ballerina, you must have seen her dancing in the sand
And now she’s in me, always with me, tiny dancer in my hand

But oh how it feels so real
Lying here with no one near
Only you and you can hear me
When I say softly, slowly

Hold me closer tiny dancer
Count the headlights on the highway
Lay me down in sheets of linen
You had a busy day today

Hold me closer tiny dancer
Count the headlights on the highway
Lay me down in sheets of linen
You had a busy day today

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Blow Away – George Harrison (1979) HQ FLAC Remaster HD Video

Blow Away – George Harrison (1979) HQ FLAC Remaster HD Video

“Blow Away” was released in the winter of 1979 on George Harrison’s seventh solo album, George Harrison.

This is I believe the thirteenth video I’ve made for a George Harrison song (George must be the artist I’ve made the most videos for!) and the second from the 1979 album….after “Your Love Is Forever” https://youtu.be/pY9TX_Q7j-o

A new George Harrison album was always an exciting and memorable event when I was growing up and each one (as with the other Beatle solo albums) brings distinctive memories of very specific times, places, people and emotions of my youth. I had been in awe of George’s previous album, 33&1/3 and was thrilled to finally hear that he had a new album. It was my last year of high school and I took a friend along with me hauling some cattle to a ranch near Corpus Christi for my dad on a Saturday. I was more than happy to make the trip because I knew it would allow me a chance to get into a city to a record shop and pick up George’s new album. Though the trip wouldn’t normally take me thorough San Antonio, I made a detour to the route and picked up both the album, cassette, AND! a great promo poster for the LP (In those days I was very skilled at convincing record store employees to give me promo material! LOL!, of course once I started working at one the next year such material became much more available and….yes, I still have that poster!). To this day every time I listen to this album (which is often, btw) I think of the hassles of driving that cattle trailer through the city and then happily listening to this album on cassette with my friend as I winded through the Texas countryside with the blue sky, white puffy clouds and sunshine above us!

From Wiki: With Harrison’s penchant for leisure and travel following Thirty Three & 1/3’s release, he had not started recording a follow-up until mid-1978, although he had been writing songs during his hiatus. Teaming up with a co-producer for the first time in years, Harrison decided to use Russ Titelman to help realise the music for George Harrison, which was recorded at his home studio, entitled Friar Park, with string overdubs being effected at London’s AIR Studios. Special guests included Steve Winwood, Gary Wright (who co-wrote “If You Believe”) and Eric Clapton.

The album was previewed by the single “Blow Away”, which reached No. 51 in the United Kingdom and No. 16 in the United States. George Harrison received positive reviews upon its February 1979 release. It reached No. 39 in the UK and it peaked at No. 14 in the US, going gold. “Blow Away” as a single was also successful in Canada, peaking at No. 7 on the singles chart. Harrison’s increasing efforts, however, were being directed towards the film industry, having formed Handmade Films in order to help his friends in Monty Python complete Life of Brian.

Three of the songs from the eponymous album were included on Harrison’s Best of Dark Horse 1976–1989 compilation: “Blow Away,” an edited version of “Here Comes the Moon,” and the single edit version of “Love Comes to Everyone.” “Blow Away” was also included in the career-spanning compilation Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison.

In 2004, George Harrison was remastered and reissued both separately and as part of the deluxe box set The Dark Horse Years 1976-1992 on Dark Horse with new distribution by EMI, adding the bonus track demo version of “Here Comes the Moon”, recorded just after it was written in Hawaii.

Till next one…..hope you enjoy this one! Thanks for sharing your joy of music with me!

As always, HUGE THANKS to everyone who’s art made this new art possible…THANK YOU!!!

[Lyrics]
Day turned black, sky ripped apart
Rained for a year ’til it dampened my heart
Cracks and leaks
The floorboards caught rot
About to go down
I had almost forgot.

All I got to do is to love you
All I got to be is, be happy
All it’s got to take is some warmth to make it
Blow Away, Blow Away, Blow Away.

Sky cleared up, day turned to bright
Closing both eyes now the head filled with light
Hard to remember what a state I was in
Instant amnesia
Yang to the Yin.

All I got to do is to love you
All I got to be is, be happy
All it’s got to take is some warmth to make it
Blow Away, Blow Away, Blow Away.

Wind blew in, cloud was dispersed
Rainbows appearing, the pressures were burst
Breezes a-singing, now feeling good
The moment had passed
Like I knew that it should.

All I got to do is to love you
All I got to be is, be happy
All it’s got to take is some warmth to make it
Blow Away, Blow Away, Blow Away.

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