Step outside — take a look at the stars; Catch a glimpse of the way things are —

“Making Contact” was released in the fall on 1984 on Bruce Cockburn’s 14th studio album, Stealing Fire. I love this record!

After I made my last video (Van Morrison’s “Sweet Thing”), I looked at my backlog of projects to see which tracks from my other of my favorite artists (or albums) that I’d started but had fallen (almost! 😉 through the cracks….needless to say I found many things that were truly special to me sitting in various stages of completion. Again, trying to focus on my favorite artists (or albums) which I’d not finished anything for, I found a few things that I wanted to commit to and have promised myself to not let them get so far out of mind again. This song comes from an album that I have long cherished, it’s definitely ranked in my top 25 or so….it’s just a really special collection of songs that are produced about as well as anything I’ve ever heard. I found I’d already created a template for tracks from this album and had listed 4 that I would like to video. I jumped back into two of them and surprisingly enough, they were both fairly quick work, and I hope to have the other one uploaded soon as well. Till then….hope you enjoy this one.

From Wiki:
Stealing Fire is an album by Bruce Cockburn released in 1984. It featured the hit singles “If I Had a Rocket Launcher”, an angry political commentary on refugees under fire, and “Lovers in a Dangerous Time”. John Naslen received a Juno Award for “Recording Engineer of the Year” for his work on this album, and producers Goldsmith and Crawford received a nomination for “Producer of the Year”.

After a trip to Central America on behalf of the Canadian arm of the charity Oxfam, Cockburn crafted an album featuring world-music influences and lyrics concerning life in the third world. He was moved by the plight of Guatemalan refugees in southern Mexico (“On the Rio Lancantún one hundred thousand wait”), and wrote the song “If I Had a Rocket Launcher” which reached a high of #88 on the Billboard Hot 100 charts with an associated music video regularly played on MTV. Despite the apparent threat of violence in the lyrics, Cockburn would later state, “this is not a call to arms; this is a cry.”

The single “Lovers in a Dangerous Time” contains some of Cockburn’s most recognizable lyric writing form, with the picturesque line “got to kick at the darkness till it bleeds daylight”. This line would be picked up by U2’s lead singer and lyricist Bono who would use it in the U2 song “God Part II” (from their 1988 Rattle and Hum album) with his own line “I heard a singer on the radio late last night / Says he’s gonna kick the darkness till it bleeds daylight”. For this reason, Cockburn is credited in the liner notes to Rattle and Hum. U2 would also later attempt a cover of Cockburn’s hit song “If I Had a Rocket Launcher” in rehearsal, but did not formally record the results.

{Lyrics}Step outside — take a look at the stars
Catch a glimpse of the way things are —
Making contact…
Smell of sweet fresh oil on skin
When you move on me like the tide coming in —
Making contact…
So many ways to understand
One for every woman and man
Been that way since the world began
I hear the drumming of the surf and I have to dance
Stepping to the rhythm of circumstance —
Making contact…
I feel so huge — I feel so small
I feel so good I want to swallow it all–
Making contact…
Making contact
Swimming in an ocean of love
Making contact
Swimming in an ocean of love
We move together like the waves
Swimming in an ocean of love
Every night and every day
Swimming in an ocean of love
One world — one human race
Swimming in an ocean of love
One kiss from a smiling face
Swimming in an ocean of love
See that sign coming into view
Swimming in an ocean of love
Mother sea welcomes you
Swimming in an ocean of love
Making contact…

And a few screen caps for alternate thumbs:

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By MetalGuruMessiah

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